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Archive for June, 2017

The Signs & Symptoms of Pancreatic Cancer here.

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

Pancreatic cancer is the ninth most common cancer death in women and the fourth in terms of both men and women. According to recent research the five year survival rate for those diagnosed early is only 8% and this drops to 3% for those diagnosed at an advanced stage. This is mainly due to the fact that this type of cancer is extremely difficult to diagnose and is usually discovered when it’s advanced to an almost incurable stage.

So what is pancreatic cancer? Pancreatic cancer is a disease where the healthy cells within the pancreas stop working as they should, and begin to grow at an uncontrollable rate. As the cancerous cells begin to build up, they form tumors that can begin spreading to other parts of the body. When pancreatic tumors advance to a large enough size, they begin to impact the function of other organs. This can result in digestive problems as the stomach begins to produce too much acid, as well as issues with the liver and bile production.

According to medical experts there are two types of pancreatic cancers: exocrine tumors and endocrine tumors. Exocrine are the most common and these tumors start by growing in the ducts of the pancreas. As for endocrine, these are also known as “islet cell tumors” and can still function despite the cancer. However, only 1% of pancreatic cancer patients suffer from endocrine tumors.

Due to the fact that pancreatic cancer is so difficult to diagnose, we thought it would be important to provide the most common signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer below. Remember, the key to maintaining a healthy body is not only exercise and nutrition, but making sure you pay attention to what your body is telling you on a day-to-day basis. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is best to consult with your primary care physician.

Henry Sapiecha

Australian Case of Serogroup Y Invasive Meningococcal Disease

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

QUEENSLAND Health [Australia] has confirmed a case of the deadly, invasive meningococcal disease on the Sunshine Coast with another possible case being monitored.

The confirmed case was not a strain of the dangerous bacteria children would be routinely vaccinated against.

It was a notification of “serogroup Y invasive meningococcal disease”.

Children were vaccinated against the meningococcal C as part of routine childhood immunisations.

Sunshine Coast GP Dr Mason Stevenson said he also had concerns he had a case of “meningism” in a young child yesterday.

Meningisms is a set of symptoms similar to those caused by meningitis.

“I had child yesterday came in with meningisms, the child may have had early meningitis.

“I advised the parents to take the child to hospital if its condition deteriorated further.”

The Australian Department of Health website advised up to one in 10 patients with “invasive meningococcal disease in Australia dies”.

” Of those who survive, one in 30 has severe skin scarring or loss of limbs, and one in 30 has severe brain damage.”

Sunshine Coast toddler Finn Smith nearly died and lost parts of his limbs when he contracted the deadly meningococcal

Dr Stevenson said there was a rise in cases of meningococcal world-wide and a growing push to immunise people against the different strains of the disease.

“We are seeing an emergence of other strains,” he said.

“It can affect a diverse range of ages, particularly the elderly.

“There is a meningococcal vaccine that covers a range of strains, including Y and there is now a push to promote this broad spectrum vaccine.

“Cases like this reinforce the need.”

The strains of the bacteria were continuously evolving to survive.

“The fight against viruses, bacteria and fungi will be an eternal fight as they evolve to find hosts,” Dr Stevenson said.

“That includes human hosts. The (bacteria) can mean death or disability to those affected.”.

But the latest vaccination rates showed an increasing number of people on the Sunshine Coast weren’t taking up their free vaccinations.

“Figures that have come in show Noosa now has the lowest vaccination rate in Queensland at only 85%,” Dr Stevenson said.

“Unfortunately through false science or through apathy or, frankly, neglect parents are not properly vaccinating their children.

“One in six children in the Noosa region now has been inadequately vaccinated.”

The child that presented at his practice with meningisms was one of them.

“This will haunt those children as they become adults,” he said.

“Many will want to travel overseas and will be largely unprotected against more exotic bugs in faraway places.

“Many do suffer as a result and it is largely avoidable.

Henry Sapiecha

YOUR LIVER DISEASE COULD BE TOXIC TONKA BEAN, WARFARIN OR CINNAMON POISONING

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

DRIED TONKA BEANS ON KITCHEN CUTTING BOARD

Coumarin is mostly toxic to the liver, which plays a central role in mopping up poisons and clearing them from the body. As the front-line defence, the organ is extraordinarily resilient, able to regenerate from just a quarter of its original size. Just like alcohol, coumarin is thought to be toxic over the long term, with repeated bouts of damage.

“The problem is it’s not like you’re going to realise when you’ve got to the level where you’re eating too much – the effects build up over years,” says Dirk Lachenmeier from the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Laboratory (CVUA) of Karlsruhe, Germany, who has developed a new way of detecting coumarin in foods.

The easy way to find out is obvious; alas, it turns out feeding people toxic chemicals isn’t allowed. Instead, the safe limits in humans are based on studies in animals, from baboons to dogs. To account for an any differences in our biology, the highest amount which hasn’t caused any harm in animals is multiplied by 100.

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative

For an average-sized person, this works out at a measly one quarter of a tonka bean or a quarter of a cinnamon bun per day – though if you remove the safety factor, your allowance shoots up to more like 25 tonka beans or 20 cinnamon buns (5680 calories, a challenge for even the most hardened binge eaters).

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative. Many animals, including rats and dogs, remove coumarin from the body in a completely different way, breaking it down into highly potent chemicals which are toxic in their own right. Instead, we have enzymes which subtly tweak coumarin’s structure to render it safe. But not all people can do this.

Back in the 90s, a woman arrived at Frankfurt University Hospital with severe liver disease. She was promptly diagnosed with “coumarin-induced hepatitis”, but in fact she hadn’t overdosed on tonka beans. She had been taking the drug warfarin.

What was going on?

MORE HERE

Henry Sapiecha

Rare flesh-eating cancer shock surprise after visit to dentist

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Ceri Jones thought she had an abscess — No- She had a rare flesh-eating cancer

Bravery of Ceri Jones

The Ceri Jones flesh eating disease story

CERI Jones thought it would just be a routine trip to the dentist. www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

The 21-year-old had a lump in her mouth she thought was an abscess, so went to the dentist for a check up. It was only then the pub chef from Wales was horrified to lean her problem was in fact a serious, very rare, form of flesh-eating cancer.

The dentist did X-rays and told her there was nothing there so sent her to hospital for more tests. She then got the devastating diagnosis.

“It was November last year when I was diagnosed with Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma and was referred to Liverpool Women’s Hospital.

“I’d never heard of anything like it, I was so shocked that I actually had it to be honest,” The Mirror reported.

Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma affects the salivary glands of the head and neck. She needed 36 hours on the operating table to remove the tumour. But she also lost her left eye.

But that wasn’t all.

The cancer was at an advanced stage after it had spread so her upper left jaw and upper left facial bones were also replaced with titanium metal and her face needed to be reconstructed.

She also lost her teeth on the left side as she had to have the muscle and skin on her right thigh grafted into her mouth.

Miss Jones told the Daily Post the horrifying detail of the operation.

“I was under sedation for two weeks while they did it and took skin and muscle from my right thigh to replace the left and side palate in my mouth, and they had to connect major arteries to blood vessels in my neck so the palate would keep alive.”

The British health system has paid for her to fly to Florida, in the United States, to undergo specialist radiotherapy for the next few months.

But she has to meet her own costs to cover day-to-day living and other expenses, so her family have launched a GoFundMe page has been set up to help with hopes to raise almost $10,000.

Her mum Sarah Evans said: “I relive this nightmare every day from the day we took Ceri to Liverpool to the day she came home and the morning she went down to theatre for the longest life-changing surgery and the complications she had thereafter.”

She said she was proud of the “bravery and strength” her daughter had shown.

“She’s an inspiration.”

Henry Sapiecha

Video below on Flesh Eating Cancer

The Tree of Life plant Moringa Oleifera Kills 97% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells in Vitro

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

We just discovered an amazing report about Moringa, courtesy of our friends over at The Eden Prescription. In 2013 scientists reported in a paper published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A peer-reviewed, open access journal) that A hot-water extract of the leaves of Moringa Oleifera killed up to 97% of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1) after 72 hours in lab tests. Moringa leaf extract inhibited the growth of all pancreatic cell lines tested. [1]

Pancreatic cancer is very serious, one of the worst. Fewer than 6% patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas live five years after diagnosis. The typical treatment is currently chemotherapy.

Called the “miracle tree” on account of its many virtues, Moringa is very well known in India, parts of Africa, the Philippines and several other countries, yet it is relatively unknown in countries such as the USA. However it seems from the current buzz around it that it may well soon experience a rise to new popularity. It has a long history of use in traditional medicine due to its properties as an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, antidepressant, anti-diabetes, pain and fever reducer and even asthma treatment. We’ve dedicated a full page on our site to a detailed herbal report on the amazing Moringa and those interested in herbalism would do well to investigate this plant.

It also contains numerous powerful anti-cancer compounds such as kaempferol, rhamnetin and isoquercetin. Now, researchers are discovering that Moringa has anti-cancer potential with positive results so far against ovarian cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma in lab tests. A list of these studies can be seen on Pubmed here.

Please note that it’s a long way before Moringa can be claimed as a cancer cure, but this kind of study is important because it indicates the potential for a starting point for a medicine of the future. It’s especially interesting because Moringa is already in common use – not only in herbalism but in a wide variety of other applications.

Moringa is now extensively cultivated throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, but the largest Moringa crop in the world is produced by India – where it grows natively. It’s fascinating to note that may be one reason why the death rate from pancreatic cancer in India is a stunning 84% lower than in the United States!

**Moringa plants,material & seeds are available HERE.

Note – This article is not medical advice nor a substitute for consultation with a medical professional.

Note 2 – “In Vitro” literally means “In Glassware” and is the Latin expression to denote that the tests were done on cell cultures in a lab, as opposed to “In Vivo” which means tested on living creatures. Such studies indicate preliminary success but much more research will be needed to “prove” efficacy in humans. Though the huge disparity in pancreatic cancer rates in India is highly encouraging.

Check out our full “herbal page” on Moringa – tons of detailed information for those wishing to study this plant in depth: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Please check out The Eden Prescription for more reports on the cutting edge science being done investigating the medicinal properties of herbs!

References:

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957955

Moringa oleifera and the hot water infusions derived from its flowers, roots, leaves, seeds, and bark were also determined to possess antispasmodic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the seed infusion appears to suppress the contraction induced by acetylcholine in this study (ED50 of 65.6 mg/mL) and the edema stimulated by carrageenan at 1000 mg/kg. Diuretic activity was noted at a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. Some of these cited biological properties were also noted in the roots. [24]

Moringa – Active Compounds

One thing that Moringa truly and clearly has under its belt is its being a rich and good source – not to mention affordable and readily accessible – of vital minerals and vitamins, protein, β-carotene, amino acids, and various phenolics. Zeatin, quercetin, β-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid, and kaempferol can also be isolated from Moringa. [25] Upon a comprehensive analysis of Moringa glucosinolates and phenolics (including flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and cinnamates), Bennett et al. (2003) found that:

The seeds contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate at high concentrations.

The roots have high concentrations of 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and benzyl glucosinolate.

The leaves contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and three monoacetyl isomers of this glucosinolate; quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-(6′ ‘-malonyl-glucoside); kaempferol-3-O-glucoside and kaempferol-3-O-(6’ ‘-malonyl-glucoside) in lower amounts; and 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid.

The bark contains 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate. [24]

Names of Moringa, past and present

English: Moringa, Horseradish Tree, Tree Of Life, Moringa Tree of Paradise, Moringa the Never Die Tree, Drumstick Tree, Ben Oil Tree, Ben Tree
Latin (scientific nomenclature): Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Hyperanthera moringa (archaic)
Tamil: Murungai / Murungai Maram
Mandarin: la mu
Cantonese: lat mok (lit. ‘spicy wood’)
Filipino: malunggay / kamungay
Hindi / Indian: munaga / shajna
Spanish: palo de aceite / libertad
French: ben olifiere
Ayurvedic: Shigru / Shobhanjana
Hindi: Sahjan
Punjabi: Surajan
Konkani: Mhasanga Saang
Telugu: Munagachettu

Morniga – General Information

Moringa is a genus of 13 species of tropical and subtropical plants. The most widely known of these, and the subject of this article, is Moringa oleifera – a tree native to northwestern India. Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to as just “Moringa”, grows fast in a variety of climates and is cultivated in many regions because it can grow in poor or even some barren soils. Much of the plant is edible. The leaves are nutritious and are used as food for people and feed for livestock. [1]

The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. [2]

The moringa tree, when left to its own devices, usually grows as much as ten metres, although when cultivated for its leaves, seed pods (aka ‘drumsticks’), seeds, or flowers it is usually trimmed and maintained at an easily reachable length of one to three metres tall to allow for easier harvesting of its constituent parts.

Proponents of Moringa oleifera sing its praises. It has been described as “one of the most useful plants that exists” – owing to its unusual combination of high nutritional value, medicinal properties, fast growing and ability to thrive in arid environments. The leaves are rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron.

One of the reasons the Moringa tree can thrive in arid regions is that it has a long taproot – which also makes it valuable against soil erosion. [3] The main products made from the plant are edible seed oil, tea leaves and animal feed. The seed kernels are also used by the French perfume manufacturing industry. [4] The Moringa tree is now widely cultivated in Africa, Sri Lanka, India, Central and South America, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other food may be scarce. [5]

Moringa oleifera is listed in the AHPA’s “Herbs of Commerce”, p98. [6]

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References & Further Reading

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[3] http://www.miracletrees.org

[4] http://web.archive.org/web/20090906184503/http://www.shaebia.org/artman/publish/article_5934.shtml

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[6] “Herbs of Commerce” (AHPA) (2000 edition) – Michael McGuffin, John T. Kartesz, Albert Y Leung, Arthur O. Tucker p.98

[7] http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Moringa.html

[8] http://books.google.com/books?id=ZUw-AAAAcAAJ

[9] http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa

[10] http://web.archive.org/web/20120821200349/http://moringafact.com/health-benefit-of-moringa-leaves-and-moringa-seeds/

[11] http://edlagman.com/moringa/moringa-health-benefits.htm

[12] http://leafpower.wordpress.com/moringa-benefits/

[13] http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/201276/moringa-malunggay-philippines#.ULEkU-Tqk8o

[14] http://www.sooperarticles.com/food-drinks-articles/health-benefits-recipe-ben-oil-tree-malunggay-798017.html

[15] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-oil.php

[16] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-benefits.php

[17] http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95883:the-nutritional-and-healing-benefits-of-moringa&catid=105: saturday-magazine&Itemid=566

[18] http://books.google.com/books?id=tR6gAAAAMAAJ (p.123)

[19] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19666102

[20] Anwar F., Latif S., Ashraf M., & Gilani A. H. (2007). Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytotherapy Research, 21(1): 17–25. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17089328/

[21] Mbikay M. (2012). Therapeutic potential of Moringa oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia: A review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3:24. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00024. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290775/

[22] Ndong M., Uehara M., Katsumata S., & Suzuki K. (2007). Effects of oral administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar rats. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 40(3): 229–233. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.40.229. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398501/

[23] Jaiswal D., Kumar Rai P., Kumar A., Mehta S., & Watal G. (2009).Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3): 392–396. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.036. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501271/

[24] Cáceres A., Saravia A., Rizzo S., Zabala L., De Leon E., & Nave F. (1992).Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2: Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diuretic activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 36(3): 233–237. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1434682/

[25] Bennett R. N. et al. (2003).Profiling glucosinolates and phenolics in vegetative and reproductive tissues of the multi-purpose trees Moringa oleifera L. (horseradish tree) and Moringa stenopetala L. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(12): 3546–3553. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12769522/

*** MORINGA PLANTS-SEEDS & MATERIAL AVAILABLE HERE

CONTENT FOR THIS ARTICLE WAS OBTAINED FROM THE GREAT SITE BELOW

http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Henry Sapiecha

Do Not Throw Away The Healthiest Part Of Your Avocado

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

It’s well known that the avocado is great source of healthy fats as well as other super nutrients. But what you may now know is that you’ve been throwing away the healthiest part of your avocado…. the stone.

The Avocado’s Inside Secret

Did you know that the seed holds 70% of the avocado’s antioxidants! And yet, for years, we’ve been tossing it into the trash without a second thought. Also, just as green tea has been praised for its cancer fighting polyphenols, this hard, round avocado super-ball has been given the same distinguished praise. [1]

There’s more: it turns out that avocado seeds also have just as much beneficial soluble fiber as other top rated fiber foods. Along with the soluble fiber, the antioxidants work in the digestive tract to promote optimal digestive health as well as suppress tumor growth. The healthy oils found in the heart of this fruit are a great resource for our skin. Its natural fat helps to keep skin and hair look young, smooth, and supple. In South America, people use the seed as a herbal remedy to treat gastrointestinal tract problems. It has also been used for inflammation and diarrhea. [2]

But How To Eat The Seed…?

It’s understandable why people discard the stone: It’s super hard. My dental plan would probably not cover the cost to repair my teeth after gnawing on a bowling ball-like seed, no matter what the health benefits would be! So let me offer you the technique to access the health benefits of the avocado seed: Make it into powder.

Start by drying out the seed on a sunny window sill – or you can use a food dehydrator. After the avocado stone is thoroughly dry, chop(carefully!) the seed into four pieces. Then place the pieces in your food processor or blender and grind into a powder.

You can sprinkle the avocado seed powder directly on your food, your soups, salads, pastas, and anything else you would like. If you find the taste too bitter, I suggest adding it to a smoothie along with other fruits and veggies to mask its taste. One seed will give you enough powder for two smoothies. Another way to take in the goodness of the avocado seed is to make a tea. Simply place half of a seed in boiling water for 10 minutes or add one tablespoon of ground up seed powder to a cup of boiling water. [3]

Now that you know how powerful the avocado seed is, start collecting them and drying them out!

References:

[1] http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/most-people-are-throwing-healthiest-part-of-avocado-away-a6677211.html
[2] http://dailysuperfoodlove.com/4448/the-surprising-benefits-of-avocado-seeds/
[3] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3257112/Avocado-SEED-makes-70-nutritional-benefits-know-eat-it.html

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Latest Research Report highlights that Cancers are caused by sugar

Sunday, June 11th, 2017

It’s something that has been murmured about – especially in alternative health circles – for several years: The connection between sugar and cancer.

The roots of this idea come from the work of Dr. Otto Warburg, who won the Nobel Prize in 1931 for his work demonstrating that cancer cells in the human body derive nourishment through the fermentation of glucose. He wrote “Oxygen gas, the donor of energy in plants and animals, is dethroned in the cancer cells and replaced by an energy-yielding reaction of the lowest living forms; namely a fermentation of glucose.

The full science behind this branch of medicine is very complex but for those interested, wikipedia has a (difficult / technical) introduction here – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warburg_hypothesis

New scientific research however has identified sugar not only as the fuel source for an already existing cancer, but as a primary driver in oncogenesis – i.e. the initiation of cancerous characteristics within previously healthy cells. So could it be that too much sugar in the system actually causes our cells to “go over to the dark side”?

Read the full report at the link below: (brilliant tutorial on the health effects of sugar)

Research Reveals How Sugar CAUSES Cancer

Henry Sapiecha

 

Maybe a 70-Year-Old can have the Arteries of a 20-Year-Old?

Saturday, June 3rd, 2017

TUESDAY, May 30, 2017 — Imagine having the clear, supple, healthy blood vessels of a 20-year-old in your 70s. It’s possible, but “challenging,” a new study suggests.

Still, if you eat right, exercise and stay trim, you have a shot at offsetting age-related blood vessel degeneration, according to this study of more than 3,000 adults.

Genetics played less of a role than lifestyle in keeping blood vessels young, the researchers found.

Over time, blood vessels stiffen and blood pressure rises, leading to a significant risk for heart disease and stroke, said Dr. Teemu Niiranen. He is a research fellow at Boston University School of Medicine and the Framingham Heart Study.

“We didn’t find any magic bullet that kept people’s blood vessels young,” he said. “It seems that these are people who just lead a very healthy lifestyle.”

Heart disease is really a lifestyle disease, Niiranen explained. And a lifetime of poor eating habits and sedentary living — hallmarks of Western culture — take their toll, he said.

“When you get over 70, it is hard to maintain a normal vasculature — it’s possible, but it’s very challenging,” Niiranen said.

But in many indigenous hunter-gatherer populations, high blood pressure is the exception, not the rule, he said. Those groups rely on foraging and hunting to obtain food.

For the study, Niiranen and his colleagues collected data on nearly 3,200 adults aged 50 and older enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study — a long-running project run by the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Staying lean and not developing diabetes were the keys to keeping blood vessels young, he said.

Low cholesterol levels also contributed to maintaining healthy blood vessels, Niiranen said.

The study looked for an association between healthy vascular aging and adherence to the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7” healthy heart goals. People who met six out of seven goals were 10 times more likely to have healthy blood vessels as they aged than those who met none of the goals, the researchers found.

The goals of the heart association’s Life’s Simple 7 include:

  • Keep blood pressure normal,
  • Keep cholesterol low,
  • Keep blood sugar down,
  • Stay active,
  • Eat healthy,
  • Lose weight,
  • Stop smoking.

People who had healthy blood vessels had a 55 percent lower risk of developing heart disease or stroke, Niiranen said.

Dr. Byron Lee is a professor of medicine and director of electrophysiology laboratories and clinics at the University of California, San Francisco.

“We may not have found the fountain of youth, but we now know what can keep your arteries young,” said Lee.

Simple things like eating right, staying active, and managing your blood pressure and cholesterol seem to slow and sometimes even stop the stiffening of arteries once considered inevitable, he said.

“Hopefully, this will spur more people to choose a healthy lifestyle,” Lee noted.

Among the study participants, the researchers looked for those with normal blood pressure and supple blood vessels, measured by so-called pulse-wave velocity. These individuals were defined as having healthy blood vessels.

Overall, just under 18 percent of the participants had healthy blood vessels. Younger participants were most likely to have healthy vessels, the study findings showed.

However, while about 30 percent of those aged 50 to 59 had healthy blood vessels, only 1 percent of those 70 and older did, Niiranen said. And these were most likely to be women.

“It is possible for everyone to maintain a vasculature of a 20-year-old into old age, but it takes a lot of hard work,” he said.

The report was published online May 30 in the journal Hypertension.

More information

For more on Life’s Simple 7, visit the American Heart Association.

Henry Sapiecha