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Archive for June, 2013

VAMPIRE BAT VENOM COULD BE THE ANSWER TO BLOOD PRESSURE PROBLEMS

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

VAMPIRE BAT VENOM ANTICOAGULANTS TO BE USED FOR DRUG DEVELOPMENT

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Vampire bat venom could prove the key ingredient in future medication for stroke and high blood pressure after an international team of scientists identified ”a whole suite” of ways bats prevent blood from clotting.

Led by the University of Queensland’s Bryan Fry, the researchers found three new types of anticoagulants and two new compounds that open arteries in the skin to increase blood flow.

Discovered in the venom of the common vampire bat from Central and South America, Professor Fry said the compounds had significant potential for future drug design and development.

”We found a whole suite of novel stuff in the venom,” Professor Fry said. ”There are things that are blocking clot aggregation which would obviously be very good for potential blood thinners.”

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Professor Fry said he was surprised to see how complex and diverse the venom was – one class of anti-platelet compounds had 50 different versions. Such variety makes the venom particularly efficient, as it is unlikely the animal being bitten repeatedly will develop antibodies to each of the 50 strains.

The results, published in the Journal of Proteomics, also identified novel compounds which are yet to be fully understood.

Taipan.A preserved taipan.

”It just goes to show you need to preserve everything because you can’t predict where the next wonder drug will come from. It could be from something as unlikely as this creature of nightmares.”

Professor Fry said synthetic versions of the compounds could be made for use in follow-up studies and ultimately drug production. He said some of the compounds could be longer-lasting or more potent anticoagulants than those used in existing treatments.

”It’s an exciting, new, rich resource,” he said.

There are three types of vampire bats but researchers concentrated on the common vampire bat because it is considered the most evolved.

■ Meanwhile: snakes, redback spiders, platypuses and jellyfish are among the creatures on display at an exhibition on Australia’s history of pioneering research into antivenom.

The free exhibition, Venom: Fear, Fascination and Discovery, is on at Melbourne University’s Medical History Museum until July 20. See museum.medicine.unimelb.edu.au for more information.

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Henry Sapiecha

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WILL CANNABIS FIX YOUR DISEASE OR ERRADICATE PAIN, THEN VIEW THIS DOCUMENTARY VIDEO

Monday, June 10th, 2013

CANNABIS CURES EXPLAINED IN THIS VIDEO

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Henry Sapiecha

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MOGELLANS DISEASE CURE CLAIM IN THESE VIDEOS USING COMMON HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

Saturday, June 8th, 2013

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Henry Sapiecha

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DOG VIDEO SHOWS DOG GIVES BIRTH TO PUP WITH HUMAN FEATURES

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

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Henry Sapiecha

HUMAN BORN FROM APE SURROGATE SHOWN IN THIS VIDEO

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

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Henry Sapiecha

VIDEO SHOWS NEWBORN PIGLET WITH HUMAN HEAD

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

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Henry Sapiecha

OLDER HEARTS GET YOUNGER WITH THE USE OF GDF 11 PROTEIN

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

AGED HEARTS IN MICE REVERSED WITH THE USE OF GDF 11 PROTEIN

HEART MODEL

June 3 – Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have identified a blood protein they say can reverse the aging process in mouse hearts. After introducing the protein into the hearts of old mice, the scientists say they saw the organs ‘grow younger’ before their eyes, results that could eventually help in the treatment of human heart disease.

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Research published yesterday in the journal Cell (abstract) by Richard Lee and Amy Wagers of Harvard has isolated GDF-11 as a negative regulator of age-associated cardiac hypertrophy. ‘When the protein … was injected into old mice, which develop thickened heart walls in a manner similar to aging humans, the hearts were reduced in size and thickness, resembling the healthy hearts of younger mice.’ Through a type of transfusion called parabiotic or ‘shared circulation’ in mice — one old and sick, the other young and well — they managed to reverse this age-associated heart disease. From there, they isolated an active agent, GDF-11, present in the younger mouse but absent in the older, which reverses the condition when administered directly. They are also using the agent to restore other aged/diseased tissues and organs. Human applications are expected within six years. Since the basis for the treatment is ordinary sharing of blood between an older ill, and younger healthy patient, we can probably expect someone to start offering the transfusion treatment somewhere in the world, soon, to those with the means to find a young and healthy volunteer

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Henry Sapiecha

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