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Archive for November, 2014

LET FASTING REGULARLY EVERY WEEK SET THE PATERN FOR A HEALTHIER & LONGER LIFE

Friday, November 28th, 2014

 

The 5:2 diet helps beat cancer and Alzheimer’s, study finds

THE 3 FAT MAN IMAGE www.newcures.info

The common eating pattern in modern societies, of three meals per day plus snacks, is actually “abnormal”.

Fasting regimes such as the ‘5:2’ diet could help the body guard against diseases including cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s, according to a new study.

The common eating pattern in modern societies, of three meals per day plus snacks, is actually “abnormal” in terms of human evolution, and is at-odds with the body’s natural rhythms, the paper finds.

The study, a review of a wide range of scientific research into the effects of limiting calorie intake on the human body, calls for doctors to encourage patients to adopt ‘intermittent energy restriction’ diets such as the 5:2 diet, where participants eat normally for five days and then eat no more than 500 calories for two days.

Such eating patterns are in fact much more consistent with that of wild animals and “hunter-gatherer humans [who] rarely, if ever, suffer from obesity, diabetes, and cardio-vascular disease.”

Entitled ‘Meal frequency and timing in health and disease‘, the paper is published today in PNAS, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the USA.

It surveys over 80 scientific papers spanning biology, neuroscience and oncology into the relationship between meal timings, food quantities and human health.

Fasting, or radically cutting calorie intake, can help the body break down fat and repair cells, reversing the ageing process, shrinking tumours and guarding neurons against damage caused by neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

The paper says: “For many of our ancestors, food was scarce and primarily consumed during daylight hours, leaving long hours of overnight fasting.

“With the advent of affordable artificial lighting and industrialisation, modern humans began to experience prolonged hours of illumination every day and resultant extended consumption of food.”

Disruption of the body’s natural body clock, or “circadian rhythms”, encouraged humans, and domesticated animals, to eat more, making them more susceptible to obesity and associated diseases, the authors say.

The authors include experts from the National Institute of Aging in Baltimore and Harvard Medical School in the US, and the Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention Centre at Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester.

Dr Michelle Harvie, research dietician at Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention and co-author of the paper, said: “There are many myths and assumptions concerning diet and eating patterns, including the belief that a healthy lifestyle should involve three square meals, plus snacks, every day.

“However, this common eating pattern is in fact abnormal from an evolutionary perspective. Emerging studies suggest that intermittent periods of energy restriction can in fact improve health and even counteract disease processes, such as the development of breast cancer.

“As more research is done into the relationship between meal frequency and health, it’s important that these eating patterns are incorporated into standard health care policies and that the general population knows how to adapt their diets and lifestyles appropriately.

Henry Sapiecha

Sarah Wilson personal issues with auto-immune disease and what came of it.

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

Sarah Wilson auto-immune disease image-3 www.newcures.info

Sarah Wilson is well known for her ‘I Quit Sugar’ movement. 

I’VE wrestled with an auto-immune disease for half my life.

I got Graves disease (an overactive thyroid which saw my hair fall out and 15kg drop off my quite slight frame in less than four weeks) when I was 21. I “cured” myself via diet and rest. At 27, I then got Graves disease in my left eye. Random, yes. I had that Jeff Goldblum bulgy-eye thing going on …in one eye. Again, I “cured” myself, this time with diet and acupuncture, in the time it took for me to get to the top of the operation wait list (three month).

Then, five years ago, I was stopped dead in my tracks with Hashimoto’s, or underactive thyroid. I was the editor of one of the biggest magazines in the country at the time. But wound my health down until I was left infertile, unable to walk or work. Since then I’ve been on a slow slog of a mission to “cure” myself again.

I looked into gluten, cosmetic toxins and, of course, sugar as causes. I investigated hereditary factors, too. My grandmother had both Graves and Hashimoto’s. Of course, all such factors contribute to the knotted ball of wool that makes up my illness. But try as I have, I’ve not been able to extract the start of the thread. I haven’t been able to pinpoint the original physical cause. Was it from being raised on my poor family’s diet of day-old bread (pretty much a staple of my childhood; Mum bought it using a pig farmer’s licence for 10 cents a loaf)? Was it my insomnia that I developed aged 8? Was it the mercury I played with in the tool shed as a kid? Am I a canary down the mineshaft for our toxic planet? All questions I know pretty much all 23 million (and growing, fast) auto-immune disease sufferers in the US ask daily. (Australian figures are at one and a half million … and rising.)

Over 20 years of wrestling and putting on a bright face and having “thyroid days” that leave me unable to leave a dark room, I’ve come to learn if there is such a cause, it’s definitely got an emotional basis.

Sarah Wilson auto-immune disease image-2 www.newcures.info

Sarah Wilson was the editor of Cosmopolitan magazine and has been the host of MasterChef. Source: Supplied

When I’m asked, as I often am, “What caused your disease?” I have to be frank and say – once all angles are ironed out – everything points to … anxiety. Or as I like to put it, a profound, visceral, itchy dis-ease with myself.

I always say that I can spot an “auto-immune type”. They have an intensity about them, a desire to impress. They’re always the ones at the front of my lectures, frantically taking notes. They have an air of ‘I’m not good enough as I am’. I know as I write this, many heads out there are nodding.

A while back I watched TED talk by Dr. Habib Sadeghi, an American “healer to the stars”, in which he cites self-hatred as the real cause of chronic disease, particularly in women.

It rung loud and true for me. Singling out women might strike as you odd. But the US National Institute of Health estimates 75 per cent of auto-immune sufferers are women.

The disparity between men and women is even worse when you look at Hashimoto’s (10 women have the illness for every one man).

The occurrence of auto-immune disease is so prevalent among women that a study published in 2000 declared it the tenth leading cause of death for all women, across all categories, between the ages of 15 and 64.

The gist goes like this…

* Illness is what happens when women, the nurturers of humanity, forget how to nurture themselves. Word!

* He draws parallels to dirt. Excessive ploughing and unmindful practices by farmers ruins the grass that keeps our soil grounded and healthy. Land is then left barren, exposed, degraded and stripped of its life-giving power. Which means when hard times strike – like a severe drought – the once-nutrient rich soil becomes lifeless dirt, devoid of any nourishing or nurturing capabilities. There’s no resilience. And humanity starves.

Got the parallel with self-care?

* So, when we don’t have the proper tools to nurture our grassland – our spiritual ecosystem, if you will – the soil of our soul becomes exposed to negative stuff. And humanity starves.

“It dries up, loses its nourishing capabilities and blows away, leaving us completely ungrounded. How many people do you know who are flighty, scattered or addicted to drama? They’ve lost their resilience, the ability to nourish and nurture their soul through the ups and downs of life.”

* What does it mean to nourish our grassland? My take is this: not constantly doubting and putting the breaks on emotions, innocently and authentically responding to things, being able to cradle and accommodate our own (sometimes extreme and erratic etc) emotional responses rather than relying on external things (other people, drugs, gurus). So that we don’t “end up living in a spiritual dustbowl of self-judgment, hopelessness, and cynicism”

Sarah Wilson auto-immune disease image-1 www.newcures.info

Sarah has tried to heal herself with healthy eating but believes the real cause of her illness is anxiety.

* Self-hatred is the biggest impediment to cradling ourselves, especially in women. This self-hatred emerges from thinking we’re not adhering to the ideals set out for us.

“We’re constantly putting women up against standards they can’t possibly meet. When you can’t be the ideal wife, mother, girlfriend, teacher, cook, church volunteer, corporate executive and activist at 20 pounds below your healthy body weight, what’s left but to silently (and subconsciously) hate yourself because you’re not perfect?”

And so … self-hatred causes auto-immune disease, which, boiled down, is the body attacking itself.

So how to heal?

With self-love. I rarely know what this means and it mostly seems a bit “motherhoody” to me. But I can see how key it is. You can do all the tests, elimination diets and treatments you like, but, boil it all down, there’s always a sneaking feeling that it’s more than the gluten or the toxin or the hereditary predisposition. Right?

Sometimes I sit and really feel what’s behind a flare up. The only feeling there, behind the pain and shittiness, is a cringy, self-flagellating, forward-lunging anxiety. It’s always there, whatever the flare. The same feeling.

So in some ways the solution is really much simpler and life-enriching than constantly seeking a cure, a fix.

As one of my favourite quotes reads: “There’s no need to fear the future because we know that so long as constant change is life’s nature, survival doesn’t go to the fittest, but to the most resilient—and resiliency always resides in the richest soil.”

Henry Sapiecha

TAPEWORM LIVED IN MAN’S BRAIN FOR 4 YEARS

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

tapeworm image www.newcures.info

A tapeworm … A man lived with a aparasite in his brain for four years before it was killed by drugs. Picture: Getty Images

SCIENTISTS in Britain have removed and studied a rare tapeworm that lived in a man’s brain for four years, researchers say.

The “10cm ribbon-shaped” parasite travelled five centimetres from the right side of the brain to the left.

The tapeworm causes sparganosis, an inflammation of body tissues that can cause seizures, memory loss and headaches when it occurs in the brain.

The 50-year-old man went to his doctor in 2008 complaining of headaches, seizures, memory loss and that his sense of smell had changed, The Telegraph reported. Over the next four year the man was tested for a number of diseases including HIV, lime disease and syphilis.

Tapeworm . Brain scans show the parasites movement in the mans brain over time. Picture Genome Biology 2014 image www.newcures.info

Tapeworm … Brain scans show the parasite’s movement in the man’s brain over time. Picture: Genome Biology 2014

Surgeons removed it and the patient, of Chinese decent who lives in East Anglia, is now “systemically well”, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute said on Friday.

It was the first time the tapeworm, Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, was reported in Britain. Only 300 cases have been reported since 1953.

The tapeworm is thought to be caught by accidentally eating small infected crustaceans from lakes, eating raw amphibian or reptile meat, or by using a raw frog poultice which is a Chinese remedy for sore eyes.

“We did not expect to see an infection of this kind in the UK, but global travel means that unfamiliar parasites do sometimes appear,” said Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas of the department of Infectious Disease at Addenbrooke’s NHS Trust.

Lived inside brain four years. Microscopic images of the recovered tapeworm image www.newcures.info

Lived inside brain four years … Microscopic images of the recovered tapeworm. Picture: Genome Biology

The team managed to sequence the rare parasite’s genome for the first time, allowing them to examine potential treatments.

“Our work shows that, even with only tiny amounts of DNA from clinical samples, we can find out all we need to identify and characterise the parasite,” Gkrania-Klotsas added.

The doctor said the DNA study underlined the importance of a global database of worm genomes, to help identify and treat parasites.

“This worm is quite mysterious and we don’t know everything about what species it can infect or how. Humans are a rare and accidental host. for this particular worm. It remains as a larva throughout the infection. We know from the genome that the worm has fatty acid binding proteins that might help it scavenge fatty acids and energy from its environment, which may be one the mechanisms for how it gets its food,” Dr Hayley Bennett told The Guardian.

“This genome will act as a reference, so that when new treatments are developed for the more common tapeworms, scientists can cross-check whether they are also likely to be effective against this very rare infection.”

Henry Sapiecha