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Archive for January, 2017

Cystic Fibrosis sufferer and transplant patient Nardya Miller promotes organ donation in her final days of life

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

A DYING Brisbane Qld Australia woman is using her final days to promote the importance of organ donation.

Last Wednesday, 25-year-old Nardya Miller was given a week to live. On Sunday she was submitted to palliative care.

Nardya Miller has been given just a week to live CYSTIC FIBROSIS-SUFFERER image www.newcures.info

The beauty salon owner has Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and her body is rejecting a double lung transplant she had over two years ago, the Sunshine Coast Daily reports.

Ms Miller’s fiance Liam Fitzgerald said it isn’t CF that is killing her, it is the chronic rejection she was diagnosed with three months ago.

“CF was a part of her life for 23 years and got her to needing a bilateral lung transplant but after the first 11 months post surgery, being so perfect, the lungs started to fail, over and over again requiring treatments she never thought she would have to go though.

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems image www.newcures.info

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems.

“She went through rounds of plasmapheresis to try stop donor specific antibodies but nothing worked.”

Mr Fitzgerald said Ms Miller wants everyone to know how important organ donation is.

“The only way people will ever have a second chance at life is to be an organ donor.”

Ms Miller’s cousin Tachae Douglas-Miller said she underwent the lung transplant in 2014 because she was “sick of not being able to breathe and sick of fighting a never ending battle”.

“Although we hear stories on how new lungs had changed people lives, Nardya wasn’t so lucky.

“After undergoing the double lung transplant she didn’t realise she was so ill.”

But instead of letting her illness get the better of her, Ms Douglas-Miller said she started up her own beauty business and bought a house with Mr Fitzgerald, adopting three “beautiful little fur babies”.

“She started to make her dream of opening her own beauty store a reality (because) she didn’t want to stop working as she didn’t want to burden her fiance with debt.

“Unfortunately now, Nardya is losing the battle …(she) won’t be going home.”

Ms Douglas-Miller and her sister Ainsley Douglas-Miller started a Go Fund Me to help keep Ms Miller’s dreams of not leaving her fiance in debt, alive.

Already more than $15,000 has been raised by more than 400 people in six days, smashing the initial $10,000 target.

“We are overwhelmed by everyone’s generosity. I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Despite only having days to live, Ms Douglas-Miller said Ms Miller is still “witty, humorous and talkative”.

“Although we all know what the reality is.”

* If you wish to donate, the details are here.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

Surviving Meningococcal: Ripu Bhatia’s Story on video

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017


Published on Oct 1, 2016

When Ripu contracted meningicoccal septicaemia the doctors put him into a medically induced coma while they fought to save his life. The disease took his arms and legs and his nose. On the first anniversary since contracting the disease Ripu finds himself on a challenging rehabilitation journey. He’s taught himself to play guitar, writes a popular blog, and can still host a great party. But moving beyond the psychological trauma of what’s happened to him is as hard as overcoming the physical challenges he now faces.

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Henry Sapiecha

Three children hospitalised after contracting meningococcal disease

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

the-most-common-symptoms-for-meningococcal-include-high-fever-and-chills-headaches-stiff-necks-and-purple-areas-on-the-skin-that-appear-as-bruises-image-www-newcures-info

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

“The disease itself is really quite hard to get, and you need to be in very close proximity.”

“The key thing here is they are all from the same family and have all been spending a lot of time together over the holidays. They didn’t just get the infection from being at Southbank.”

It’s understood that Queensland Health is now working to trace the family’s movement over the holiday period and alert those who may have come in contact with the children.

Dr Megan Young, public health physician at Metro North Public Health Unit, confirmed the three children came from Brisbane’s northside but said the “strain of meningococcal disease has yet to be confirmed.”

“The children became ill following an extended family gathering over the holiday break and were admitted on New Year’s Day to LCCH where they continue to receive treatment,” she said.

“Those who had close contact with the children have been identified and the majority provided with information and antibiotics where appropriate.”

Know, Check, Act – Meningococcal Disease

Dr Young said the outbreak serves as a reminder to parents to keep track of their children’s immunisation history.

“The risk of contracting meningococcal disease is very low for contacts, and there is not any increase in risk to the broader community, however this a timely reminder for parents to ensure their vaccinations are up to date,” she said.

“Meningococcal C vaccination is recommended at 12 months of age and is provided free of charge under the National Immunisation Program.”

The disease which is an acute bacterial infection can turn fatal if not treated identified and treated on time and is predominately spread by coughing, sneezing, kissing and sharing food or drink.

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

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Henry Sapiecha