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A Vision Into the Post-Apocalyptic Future of Antimicrobial Resistance

March 19th, 2017

medications-pills-floating-in-black-space image www.newcures.info

About 4 million years ago, a cave was forming in the Delaware Basin of what is now Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico. From that time on, Lechuguilla Cave remained untouched by humans or animals until its discovery in 1986—an isolated, pristine primeval ecosystem.

When the bacteria found on the walls of Lechuguilla were analyzed, many of the microbes were determined not only to have resistance to natural antibiotics like penicillin, but also to synthetic antibiotics that did not exist on earth until the second half of the twentieth century. As infectious disease specialist Brad Spellberg put it in the New England Journal of Medicine, “These results underscore a critical reality: antibiotic resistance already exists, widely disseminated in nature, to drugs we have not yet invented.”

The origin story of antibiotics is well known, almost mythic, and antibiotics, along with the other basic public health measures, have had a dramatic impact on the quality and longevity of our modern life. When ordinary people called penicillin and sulfa drugs miraculous, they were not exaggerating. These discoveries ushered in the age of antibiotics, and medical science assumed a lifesaving capability previously unknown.

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Note that we use the word discoveries rather than inventions. Antibiotics were around many millions of years before we were. Since the beginning of time, microbes have been competing with other microbes for nutrients and a place to call home. Under this evolutionary stress, beneficial mutations occurred in the “lucky” and successful ones that resulted in the production of chemicals—antibiotics—to inhibit other species of microbes from thriving and reproducing, while not compromising their own survival. Antibiotics are, in fact, a natural resource—or perhaps more accurately, a natural phenomenon—that can be cherished or squandered like any other gift of nature, such as clean and adequate supplies of water and clean air.

Equally natural, as Lechuguilla Cave reminds us, is the phenomenon of antibiotic resistance. Microbes move in the direction of resistance in order to survive. And that movement, increasingly, threatens our survival.

With each passing year, we lose a percentage of our antibiotic firepower. In a very real sense, we confront the possibility of revisiting the Dark Age where many infections we now consider routine could cause severe illness, when pneumonia or a stomach bug could be a death sentence, when a leading cause of mortality in the United States was tuberculosis.

The Review on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) determined that, left unchecked, in the next 35 years antimicrobial resistance could kill 300,000,000 people worldwide and stunt global economic output by $100 trillion. There are no other diseases we currently know of except pandemic influenza that could make that claim. In fact, if the current trend is not altered, antimicrobial resistance could become the world’s single greatest killer, surpassing heart disease or cancer.

In some parts of the United States, about 40 percent of the strains of Streptococcus pneumonia, which the legendary nineteenth and early twentieth century physician Sir William Osler called “the captain of the men of death,” are now resistant to penicillin. And the economic incentives for pharmaceutical companies to develop new antibiotics are not much brighter than those for developing new vaccines. Like vaccines, they are used only occasionally, not every day; they have to compete with older, extremely cheap generic versions manufactured overseas; and to remain effective, their use has to be restricted rather than promoted.

As it is, according to the CDC, each year in the United States at least 2,000,000 people become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and at least 23,000 people die as a direct result of these infections. More people die each year in this country from MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, often picked up in hospitals) than from AIDS.

If we can’t—or don’t—stop the march of resistance and come out into the sunlight, what will a post-antibiotic era look like? What will it actually mean to return to the darkness of the cave?

Without effective and nontoxic antibiotics to control infection, any surgery becomes inherently dangerous, so all but the most critical, lifesaving procedures therefore would be complex risk-benefit decisions. You’d have a hard time doing open-heart surgery, organ transplants, or joint replacements, and there would be no more in vitro fertilization. Caesarian delivery would be far more risky. Cancer chemotherapy would take a giant step backwards, as would neonatal and regular intensive care. For that matter, no one would go into a hospital unless they absolutely had to because of all the germs on floors and other surfaces and floating around in the air. Rheumatic fever would have lifelong consequences. TB sanitaria could be back in business. You could just about do a post-apocalyptic sci-fi movie on the subject.

To understand why antibiotic resistance is rapidly increasing and what we need to do to avert this bleak future and reduce its impact, we have to understand the Big Picture of how it happens, where it happens, and how it’s driven by use in humans and animals.

Human Use

Think of an American couple, both of who work fulltime. One day, their 4-year-old son wakes up crying with an earache. Either mom or dad takes the child to the pediatrician, who has probably seen a raft of these earaches lately and is pretty sure it’s a viral infection. There is no effective antiviral drug available to treat the ear infection. Using an antibiotic in this situation only exposes other bacteria that the child may be carrying to the drug and increases the likelihood that an antibiotic resistant strain of bacteria will win the evolutionary lottery. But the parent knows that unless the child has been given a prescription for something, the daycare center isn’t going to take him and neither partner can take off from work. It doesn’t seem like a big deal to write an antibiotic prescription to solve this couple’s dilemma, even if the odds the antibiotic is really called for are minute.

While the majority of people understand that antibiotics are overprescribed and therefore subject to mounting resistance, they think the resistance applies to them, rather than the microbes. They believe that if they take too many antibiotics – whatever that unknown number might be—they will become resistant to the agents, so if they are promoting a risk factor, it is only for themselves rather than for the entire community.

Doctors, of course, understand the real risk. Are they culpable to the charge of over- and inappropriately prescribing antibiotics? In too many cases, the answer is Yes.

Why do doctors overprescribe? Is it about covering their backsides in this litigious society? Is it a lack of awareness of the problem? According to Brad Spellberg, “The majority of the problem really revolves around fear. It’s not any more complicated than that. It’s brain stem level, sub-telencephalonic, not-conscious-thought fear of being wrong. Because we don’t know what our patients have when they’re first in front of us. We really cannot distinguish viral from bacterial infections. We just can’t.”

Spellberg cited a case, one he heard at an infectious disease conference he attended. A 25-year-old woman came into the urgent care facility of a prominent health care network complaining of fever, sore throat, headache, runny nose and malaise. These are the symptoms of a classic viral syndrome and the facility followed exactly the proper procedure. They didn’t prescribe an antibiotic, but instead told her to go home, rest, keep herself hydrated, maybe have some chicken soup, and they would call her in three days to make sure she was all right.

She came back a week later in septic shock and died soon after.

“It turns out she had Lemierre’s disease,” says Spellberg. “It clotted her jugular vein from a bacterial infection that spread from her throat to her bloodstream. This is about a one-in-10,000 event; it’s pretty darn rare. But it’s a complication of an antecedent viral infection, and it’s a known complication. So this patient, ironically, would have benefitted from receiving inappropriate antibiotics. How many times do you think doctors need to have those things happen before they start giving antibiotics to every person who walks in the door?”

As much difficulty as we’re having controlling antibiotic resistance in the First World, for the rest, we believe the situation to be a whole lot worse.

In many of these countries, antibiotics are sold right over the counter just like aspirin and nasal spray; you don’t even need a doctor’s prescription. While we in the public health community would certainly like to see a complete cessation of antibiotic use without a prescription, how do we tell sick people in developing countries that they first have to see a doctor, when there may be no more than one or two physicians for thousands of individuals, and even if they could find one, they couldn’t afford the visit in the first place? Taking an action in a vacuum, such as banning over-the-counter sales without improving infrastructure, simply isn’t viable.

We also have to understand the inordinate burden antibiotic resistance places on the world’s poor. Current effective antibiotics now out of patent may cost only pennies a dose. When those are no longer useful, new compounds will cost many dollars a dose – far more than the poor can afford.

Many of the antibiotic compounds in the developing world are produced in loosely or unregulated manufacturing facilities, where there is no way to gauge quality control. And millions of poor people are living in tightly packed urban slums with inadequate hygiene and sanitary conditions, which generate both more disease and more opportunity for microbes to share resistance characteristics with each other.

Animal use—for food and pets

All of the world’s use of antibiotics for humans is a relatively small percentage of total use. The US, Canada and Europe use about 30 percent of our antibiotics on humans. The rest we use on animals—specifically, animals we kill for food or companion animals and pets.

We produce our food animals in very large numbers and raise them densely packed together, whether we’re talking about chicken and turkey operations, cattle and swine feedlots, or industrial fish farms. While these animals are less likely to catch infectious diseases when large production operations use high levels of biosecurity—the practice of limiting the ways that disease-causing germs can contact the animals—when these germs do get introduced their spread is rapid and extensive. So we use antibiotics to treat the resulting infections. But we also use them to prevent infections in the first place, or to control them by dosing healthy animals so they don’t catch anything from the sick ones. And then we use them to enhance growth.

For decades we have given food-production animals repeated doses of certain antibiotics to make them grow bigger and fatter, producing more meat per animal. This practice is known as growth promotion. The FDA has implemented a voluntary plan with the agriculture industry to phase out the use of certain antibiotics for growth promotion. The European Union banned this use in 1969, though they still use antibiotics for infection prophylaxis, control, and treatment. The AMR found mounting evidence that the use of antibiotics for growth promotion may only provide very modest benefits to farmers in the high-income counties, usually less than 5 percent additional growth.

How does use of this affect us? The AMR team reviewed 280 published, peer-reviewed research articles that address the use of antibiotics in food production. Of these, 72 percent found evidence of a link between antibiotic use in animals and antibiotic resistance in humans. Only 5 percent, found no link between antibiotic use in animals and human infections.

Certain enlightened nations like Sweden, Denmark, and the Netherlands have limited agricultural use and set up comprehensive surveillance systems to determine the rates of antibiotic resistance in human and animal disease-causing germs. Jaap Waganaar, Professor of Clinical Infectiology at Utrecht University, points out that while the Netherlands has traditionally had the lowest rate of antibiotic use for humans in the European Union, as a major agricultural exporter, it was the highest on the animal side. To combat this, the health ministry set prospective standards to be met year by year, mandating full and transparent reporting by the industry. Antibiotics for animal use must be prescribed by certified veterinarians. And for the most powerful antimicrobial agents, there must be confirmation that there is no reasonable alternative to their use.

Most other nations have not attempted to institute such progressive practices. As the developing world has adopted our “meat-centric” diet, they have also adopted our agribusiness formula for producing that meat, making heavy use of antibiotics for animal growth.

We see another frightening example of the mess we’re in China, with the use of colistin, an absolute last-ditch antibiotic for bacteria that react to nothing else. It was isolated in Japan in 1949 and then developed in the 1950s, but not used unless absolutely necessary because of potential kidney damage. They don’t use it for people in China, but are using it in agriculture—thousands of tons a year. Likewise, in Vietnam it is only approved for animal use, but physicians obtain it from veterinarians for their human patients.

Colistin is used for people, though, in much of the rest of the world, including India. As other antibiotics with fewer harmful side effects have become resistant, colistin is about the only agent still effective against certain bloodstream infections in newborn infants. In early 2015, as reported by Bloomberg, physicians treating two babies with life-threatening bloodstream infections at King Edward Memorial Hospital in Pune, India, found that the bacteria were resistant to colistin. One of the babies died.

“If we lose colistin, we have nothing,” stated Umesh Vaidya, head of the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. “It’s an extreme, extreme worry for us.” Some hospitals in India are already finding that 10 to 15 percent of the bacterial strains they test are colistin-resistant.

What is worse, some bacteria can share independent little hunks of DNA, called plasmids, with each other. And on one such plasmid, Chinese researchers found a gene known as mcr-1 that conferred colistin resistance. More recently, they have detected NDM-1—for New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase—an enzyme that protects bacteria against an important class of antibiotics called carbapenems, used mainly in hospitals against already multidrug-resistant bugs.

Recently, colistin-resistant E. coli, made itself know in the United States—in the urine of a 49-year-old woman in Pennsylvania. When an article documenting this unhappy development appeared shortly after in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, CDC’s Tom Frieden said, “It basically shows us that the end of the road isn’t very far away for antibiotics—that we may be in a situation where we have patients in our intensive-care units, or patients getting urinary tract infections for which we do not have antibiotics.”

Many of the largest chicken-growing concerns in India, including ones that supply meat for the nation’s McDonald’s and KFC outlets, use one of several antibiotic cocktails that combine colistin with such other vital antibiotics as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin, neomycin and doxycycline. According to an article by Ms. Pearson and Ganesh Nagarajan, “Interviews with farmers indicated that the drugs, permitted for veterinary use in India, were sometimes viewed as vitamins and feed supplements, and were used to stave off disease—a practice linked to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.”

“The combination of colistin and ciprofloxacin is just stupidity on a scale that defines all imagination,” commented Timothy Walsh, Professor of Medical Microbiology at Cardiff University in Wales.

What are the implications of all of this? The end result could very well be untreatable bacterial infections going directly into the world food supply. This would be the ultimate Frankenstein scenario.

Excerpted from Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, Copyright © 2017 by Michael T. Osterholm and Mark Olshaker. Used with permission of Little, Brown and Company, New York. All rights reserved.

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Henry Sapiecha

Just Hours after this photo was taken, she tragically died

March 19th, 2017

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed image www.newcures.info

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed

IT WAS supposed to be a fun night with her friends celebrating her 20th birthday – and when Gabrielle Marsh started to get a headache, no one suspected she would be dead hours later.

Photos of the night show the young Auckland woman raising a toast with her best friends, showing off the platter of food she’d thoughtfully planned and created for the night.

Two hours after those photos were taken Gabby, as she was known, was lying on the floor of her home in agony, her mother Kathryn at her side and an ambulance on its way.

Later that night as Gabby lay hooked up to life support machines Auckland City Hospital staff delivered the heartbreaking news to her family – she had suffered a brain haemorrhage and was unlikely to survive.

The next day a decision was made. Gabby was to be taken off life support – but not until her organs had been donated.

And on Monday March 6, on her 20th birthday, after her family had said their goodbyes, Gabby was taken to surgery.

“The woman at the hospital called me and said it was all done, and the donation was taking place as we speak,” Kathryn Marsh told the NZ Herald.

“Gabby loved doing things for other people, and that was her biggest, most amazing gift.”

Gabby’s organs saved the lives of at least six people; her kidney, pancreas, lungs, liver and heart valves were all successfully donated.

“Of course, more than anything, we would love to have her here, but that’s not to be,” said Kathryn.

“But if anything good can come out of it, if she has helped people, then that’s comforting.”

Gabby was the eldest of three children and is survived by Jacob, 18 and 16-year-old Victoria.

Her death was the second tragedy for her family, her father Shayne died just 17 months ago after a long illness.

“It’s still not really sunken in, it was so sudden,” Kathryn said.

“Shayne was sick for 14 months and we all had time to get used to the idea, but with Gabby it was the complete opposite. It’s left us all a bit shell-shocked.”

Gabby was born and raised in Auckland, attending Mount Albert Grammar School before enrolling at Auckland University.

She was about to start her third year of a double degree in commerce and law when she died.

“She was a really good sister, she was kind, generous and she was like a second mum to me,” Jacob said.

Her family described her as extremely thoughtful and loving, adventurous, caring, a “rock star academic” and a young woman motivated and driven with a lot of energy.

“She had a killer smile that came easy and often,” her aunt Michelle Cliffe said.

Kathryn said she didn’t know where to begin when asked what was special about her eldest child.

“She just made people feel at ease and she was easy to be around. There was something special about Gabby,” she said.

After Shayne died, Gabby was a “phenomenal help” to Kathryn, stepping up to do her share of cooking, cleaning and helping with her siblings.

“She just got stuff done, she was pragmatic, hard working and so organised,” Michelle said.

The day Gabby died she woke early and went for a walk with Kathryn – something they did most days together.

Then the pair went to Newmarket shopping and Gabby helped her mother choose a new swimsuit for an extended family holiday to Fiji in April.

The family ate lunch together and Gabby went to watch her boyfriend Bradley play softball before returning home to prepare for her party.

She didn’t drink alcohol, but prepared pina colada cocktails for her three best friends, making a rum-free version for herself.

The girls had planned to go out in the city that night; Gabby loved old music so wanted to go dancing at Irish bar Danny Doolans.

Bradley was going to pick them up and drive them to town.

Then, Gabby started to complain about having a headache.

“It was getting worse and worse,” Kathryn said.

“She just wanted to lie down. Her friends left, they told her it was okay, that they would celebrate with her another time and they called Bradley to tell him.”

After the girls left, Gabby started throwing up and became agitated and slurring her words.

Kathryn suspected a severe migraine, and called an ambulance.

As the paramedics arrived – and Bradley – Gabby lost consciousness.

She never woke up.

Doctors have told her family they believe she had a arteriovenous malformation (AVM), a tangle of abnormal blood vessels connecting arteries and veins in the brain.

It is likely she was born with the condition and there was nothing her family could have done to detect or prevent her death.

“She was healthy, she exercised, she didn’t drink,” said Kathryn, shaking her head.

“The specialist said it was like a ticking time bomb,” Jacob added.

The family said the decision to donate Gabby’s organs was easy; they knew it was what she wanted as she specified it on her licence, and she was a generous young woman.

“She had such a bright future in front of her and I would have just loved to see her future unfold,” Kathryn said.

“We said goodbye to her and we knew that she was then going off to theatre – that she was the one giving the gifts on her birthday.

“She’s given life to more than six people on her birthday, that is her legacy.”

Jacob was brimming with pride over his sister’s final gift.

“It’s like she is living on in other people,” he said.

The Marsh family urged people to openly discuss organ donation with loved ones and make their wishes known.

They hoped to one day meet some of the people that Gabby’s organs helped.

The Gabby Marsh Scholarship

Gabby’s university friends have started a Givealittle page to fund a scholarship in her name, with the support of her family.

“Gabby was passionate, fun loving and kind. She smiled easily and often. She was selfless, considerate and generous.

She was someone who impacted everyone she met,” her friends said.

“Gabby changed the lives of so many around her, and we dream for her character and kindness to continue changing the life of others.

“To honour her academic ability, her exceptional character and her future cut tragically short, the Gabby Marsh Scholarship will be established and offered annually to enable a young school leaver demonstrating exceptional character and service to fulfil their dream of studying commerce at the University of Auckland.”

More than $20,000 has been donated so far.

To donate or read more, click here.

Thanks to the generosity of 503 deceased organ donors and their families a record 1,447 Australians were given a second chance at life in 2016. There were an additional 267 living donors, including 44 under the Australian Kidney Exchange Program.

To register on the Australian Organ Donor Register, click here.

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Henry Sapiecha

Foods that will cause you cancer concerns. Do you agree??

February 28th, 2017

Some of these statements make sense others are questionable in my eyes.ENJOY.

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Farmed-Fish image www.foodpassions.net

We probably do not think the food we are eating every day might be cancer causing. However there is a clear connection between diet and cancer. As cancer became the plague of our modern age, a lot of research has been done on its prevention. With many reports on the relationship of diet to cancer available nowadays, we want to inform you about the most cancer causing foods. One part of the prevention plan is avoiding such foods, some other tips on the prevention we will discuss at the end of the article. So keep reading and stay healthy! MORE HERE

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Henry Sapiecha

Universal Cancer Vaccine Is Probably Impossible

February 27th, 2017

Cancer-Vaccine-image www.newcures (2)

The quest for vaccines to prevent cancers just hit a theoretical limit: If there ever are vaccines, there will have to be many, and not just one.

In theory, the best possible treatment for cancer would be one that required no radiation or surgery, instead using the body’s immune system to turn back a tumor’s uncontrollable growth. Recent developments in using immunotherapy to treat cancer has researchers thinking about a cancer vaccine as a potential breakthrough in prevention. But new research suggests that we shouldn’t hold out much hope for a single, universal vaccine for cancer.

While the first scientist to look at the immune system’s potential role in treating cancer conducted his research in the 1890s, it’s only in the past decade that immunotherapy has really taken off. Most famously, President Jimmy Carter was declared cancer-free in 2016 after immunotherapy was used to help treat a brain tumor. The basic principle is the same as any other disease the immune system deals with. The body’s defense mechanisms recognize the tumor as an invader and attack it, neutralizing the threat. The challenge lies in getting the immune system to see the tumor as a harmful, unwanted presence. It’s possible to do that by training the body’s immune system to recognize certain molecules in the tumor’s makeup.

A cancer vaccine would be the next big step for immunotherapy. While there are vaccines for cancers that are caused by an underlying infection — the HPV vaccine is probably the best-known example — vaccines meant to target non-infectious tumors are trickier. Some are in clinical trials to deal with specific types of cancer, but none are yet approved in the United States.

Based on researchers’ current knowledge, a cancer vaccine would require focusing on specific genetic alterations in tumors, which create molecules that the immune system can then target and attack if a tumor ever does pop up. The problem is that those alterations are different in every person, so each vaccine would have to be specifically designed and created for every individual patient. That would be expensive, likely prohibitively so.

The bad news, according to scientists at the cancer genetics research company Foundation Medicine and authors of the study, is that there doesn’t appear to be any way around that problem that would allow for the creation of a universal vaccine. They looked at the genomes of more than 60,000 different tumors to find any molecules that were the consistent result of these genetic alterations and that the immune systems could then go after. Even in the best-case scenario, the most common targets the researchers found would only be useful for about 0.3 percent of the population.

So a universal vaccine doesn’t appear to be possible, at least based on what we know right now. The researchers did point out that they only looked at the specifically cancer-causing parts of the tumor genomes, and it’s possible a currently unknown genetic alteration could be common enough to make a universal vaccine more feasible.

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Henry Sapiecha

Cystic Fibrosis sufferer and transplant patient Nardya Miller promotes organ donation in her final days of life

January 17th, 2017

A DYING Brisbane Qld Australia woman is using her final days to promote the importance of organ donation.

Last Wednesday, 25-year-old Nardya Miller was given a week to live. On Sunday she was submitted to palliative care.

Nardya Miller has been given just a week to live CYSTIC FIBROSIS-SUFFERER image www.newcures.info

The beauty salon owner has Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and her body is rejecting a double lung transplant she had over two years ago, the Sunshine Coast Daily reports.

Ms Miller’s fiance Liam Fitzgerald said it isn’t CF that is killing her, it is the chronic rejection she was diagnosed with three months ago.

“CF was a part of her life for 23 years and got her to needing a bilateral lung transplant but after the first 11 months post surgery, being so perfect, the lungs started to fail, over and over again requiring treatments she never thought she would have to go though.

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems image www.newcures.info

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems.

“She went through rounds of plasmapheresis to try stop donor specific antibodies but nothing worked.”

Mr Fitzgerald said Ms Miller wants everyone to know how important organ donation is.

“The only way people will ever have a second chance at life is to be an organ donor.”

Ms Miller’s cousin Tachae Douglas-Miller said she underwent the lung transplant in 2014 because she was “sick of not being able to breathe and sick of fighting a never ending battle”.

“Although we hear stories on how new lungs had changed people lives, Nardya wasn’t so lucky.

“After undergoing the double lung transplant she didn’t realise she was so ill.”

But instead of letting her illness get the better of her, Ms Douglas-Miller said she started up her own beauty business and bought a house with Mr Fitzgerald, adopting three “beautiful little fur babies”.

“She started to make her dream of opening her own beauty store a reality (because) she didn’t want to stop working as she didn’t want to burden her fiance with debt.

“Unfortunately now, Nardya is losing the battle …(she) won’t be going home.”

Ms Douglas-Miller and her sister Ainsley Douglas-Miller started a Go Fund Me to help keep Ms Miller’s dreams of not leaving her fiance in debt, alive.

Already more than $15,000 has been raised by more than 400 people in six days, smashing the initial $10,000 target.

“We are overwhelmed by everyone’s generosity. I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Despite only having days to live, Ms Douglas-Miller said Ms Miller is still “witty, humorous and talkative”.

“Although we all know what the reality is.”

* If you wish to donate, the details are here.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

Surviving Meningococcal: Ripu Bhatia’s Story on video

January 4th, 2017


Published on Oct 1, 2016

When Ripu contracted meningicoccal septicaemia the doctors put him into a medically induced coma while they fought to save his life. The disease took his arms and legs and his nose. On the first anniversary since contracting the disease Ripu finds himself on a challenging rehabilitation journey. He’s taught himself to play guitar, writes a popular blog, and can still host a great party. But moving beyond the psychological trauma of what’s happened to him is as hard as overcoming the physical challenges he now faces.

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Henry Sapiecha

Three children hospitalised after contracting meningococcal disease

January 4th, 2017

the-most-common-symptoms-for-meningococcal-include-high-fever-and-chills-headaches-stiff-necks-and-purple-areas-on-the-skin-that-appear-as-bruises-image-www-newcures-info

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

“The disease itself is really quite hard to get, and you need to be in very close proximity.”

“The key thing here is they are all from the same family and have all been spending a lot of time together over the holidays. They didn’t just get the infection from being at Southbank.”

It’s understood that Queensland Health is now working to trace the family’s movement over the holiday period and alert those who may have come in contact with the children.

Dr Megan Young, public health physician at Metro North Public Health Unit, confirmed the three children came from Brisbane’s northside but said the “strain of meningococcal disease has yet to be confirmed.”

“The children became ill following an extended family gathering over the holiday break and were admitted on New Year’s Day to LCCH where they continue to receive treatment,” she said.

“Those who had close contact with the children have been identified and the majority provided with information and antibiotics where appropriate.”

Know, Check, Act – Meningococcal Disease

Dr Young said the outbreak serves as a reminder to parents to keep track of their children’s immunisation history.

“The risk of contracting meningococcal disease is very low for contacts, and there is not any increase in risk to the broader community, however this a timely reminder for parents to ensure their vaccinations are up to date,” she said.

“Meningococcal C vaccination is recommended at 12 months of age and is provided free of charge under the National Immunisation Program.”

The disease which is an acute bacterial infection can turn fatal if not treated identified and treated on time and is predominately spread by coughing, sneezing, kissing and sharing food or drink.

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

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Henry Sapiecha

After Getting Two Small Nicks At The Barber, This Man Developed A Life-Altering Condition

December 25th, 2016

crowells-keloids-grew-back-image-www-newcures-info

A trip to the barber usually doesn’t result in any lasting effects aside from your hair being shorter for a little while.

For Keith Crowell, though, one shave led to years of pain and discomfort. While in the barber’s chair, Crowell suffered two small nicks, one on each side of his face. While normally these would’ve been non-issues, both cuts developed into keloids. Keloids are growths that can develop where scar tissue forms, and because Crowell’s are particularly large and painful, he has trouble breathing and hearing.

Even after two surgeries, Crowell’s keloids grew back. He has since found a doctor with a successful treatment record, but his insurance company refuses to cover the procedure, deeming it cosmetic.

Despite this, Crowell plans to undergo the surgery. He’s suffered so much already. We’re rooting for him!

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Henry Sapiecha

Hodgkin’s Disease explained here Video presentation.

December 23rd, 2016

Part 1 of 6

What Is Hodgkin’s Disease?

Hodgkin’s disease (HD) is a type of lymphoma, which is a blood cancer that starts in the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system helps the immune system get rid of waste and fight infections. HD is also called Hodgkin disease, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

HD originates in white blood cells that help protect you from germs and infections. These white blood cells are called lymphocytes. In people with HD, these cells grow abnormally and spread beyond the lymphatic system. As the disease progresses, it makes it more difficult for your body to fight infections.

HD can be either classic Hodgkin’s disease or nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s disease (NLPHD). The type of HD is based on the types of cells involved in your condition and their behavior.

The main cause of HD isn’t known. The disease has been linked to cell mutations, or changes, as well as to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which causes mononucleosis. HD can occur at any age, but it most commonly affects people between ages 15 and 40 and people over age 55.

The overall survival rate for HD has increased due to advances in treatment. The five-year survival rate is about 85 percent, and the 10-year survival rate is approximately 81 percent.

Part 2 of 6

What Are the Symptoms of Hodgkin’s Disease?

Symptoms

The most common symptom of HD is swelling of the lymph nodes, which causes a lump to form under the skin. This lump usually isn’t painful. It may form in one or more of the following areas:

  • on the side of the neck
  • in the armpit
  • around the groin

Other symptoms of HD include:

  • night sweats
  • itchy skin
  • fever
  • fatigue
  • unintended weight loss
  • persistent cough
  • pain in the lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • enlarged spleen

Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms. They can be signs of other conditions, and it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis.

Part 3 of 6

How Is Hodgkin’s Disease Diagnosed?

Diagnosis

To diagnose HD, your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask you about your medical history. Your doctor will also order certain tests to make a proper diagnosis. The following tests may be done:

  • imaging tests, such as X-rays or CT scans
  • lymph node biopsy, which involves removing a piece of lymph node tissue to test for the presence of abnormal cells
  • blood tests, such as a complete blood count (CBC), to measure levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets
  • immunophenotyping to determine the type of lymphoma cells that are present
  • lung function tests to determine how well your lungs are working
  • an echocardiogram to determine how well your heart is working
  • bone marrow biopsy, which involves the removal and examination of marrow inside your bones to see if the cancer has spread

Staging

Once an HD diagnosis has been made, the cancer is assigned a stage. Staging describes the extent and severity of the disease. It will help your doctor determine your treatment options and outlook.

There are four general stages of HD:

  • Stage I (early stage) means that cancer is found in one lymph node region.
  • Stage II (locally advanced disease) means that cancer is found in two lymph node regions on one side of the diaphragm, which is the muscle beneath your lung. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node region as well as in a nearby organ.
  • Stage III (advanced disease) means that cancer is found in lymph node regions both above and below your diaphragm. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node area and in one organ on opposite sides of your diaphragm.
  • Stage IV (widespread disease) means that cancer was found outside the lymph nodes and has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bone marrow, liver, or lung.

Part 4 of 6

How Is Hodgkin’s Disease Treated?

Treatment

Treatment for HD typically depends on the stage of the disease. The main treatment options are chemotherapy and radiation. Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams of radiation to destroy cancer cells. Chemotherapy involves the use of medications that can kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs may be given orally or injected through a vein, depending on the specific medication.

Radiation therapy alone may be sufficient for treating early stage NLPHD. If you have NLPHD, you may only need radiation since the condition tends to spread more slowly than classic HD. In advanced stages, targeted therapeutic drugs may be added to your chemotherapy regimen.

A stem cell transplant may also be used if you don’t respond to chemotherapy or radiation. A stem cell transplant infuses healthy cells called stem cells into your body to replace the cancerous cells in your bone marrow.

After treatment, your doctor will want to follow up with you on a regular basis. Be sure to keep all your medical appointments and follow your doctor’s instructions.

Part 5 of 6

Risks of Treatment for Hodgkin’s Disease

Risk Factors

Treatments for HD can have long-term side effects and can increase your risk of developing other serious medical conditions. Radiation to the chest can increase your risk of:

  • breast cancer
  • lung cancer
  • heart disease
  • high cholesterol

You should get regular mammograms, cholesterol tests, and heart disease screenings to check for these conditions.

It’s also important to attend regular follow-up appointments with your doctor. Make sure to tell them about any concerns you may have about long-term side effects and what you can do to help reduce your risk.

Part 6 of 6

Long-Term Outlook for People with Hodgkin’s Disease

Outlook

Advances in the treatment of HD over the past few decades have greatly increased the survival rate. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rates for all people diagnosed with HD are as follows:

  • The one-year survival rate is about 92 percent.
  • The five -year survival rate is about 85 percent.
  • The 10-year survival rate is about 81 percent.

The following are the five-year survival rates for the different stages:

  • Stage I HD is about 90 percent.
  • Stage II HD is about 90 percent.
  • Stage III HD is about 80 percent.
  • Stage IV HD is about 65 percent.

These rates may vary depending on the stage of the disease and the age of the individual.

Dealing with an HD diagnosis can be challenging. Support groups and counseling can help you manage your anxiety and provide a safe place for you to discuss concerns and feelings about your experience. The National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society also provide resources for people who’ve recently been diagnosed with HD.

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Henry Sapiecha

CANSEMA INDIAN BLACK SALVE TREATMENT FOR CANCERS HOW TO USE & A BREAST CANCER SUCCESS STORY

November 28th, 2016

Amazing: Woman Cures Breast Cancer with Black Salve

 Breast Cancer Tumour-3 image www.newcures.info
You’re entitled to have a giggle at this should you feel inclined to do so …
It’s now just over two weeks ago since I removed my large breast tumour using black salve. The tumour came out in 2 stages, the smaller part after 20 days and the much larger part on day 28. The day after the large part of the tumour came out I hand delivered the breast tumours to the hospital, preserved in a jar of Regan’s best polish vodka (much to his dismay). The surgeon, a very amiable Irish chap, appeared quite dumbfounded and made very little comment. I was accompanied by my mum, Eileen, who with such genuine excitement at the whole event pipes up – ‘Isn’t is marvelous doctor, hasn’t she done well?’ – to which he politely refused to comment. I was keen to have the sample sent for histology in order that it would be documented in my hospital records. He agreed to do so, and he sent a follow up letter to my GP with comments as follows…
‘This lady was seen in breast clinic today. She has a history of left breast cancer, she declined operative therapy and opted for alternative remedies.
She attended clinic today with, what appeared to be, 2 pieces of breast tissue. She had been applying herbal remedies to the area and this appears to have enucleated the tumour from the breast.
She is anxious to have these sent to the lab…I have explained that they may give us limited information as she has preserved it in vodka, but we have agreed to send it and await the outcome.’
I love that word ‘enucleated’ – I even looked it up for the official medical definition:
‘removal of tumour from surrounding tissue without rupturing’.
‘Enucleation is a surgical process during which only the tumor cells are removed.’
‘To remove (a tumor or eye, for example) whole from an enveloping cover or sac.’
I went to the breast clinic yesterday to see the surgeon to get the histology report. It confirmed the obvious, i.e. that the tissue I had removed with the black salve was cancerous breast tissue – it’s just good to have it authenticated for my medical records. I have asked for them to send me the full histology report, they agreed to post it on to me.
My wound is healing up amazingly well – it’s looking great! I am overwhelmed at the body’s capacity to heal. The hole had filled up within 3 days, new skin had covered the wound after a week, and now the wound area is reducing in size on a daily basis. I may yet go topless sunbathing again! (though not in front of my teenage son – he gets far too embarrassed).
I’m still on my strict diet and protocol, and will still be closely monitoring my left breast, especially bearing in mind I’ve still got a small tumour left in there, but I’m very confident that it’s all looking very positive.
Picture 1 – Tumour that came out on  (Day 20)
Breast Cancer Tumour-1 image www.newcures.info
Picture 2 – Tumour that came out on (Day 28)
Breast Cancer Tumour-2 image www.newcures.info
Picture 3 – The wound on  (Day 28)
Breast Cancer Tumour-3 image www.newcures.info
Picture 4 – The amazing healing process –  16 days after tumour came out 
Breast Cancer Tumor 4Breast Cancer Tumour-4 image www.newcures.info

How To Use Black Salve:

**Please Note**much of the info below was received from Alpha Omega Labs, a company that sold black salve under the commercial name “Cansema” which was very successful in treating skin cancers before the FDA shut them down. There are a select few quality black salves that are still on the market today, like those found at:

As Alpha Omega Labs stated, the products found at risingsunhealth.com and bloodrootproducts.com are NOT quality salves and are a waste of money, like many others being marketed as true black salves. As with any ailment, it is important to seek out the advice and treatment of a qualified physician. This site is purely for educational purposes. Information found in this site is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Many of the comments found on this site have not been evaluated by the FDA, FTC, AMA or any other US government regulatory agency. Please read ALL of the following information for better understanding of the process!

The medical definition of “cure” is the non-reoccurrence of pathology within five years after treatment. By the very definition used by orthodox medicine, black salve is empirically a proven cure for skin cancer for the majority of those who use the product according to our instructions.

Effective black salve ingredients include blood root and zinc chloride at a minimum. Often, black salve will also include other immune boosting herbs such as chaparral, red clover, galangal and graviola.

After Reading ALL of the directions below FIRST, you will want to watch the first video on this page:
 
1. PREPARATION
First, as stated earlier, the user may want to have a biopsy or other diagnostic procedure performed to ascertain whether or not there is, in fact, skin cancer.
Many people, on the observation that they have a “mole” or similar skin marking that is growing and getting darker, have elected to use black salves anyway. After all, black salve is selective in its action and will only “go after” neoplastic (cancerous) tissue. Healthy tissue will only redden and become mildly irritated when black salves is applied. This decision is entirely at the discretion of the user; there is no danger, toxic or otherwise, of applying black salves to healthy tissue, although doing so is simply a waste of the product.
In addition, if you are targeting more than one growth, do one at a time and never apply to a spot larger than a USA quarter.
2. APPLICATION
Black salve comes in a 1/2 oz. container. The product has the consistency of a thick, moist paste. It can easily be self-applied with the fingers and should be spread over the lesion or cancerous tissue in a thin covering, almost lightly “caked.” Wash hands thoroughly before and after applying Black salve.
The applied area will start to tingle shortly afterwards — anywhere between 5 minutes to 6 hours after the initial application. (In fact, if you feel “nothing” after three to six hours, it is most likely that nothing more will happen: Black salve has failed to come into direct contact with the cancer or there is no cancer present. If after 24 hours there is no burning, stinging or pulling sensation, you will want to remove the Black salve, follow the suggestions below in steps 2A, then  reapply, repeating this process, until the Black salve can reach and “grab” the underlying aberrant growth.) If the black salve takes hold and causes a burning, stinging or pulling sensation, then let the rest of the process play out..DO NOT WASH THE SALVE OFF, LET IT BECOME PART OF THE ESCHAR/SCAB THAT FORMS!  In some cases, there is a burning sensation with larger lesions (larger than a USA dime, so it is important to have ibuprofen, or other non-prescription pain killer, available during the process. Note: the moment the eschar falls out, usually within 7-14 days of the initial application, the pain will immediately stop! Areas larger than a square centimeter (or bigger than a U.S. “dime”) may require even stronger analgesics, which, being prescription, will require the services of a cooperative physician.
Otherwise, observing good “pain management” may require that the cancer be “taken out in stages.” This involves applying a small amount to the edge of the growth, waiting for the sensations to die down as the eschar process begins, and then repeating this process on an adjacent area of skin until the entire area has been covered. Observe this same procedure if you are targeting more than one growth.
Do one at a time. In this fashion, any discomfort is minimized because the entire process, which can at that point last several days, has been spread out over time. This bears repeating: never apply Black salve to a large area, unless you are under a physician’s care and advice.
 
It is also a good idea to place a bandage over the area, particularly if the forming eschar is on a place on the body that might be subject to being bumped or bruised in the course of daily activity. Another thing to consider is that Black salve can stain clothing, so for practical, aesthetic, and cleanliness issues, covering the site is a good idea.
” . . . I applied Black salve and no eschar appeared! . . . What do I do now?”
Black salve has to come into contact with the target cancer area in order to work. It has transdermal properties (i.e. skin penetrating ability) However, a couple of simple tricks can also speed up the process and/or reduce the number of applications required to “reach” a skin cancer that is well below the epidermis. Most people don’t need these techniques if the skin cancer is close to the skin surface. We recommend that these “tricks of the trade” only be used if an initial application does not produce results – which turns out to be a minority of cases.
2A. “Deep Loufah Wash” – Many people use a loofah sponge to rigorously wash and prepare the skin before applying Black salve Salve. This serves to remove some of the dead cells in the top layer of the epidermis (the stratum corneum), so that Black salve has less tissue through which to travel to get to the underlying cancer.
  “Needle Points” – This technique is more effective, but more invasive. It involves taking a sterilized needle and carefully making holes in the skin – about a sixteenth to eighth inch deep, very much as an acupuncturist would – except that the needle is removed as soon as the holes usually spaced about a quarter-inch apart. Following the creation of the “skin holes,” Black Salve is then (re)applied. We recommend that this technique be used by practitioners and not end users. We also advise that practitioners prep the area by rubbing peroxide (3-6%) into the freshly “pricked” skin before Black salve is (re)applied.
3. MANAGING THE ESCHAR
After 24 hours remove the bandage. Using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 – 3%, available in most drug stores) and a Q-Tip, very lightly go over the border of the lesion, removing any organic debris (i.e. puss, serous fluid, etc.) If a full pus formation is not evident or is incomplete, repeat step 2 and leave the new application on for an additional 24 hours before proceeding. Normally one application is sufficient for small tumors (the size of a pencil eraser), but no more than three applications are required for larger tumors. There are instances, however, when repeated applications of Black salve are required because of “accessibility” problems – although this can be limited using the techniques cited in the preceding section. In order to initiate the escharization process, however, and begin killing the cancer, it is vital that Black salve be able to penetrate and reach the subject site. This can take multiple (three or more) applications, though one to two applications is more common.

After the eschar has formed, keep it well protected. Once the scab has formed, you should apply the After Care Cream and continue to use until spot is completely healed.This product will insure the scaring is minimal and keep the scab moist. Normally the bandage can be left on for a period of 10 days: however, in advanced cases there is considerable “drainage,” that is, a steady emission of pus. In the sense that Black salve kills the cancer cells and takes certain leukocytes (defending white blood corpuscles) with it in the process of eliminating the neoplasm, it is a supportive agent: that is, drainage should not be viewed as abnormal. The range of possible response is very little pus and only one bandage ever required, to a regular change of bandages required in the case of advanced melanomas. Your case will be somewhere in-between.

4. REMOVING THE ESCHAR
The eschar itself represents the death of the neoplasm, and this occurs shortly after application. Everything that follows is the body’s own reparative responses. From here on out, the body knows exactly what to do and wastes no time doing it. However, to us the days and weeks that follow may seem lengthy.The next stage is the removal of the eschar, or scab. This usually happens within 10-14 days after initial application, unless the case is advanced and/or cancer(s) cover a large area of the body. As with any scab, let it fall out when it is ready. DO NOT PULL IT OUT prematurely, if you remove the eschar prematurely, you further risk developing scar tissue and the cancer root will be left behind to spread.

5. DECAVITATION & “HEALING OVER”
After the eschar comes out, the pit or “decavitation” can look raw and unsightly. You need to wipe out the healthy pink crater tissue with peroxide, then look for any embedded white spot(s) in the healthy tissue.  If you see any such spot(s), these are cancer roots and you need to immediately cover the white spot(s) only in the crater with more black salve and let the process begin again.  If no white spot(s) is/are present, keep the crater covered and there will be no threat of secondary infection. Continue to apply the After Care Cream twice daily to the area until it is fully healed over and level with the surrounding skin. If you work in an area that is less than clean, however, you might want to have hydrogen peroxide (available in any good drug store) handy and apply it liberally to the site once a day to kill any invasive germs.
Over a period of a few months, or in some cases two years, the entire area will be healed with only some “depigmentation” or scar tissue. The result is rarely more unsightly or unaesthetic than if surgery had been chosen instead.
Only in rare conditions does the cancer “come back” to the area applied, unless there is underlying metastasis. To be sure that the area is clear of cancer, many users elect to initiate a second, or even third, application after they get to the “heal over” stage. We take a dim view to doing this indiscriminately because the risk of scarring is increased with each new re-application. However, with particularly aggressive forms of cancer, such as melanoma, a user may want to weigh the potential advantages of re-application, particularly if the initial cancer is located somewhere on the body that is not usually aesthetically sensitive or viewed in public (i.e. on the back, upper leg, etc.). None of this should be taken as a substitute for using some of the better cancer marker tests that are now available from qualified, licensed physicians. In other words, if you don’t need more than one application, why do it.
In other words, once Black salve has finished its work, there are normally no residual cells from the original neoplasm. This rule finds more exceptions the larger the original cancer growth is, the deeper it is beneath the skin, the more instances of skin cancer the subject has experienced, and/or the more extensive a person’s history of skin cancer is or has been. Remember, you may need to repeat this process if the skin cancer is sufficiently extensive such that residual cancer cells have been left behind after you finish your first “cycle.” (Although, this same admonition would exist if you had your skin cancer surgically removed.) To be on the side of caution, have your health care practitioner check the site to see if there is any remaining cancer. There are excellent antigen marker tests that your physician can utilize to determine if you have a “clean bill of health.”
Update from Ann Devlin
Thank you very much for all the wonderful messages that I have received since posting information on the black salve treatment that I used recently…It is heartwarming to receive such positive messages of support, especially knowing that I may have had a positive impact on others. Since posting the information I have been inundated with comments and questions, and hundreds of friend requests. I am trying to respond but it is difficult to keep up with them, so I am having to prioritize those that appear to be most pressing. I hope you’ll understand If I don’t get chance to reply in a timely manner, I’m not being rude – there’s just not enough hours in the day! I’ve also got to still concentrate on looking after me too  I’m still recovering really well – now 4 weeks today since the main tumour came out, and the wound gets better each day. I’m still on my strict protocol: vegan diet, lots of juicing, good quality filtered water, herbal teas, homeopathy, lots of supplements including high dose Vit C, running, yoga, good quality sleep
wow flashing

What if we told you there exists a blend of herbs so powerful, effective, and safe for treating cancer that no other conventional treatment even comes close? And what if we told you this same herbal formula only targets malignant cells while leaving healthy cells and other tissue alone? The formula in question actually does exist, and it is traditionally known as Indian black salve, a “magical” cancer cure of sorts that also safely treats viruses and many other health conditions without causing harmful side effects.

If you have never heard of Indian black salve, it is probably because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not recognize it as an official cancer treatment. In fact, most medical authorities who have heard of Indian black salve reject it as any type of medical treatment because it is made from all-natural herbs that are not patented or owned by corporations, which automatically means they “do not work” in the eyes of the medical-industrial complex (even though they actually do work).

The miraculous healing power of bloodroot

But in truth, Indian black salve is one of the most powerful natural cancer treatments known to man. And this is primarily due to the fact that it contains bloodroot, a potent herb native to the United States and Canada that is already recognized amongst many in the natural health community as being effective in the treatment of warts, moles, skin tags, cherry angiomas, and skin cancer. But as it turns out, bloodroot is also effective internallyas a treatment for ovarian, breast, bladder, bone and many other cancers.

There are numerous Indian black salve blends available, and all of them contain bloodroot and several other prominent healing herbs. Lifeline Water, for instance, sells a potent, alcohol-free Indian black salve formula that contains not only bloodroot but yellow dock, licorice, galangal, zinc chloride, and Lifeline Water. You can learn more about this amazing product here:
http://www.lifelinewater.com/herb.html

You may also remember the saga of herbalist Greg Caton, who we previously reported had been illegally kidnapped and extradited from Ecuador for his involvement in producing natural cancer-cure herbal products (http://www.naturalnews.com/Greg_Caton.html). Caton’s Alpha Omega Labs, which still operates out of Ecuador due to medical tyranny here in the U.S., also sells herbal products similar to Indian black salve that contain healing bloodroot: http://www.herbhealers.com/

How does Indian black salve work, and how should you use it?

Since mainstream medicine continues to deny the therapeutic value of Indian black salve, little is known about how it actually works. But many people have successfully used it both externally and internally to treat all types of cancer, viral infections, gastrointestinal problems, and other conditions. Topically, Indian black salve can be applied directly to malignancies for rapid healing. Lifeline Water recommends mixing three grams of Indian black salve with four ounces of natural or bee pollen cream.

Internally, mixing a small amount of Indian salve paste about the size of half of an English pea in water or putting it into a capsule and taking it either once or twice a day, on a full stomach, can help effectively treat and eliminate cancer in as few as 20 days. Though the company is not permitted by law to explain these healing details with customers, many have used Indian black salve successfully to treat their cancers.

Natural News is exercising its free speech rights to share this information with you, and we have absolutely no financial or other connection with Lifeline Water or any other company offering Indian black salve. We are merely informing you about this amazing healing compound for your own benefit, should you or a loved one develop an “incurable” condition like cancer that cannot be treated using conventional methods.

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Henry Sapiecha