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Archive for the ‘BACTERIA’ Category

‘Lick of death’: Why Greg lost his legs and hands

Thursday, November 28th, 2019

Wisconsin Greg Manteufel’s symptoms began with fever and vomiting, as if he had the flu. By the following morning, he was delirious, and his temperature had soared.

His wife rushed him to the hospital, a quick drive from their Wisconsin home. Once they arrived, Dawn Manteufel said she noticed bruises – several of them, all over his body – that weren’t there when they left their house just five minutes earlier. To Dawn, it was as if her husband had just been beaten with a baseball bat.

Within a week at the hospital, the 48-year-old who paints houses for a living and loves to ride his Harley-Davidson motorcycle lost his legs. And then his hands.

Greg Manteufel suffered a rare blood infection after harmful bacteria from a dog’s saliva seeped into his bloodstream, causing sepsis, or blood poisoning.

Greg Manteufel in hospital.

The sepsis resulted in blood spots that looked like bruises all over his body, particularly on his chest and face. Doctors pumped him with antibiotics to stop the infection, his wife said, but clots blocked the flow of blood to his extremities, causing tissue and muscles to die.

The bacteria, called Capnocytophaga canimorsus, “just attacked him”, Dawn said, and it did so quickly and aggressively. To save his life, doctors had to cut his legs from the knee down, and then his hands.

“Why him? Why did this happen to us?” Dawn asked.

Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a bacteria commonly found in dogs and cats. It’s present in the saliva of most healthy dogs and is usually not harmful to humans, but in rare cases, the bacteria can poison the blood and cause death.

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A healthy man was licked by his dog. He was dead within weeks

Thursday, November 28th, 2019

The 63-year-old man showed up in the hospital with a burning sensation in his left leg and muscle pain in both legs. His flu-like symptoms were severe, with laboured breathing for three days. He had petechiae, or rounds spots on the skin that look like rashes as a result of bleeding capillaries, which made his legs look discoloured.

The patient’s heartbeat was stable, doctors said, even though he was running a temperature of 38.8 degrees. His laboured breathing caused an inadequate supply of oxygen to his tissue. His failing kidneys were not producing urine, researchers wrote.

The man was infected with a type of bacteria found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats.

The man was infected with a type of bacteria found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats.Credit:iStock

But doctors had no idea what was wrong with him. He had not recently been in the hospital. They suspected some kind of bacteria, but he didn’t have any open wounds and he didn’t have meningitis.

It wasn’t until his fourth day in the hospital that a blood test revealed that the man had a type of bacteria found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats. It’s a kind of bacteria that’s usually only transmitted to humans if they are bitten.

But the German man is dead because his dog licked him.

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Baby loses all his hands & feet after throat infection turns to sepsis

Wednesday, August 14th, 2019

WARNING! GRAPHIC

A mum has shared the horrifying details of her baby losing all four of his limbs after a throat infection turned into deadly sepsis.

Oliver Aisthorpe has made a miraculous recovery after doctors warned mum Abigail Wardle, 23, that her 11-month-old son wasn’t going to pull through.

And even after he beat the infection, Abigail, from Cleethorpes, in the UK, had to endure the horror of Oliver’s leg self-amputating and coming away in her hand as she held him in his hospital bed.

It was a shocking ordeal considering just 48 hours earlier he’d been a happy, giggling little boy.

Oliver Aisthorpe has made a miraculous recovery after a deadly illness robbed him of all four limbs. Picture: Caters News

Oliver Aisthorpe has made a miraculous recovery after a deadly illness robbed him of all four limbs. Picture: Caters News

“Oliver had seemed a bit under the weather. But that night, he got more ill and seemed lifeless,” Abigail said. “When I moved him, it was as though his bones were aching.”

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A Woman Needed Her Hands and Legs Amputated After Contracting Infection from Dog ‘Kisses’

Wednesday, August 7th, 2019

A little lick from a puppy may have led to a life-threatening infection for one woman in Ohio, who ended up needing her hands and legs amputated to save her life, according to news reports.

The woman, Marie Trainer, went to the emergency room on May 11 after developing a fever, nausea and backache, according to CNN. Trainer had recently returned from vacation in the Caribbean, and doctors at first thought she had a travel-related illness.

But the exact cause of her illness remained a mystery, and Trainer’s health worsened. She lost consciousness and was put into a medically induced coma, according to her GoFundMe page. Her skin also started to turn a purplish-red color and the tissue started to die, CNN reported. [11 Ways Your Beloved Pet May Make You Sick]

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Scientists Find a Possible Connection Between Gut Bacteria and Depression

Friday, February 22nd, 2019
A new report identifies bacteria in the microbiome that could produce neurotransmitters and potentially influence activity in the brain cells

The human microbiome—a collection of bacteria, archaea, fungi and viruses commingling in the gut and intestines—has been linked to a wide range of human health conditions, including digestive health and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Some research has even identified a possible link between gut health and brain function. Building on this work, a study published yesterday in Nature Microbiology reveals that clinical depression could be affected by the amounts of certain bacteria in the gut.

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Finger cut leaves Australian dad fighting for life with flesh-eating bacteria

Sunday, November 19th, 2017

An Australian father remains in hospital with a potentially deadly flesh-eating bacteria after cutting his finger at work.

What started as a small cut has left a Victorian dad fighting for life with a flesh-eating bacteria, his family says.

Two weeks ago, Jeff Beck thought he had the flu. A day later, he was undergoing emergency surgery and doctors discovered he had necrotising fasciitis.

Health experts believe the potentially deadly flesh-eating bacteria is caused by microscopic bugs commonly found on the body.

It gets under the skin through open wounds or small cuts before destroying fat and muscle.

“This was caused simply from a small cut on his finger which he did at work – something that happens almost daily when you are doing physical labour,” Mr Beck’s daughter Stephanie wrote on a GoFundMe page.

“Jeff has so far had a quarter of his torso removed to cut out the dead tissue.

“They are now giving him hyperbaric chamber treatments twice a day to help stop the infection spreading and to also treat his large open wound.”

Mr Beck was placed in an induced coma and underwent multiple surgeries but was improving by the day at Melbourne’s The Alfred Hospital , Stephanie said.

“I went and sat with Dad last night and he could respond to my questions by blinking,” she wrote on Facebook on Wednesday.

“He would obviously be very scared and confused waking up as he will have no idea what has happened to him – the last time he was awake he thought he just had the flu.

“Nurses say he is absolutely smashing it.”

Mr Beck’s family, from Moe, are hoping to raise money for treatment and accommodation costs.

Henry Sapiecha

Antibiotics which kill useful bugs are giving cancer patients a kick in the guts

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

Antibiotics may be impeding our ability to fight cancer, two new studies on gut bacteria suggest.

Bacteria-killing pills such as penicillin already get a bad rap for leading to the rise of the drug-resistant superbugs that create havoc in our hospitals.

Now, two studies suggest they also strip our gut of the healthy bacteria needed to help combat cancer.

The new research might soon lead to doctors prescribing probiotics – or even faecal transplants – before starting a dose of chemotherapy.

What remains unclear is which bacteria out of the millions living inside us are responsible for helping to fight cancer. Each study identified a different bug as being the most important.

Microbiota are the tiny bacterial organisms that live in our gut. The community of these bacteria is called the microbiome.

“This research may be applied by developing strategies to change the microbiome to enhance responses to cancer treatment,” says the University of Texas’ Dr Jennifer Wargo, a co-author of one of the papers.

“But we aren’t yet sure what the right formulations are, so we really need to use caution, as some approaches may not help and could potentially even adversely affect the microbiome.”

The two new studies, published on Friday in the journal Science, looked at the impact of microbiota on immunotherapy, a form of chemotherapy that uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.

Immunotherapy is “one of the great hopes for cancer therapy”, says Professor Matthew Brown, director of genomics at the Queensland University of Technology.

Professor Brown is an expert on both the microbiome and immunotherapy, and was not involved in the study.

A large number of patients don’t respond to immunotherapy and researchers have been struggling to discover why.

For the first study, French researchers looked at 249 cancer patients receiving immunotherapy. Of those, 69 had been prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics at the same time to treat other infections.

Cancer survival rates were significantly lower for patients who had been treated with antibiotics, the researchers found. Analysis of their gut microbiota showed they had a much lower diversity of gut bacteria, presumably caused by the antibiotics.

To cross-check the results, the researchers gave cancerous mice an antibiotic followed by a dose of immunotherapy. They too had failed to respond to the treatment.

The researchers then gave them microbiota transplants from the patients who did best on immunotherapy. The mice immediately began to respond strongly to the treatment.

“That’s something that should translate rapidly into changes in protocols to minimise antibiotic use before or after immunotherapy. That was really quite a strong finding,” said Professor Brown.

In the second study, a team of researchers in America and France reported on 112 melanoma patients undergoing immunotherapy.

The patients who responded the best to treatment tended to have a much higher diversity of microbes in their gut.

The microbiome of the group that performed well seemed to be building a lot of amino acids – known to promote immunity – while the microbiome of the other patients focussed more on breaking down compounds.

In fact, the researchers found, the abundance of a single bug, Faecalibacterium, in a patient’s gut was one of the strongest predictors of whether immunotherapy was successful or not.

However, the other study singled out Akkermansia muciniphila as the bug linked to immunotherapy success.

Dr Wargo said gut bacteria was likely influencing the immune system in a number of ways, including producing chemicals that interacted with and stimulated immune cells.

“But we don’t know all the answers yet and there is still a great deal to learn,” she said.

Henry Sapiecha