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Archive for April, 2017

Italian neuroscientist intends bringing frozen brains back to life

Friday, April 28th, 2017

London: A neuroscientist claims he will be able to “wake up” people who have been cryogenically frozen within three years, by transferring their brains to donor bodies.

Sergio Canavero, director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, has already announced plans to carry out the first human head transplant, an operation which he claims is just 10 months away.

But he is now thinking further ahead, and wants to begin brain transplants within three years.

If the procedures are successful, he believes that frozen brains could be thawed and inserted into a donor, effectively bringing “dead” people back to life.

Hundreds of people who were dying or paralysed have had their bodies or brains cryogenically preserved in the hope that medical science will one day be able to cure their conditions.

Although many experts are sceptical that the brain can be thawed without damage, Professor Canavero said he planned to awaken patients frozen by the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, which is based in Arizona.

“As soon as the first human head transplant has taken place, no later than 2018, we will be able to attempt to reawaken the first frozen head,” he said.

“We are currently planning the world’s first brain transplant, and I consider it realistic that we will be ready in three years at the latest.”

British scientists are sceptical about whether the brain could be fully restored from frozen.

Clive Coen, professor of neuroscience at King’s College London, said the chances of bringing a brain back was “infinitesimal”.

Dr Channa Jayasena, clinical senior lecturer at Imperial College London added: “It is currently not possible to freeze and thaw human tissue without killing many cells contained within it.”

Professor Canavero is working with a Chinese team of doctors led by Dr Ren Xiaoping, of Harbin Medical Centre, who helped perform the first successful hand transplant in the US.

Although Russian computer scientist Valery Spiridonov, who has spinal muscular atrophy, had volunteered to become the first head transplant patient, the team expects the first operation to be with a Chinese donor and patient.

Last year, the team announced a successful head transplant performed on a monkey.

Telegraph, London

DEADLY BRAIN CANCER & STILL ALIVE AFTER 6 YEARS-DOCTORS SAID ONLY WEEKS..!!

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

Grant Sanderson was diagnosed with brain cancer image www.newcures.info

WHEN Grant Sanderson was diagnosed with brain cancer six years ago, he was told that without immediate treatment, he had less than a week to live.

Today the Yengarie man and his fiancee, Sheridan Mosk, are eagerly awaiting the arrival of their miracle baby, which was conceived naturally despite fears that the treatment Grant had undergone would mean he would be unable to have children.

Grant was diagnosed with stage 4 glioblastoma multiforme brain cancer in 2011.

He underwent surgery, followed by chemotherapy and radiation and was told the treatment would extend his life by about 18 months.

But six years on, Grant is proving the doctors wrong.

“No one has ever survived past two years of this cancer at that size in Australia,” Sheridan said.

“He is the first person in Australia to beat brain cancer of this severity.”

Last year Sheridan and Grant met and “instantly fell in love”.

“It was like our souls saw each other and kind of went, ‘oh, there you are, I’ve been waiting for you’.

“Grant is the kindest person I have ever met and also the biggest dork I have ever met. He has such a contagious smile.”

The two are now happily expecting the arrival of their child in October.

“Our beautiful baby which is baking away was conceived 100% naturally, which again is a beautiful miracle considering what Daddy has been through with his chemo and radiation.

“If anyone deserves to be a father, it’s this man.”

Sheridan said they wanted to share Grant’s story to inspire others who were undergoing cancer treatment and their families going through it with them.

“If anything we hope someone can draw some strength from our story.

“Cancer does not discriminate, it attacks little children, it attacks mums and dads, nannies and poppies and it doesn’t care how much you need them either. But no matter – even if given the heart-wrenching diagnosis of terminal cancer, that cannot take away your ability to have faith.

“You can fight and win. Grant is walking, talking proof of that.”

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Henry Sapiecha

Cure for blindness: Tooth sewn into man’s eyeball restores his full sight

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

A BLIND man has had his eyesight completely restored by Sydney surgeons — who sewed his tooth into his eyeball.

The risky but remarkable procedure involved planting a tiny lens inside the tooth, which now reflects light onto the back of the eye.

By using the patient’s own tooth, it ensures the body doesn’t reject it.

The operation, known as osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis, was recently performed twice at Sydney Eye Hospital, with one of the procedures being carried out on 72-year-old Goulburn man John Ings.

Mr Ings, whose procedure will feature on Channel 9’s 60 Minutes tonight, had progressively lost his sight as a result of the herpes virus. His vision has now been restored by the breakthrough operation.

Goulburn man John Ings’ vision has been restored. image www.newcures.info

The second patient, 50-year-old Cairns woman Leonie Garrett, has also had her sight improved, from barely being able to see the difference between light and dark to now having 20/20 vision.

The operation, which treats corneal blindness, is the only one of its kind being performed in the southern hemisphere.

It was carried out by two former classmates of the University of NSW, oral and maxillofacial specialist Dr Shannon Webber and oculoplastic surgeon Dr Greg Moloney.

How the tooth eyeball procedure works.image www.newcures.info

How the procedure works.

The pair trained extensively in Germany to learn the procedure, which has been performed there on a handful of occasions since it was first tried in 2004. A German specialist came to Australia to supervise the two operations.

The procedure is broken down into two stages. First the patient’s tooth is extracted, a hole is drilled through it and a small plastic lens is placed inside.

It is then sewn into the patient’s cheek, where it grows tissue over a period of several months.

“We rely on the tooth to gain its own blood and tissue supply so when it is removed from the mouth, what you have essentially is a living complex,” Dr Webber said.

The groundbreaking eye tooth operation is performed by Sydney surgeons image www.newcures.info

The groundbreaking operation is performed by Sydney surgeons.

Picture: 60 Minutes

John Ings after the successful eye operation image www.newcures.info

John Ings after the successful operation. Picture: 60 Minutes

A flap of skin and mucus membrane from inside the mouth is then sewn over the eyeball.

Three months later, the tooth lens is removed from the cheek and sewn over the patient’s blind eyeball, then covered with the flap of skin. An opening is made to allow the new lens to see out.

It projects light onto the patient’s macular, in the back of the eye, much as happens with the lens of a healthy cornea.

The tooth which helped restore Mr Ings’ sight.image www.newcures.info

The tooth which helped restore Mr Ings’ sight. Picture: 60 Minutes

Both Dr Maloney and Dr Webber now expect to operate two or three times a year in Australia through the public health system at Sydney Eye Hospital.

“It’s pretty incredible and something we have been building towards for several years,” Dr Webber said.

“So to have done it successfully on two occasions is extremely satisfying. Both patients are doing really well and Leonie, in particular, is an amazing case because she had virtually no ability to see at all.

“We anticipate doing two to three of these surgeries a year and it will really come down to a supply and demand thing.”

Each patient would be assessed by Sydney Eye Hospital.

For Mr Ings, the successful surgery now means he is able to watch his own procedure on television tonight — something that would not have been possible six months ago.

“Before the operation I wouldn’t have been able to watch anything,” he said yesterday.

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Henry Sapiecha

 

Best and Worst Foods for Your Liver

Sunday, April 9th, 2017

internal-liver-sketch image www.newcures.info

1…Oatmeal

berry_nut_oatmeal-bowl image www.foodpassions.net

Food with lots of fibre can help your liver work at its best. Want one that’s a great way to start your day? Try oatmeal. Research shows it can help you shed some extra pounds and belly fat, which is a good way to keep away liver disease.

2…Stay Away From Fatty Foods

neon-drive_thru_sign image www.foddpassions.net

French fries and burgers are a poor choice to keep your liver healthy. Eat too many foods that are high in saturated fat and it can make it harder for your liver to do its job. Over time it may lead to inflammation, which in turn could cause scarring of the liver that’s known as cirrhosis. So next time you’re in the drive-thru line, think about ordering a healthier option.

3…Broccoli

broccoli_greens_mix image www.foodpassions.net

Add lots of veggies to your diet if you want to keep your liver healthy. Broccoli can be part of this strategy. Some studies suggest this crunchy food can help protect you from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. If steamed broccoli sounds a little too blah, shred it into a slaw and toss it with sliced almonds, dried cranberries, and a tangy vinaigrette. It’s also delicious roasted with garlic and a splash of balsamic vinegar.

4…Coffee

couple_having_coffee image www.foodpassions.net

If you can’t make it through the day without it, you’ll be glad to hear that it may have some benefits for your liver. Studies show that drinking two to three cups a day can protect your liver from damage caused by too much alcohol or an unhealthy diet. Some research suggests it may lower your risk of liver cancer.

5…Ease Up on Sugar

white-sugar_dunes image www.foodpassions.net

Too much of the sweet stuff can take a toll on your liver. That’s because part of its job is to convert sugar into fat. If you overdo it, your liver makes too much fat, which ends up hanging around where it doesn’t belong. In the long run, you could get a condition like fatty liver disease. So do your liver a favor and make sweets an occasional treat.

6…Green Tea

pouring_cup_hot_green_tea image www.foodpassions.net

It’s brimming with a type of antioxidant called catechins. Research suggests it may protect against some forms of cancer, including liver. You’ll get more catechins if you brew tea yourself and drink it hot. Iced tea and ready-to-drink green teas have much lower levels.

7…Water

woman_drinking_glass_of_water image www.foodpassions.net

One of the best things you can do for your liver is to keep a healthy weight. Get in the habit of drinking water instead of sweetened drinks like sodas or sports drinks. You’d be amazed at how many calories it will save you each day.

8…Almonds

bowl_of_almonds image www.foodpassions.net

Nuts — especially these — are good sources of vitamin E, a nutrient that research suggests may help protect against fatty liver disease. Almonds are good for your heart, too, so grab a handful the next time you feel like snacking. Or try them in salads, where they add a nice crunch.

9…Put a Cap on Salt

hand_holding_salt_shaker image www.foodpassions.net

Your body needs some salt — just not nearly as much as you probably get. Early research suggests a diet high in sodium may lead to fibrosis, which is the first stage of liver scarring. There are some easy things you can do to cut back. Avoid processed foods like bacon or deli meats. Choose fresh instead of canned veggies. And keep temptation at arm’s length by taking your salt shaker off the table.

10..Spinach

spinach_salad_with_fruit_walnuts image www.foodpassions.net

Leafy greens have a powerful antioxidant called glutathione, which can help keep your liver working right. And spinach couldn’t be easier to prepare. It makes a great base for a dinner salad, and it’s also delicious sauteed with garlic and olive oil. When it’s wilted, top it with a dusting of fresh parmesan.

11..Blueberries

bowls_of_fresh_blueberries image www.foodpassions.net

They’ve got nutrients in them called polyphenols that may help protect you against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which often goes hand in hand with obesity and high cholesterol. If blueberries aren’t your thing, other foods rich in polyphenols include dark chocolate, olives, and plums

12…Be Moderate With Alcohol

woman_relaxing_with_glass_of_wine image www.dfoodpassions.net

Drinking too much can wreak havoc on your liver. Over time it can lead to cirrhosis. Even occasional binge drinking — four drinks in one sitting for women and five for men — can be harmful, too. Try to limit yourself to one drink a day if you’re a woman or two a day if you’re a man.

13..Herbs and Spices

variety_of_herbs_and_spices image www.foodpassions.net

Want to protect your liver and your heart at the same time? Sprinkle on some oregano, sage, or rosemary. They’re a good source of healthy polyphenols. An extra benefit: they help you cut back on salt in many recipes. Cinnamon, curry powder, and cumin are good ones to try, too.

14..Limit Packaged Snack Foods

cup_of_mixed_fruit_on_desk image www.foodpassions.net

Next time you feel the call of the vending machine, reach for a healthy snack instead. The problem with chips and baked goods is that they’re usually loaded with sugar, salt, and fat. Cutting back is a relatively easy diet tweak with a little planning. One good strategy: Bring a stash of healthy snacks with you to work. Try an apple with a single-serve packet of nut butter, or sugar snap peas with a mini-cup of hummus.

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Henry Sapiecha