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Turmeric could Be The World’s Most Important Herb.600 reasons why.PLEASE SHARE.

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This article was supplied by herbs-info.com

We found a simply astonishing page all about Turmeric and had to share! I honestly think it is one of the best pages about a herb I have ever seen (and I’ve seen a fair number!) The link is after our commentary.

There are several things that are amazing about the page we discovered. First – of course – the fact that there is scientific research to support the notion that turmeric may be beneficial for a staggering 600+ conditions. It is one of the world’s most studied items for medicinal potential, with over 4000 scientific studies being recorded overall.

Then there is the fact that the mighty turmeric has been in use for over 6000 years, with an incredible safety record. Note also, the effects of turmeric have been found by scientists to be greatly enhanced when it is taken in combination with black pepper (see our report here – Substance In Black Pepper Increases Bioavailability Of Beneficial Turmeric Compounds by 2000% )

Even more amazing is the way the article weaves a crystal-clear narrative that exposes the farce behind the fact that the modern medical world will perhaps never approve turmeric “officially” for medical use. It explains clearly that “proof” is effectively only purchased by those with very deep pockets (802 million dollars on average is the cost for obtaining a new drug approval). [1] The situation is a complete joke. Turmeric is clearly and obviously one of the most benign and beneficial things in the known universe.

But most amazing of all, to me, was the comment from the man who states calmly that he is one of the world’s longest survivors of the kidney transplant operation (34 years since the op, the world record is 40 years) and he takes capsules of turmeric (and other herbs) daily. Truly inspiring stuff.

The original article is fantastic, electrifying even – and we encourage you to share this article www.newcures.info  far and wide. Here’s the link: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/600-reasons-turmeric-may-be-worlds-most-important-herb

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Killer cancer we know very little about

Sunday, November 12th, 2017

Kristin Washbourne thought she was doing all the right things to cure what she thought was indigestion. Then she was given a two per cent chance of survival

AT 45, worn out from chasing after two small children and sometimes neglecting to take care of herself, Kristin Washbourne didn’t even think to question her GP when he told her the abdominal pain she had been experiencing was probably indigestion.

She accepted the diagnosis, went to the chemist for some antacids, and promised to take better care of herself.

It wasn’t until loading up on yet more packs of the indigestion tablets, that a very insistent young pharmacist warned her that if she’s been taking the treatment for more than 10 days she had to see her doctor about it.

She’d been popping the over-the-counter pills daily for almost a full year.

“Over that year I had been mentioning the pain to my doctor, but also blowing it off a bit and blaming myself,” she told news.com.au.

“I was a bit overweight, not exercising as much as I should, but I sort of kept downplaying it, but after that I asked him to send me off and get tests for ulcers and bacterins that caused ulcers.”

The tests didn’t eventuate, instead Kristin made another promise to take better care of herself.

But a little while later, after a week of extreme fatigue during the summer holidays – barely being able to move for the pain, and feeling like she could only feel OK if she didn’t eat – Kristin began taking the symptoms a bit more seriously and had her husband rush her to the emergency room.

A lick of fake tan had concealed her yellowing skin, and through her tiredness she didn’t notice her eyes had gone a creamy colour.

This picture was taken a couple of days after Kristin Washbourne was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and given a two per cent shot at survival. She hadn’t even realised her skin and eyes were turning yellow. Picture: Kristin Washbourne

This extreme jaundice, combined with the stomach pains, the fatigue, and some strange bowel movements, all pointed to one thing: pancreatic cancer.

“It was something that I had never even thought of, and looking back now, even when I got the diagnosis, it makes me realise how much I didn’t know,” she said.

Instead of freezing at the word cancer, Kristin said she felt strangely relieved. She thought: “They cure cancer these days, I guess I’ll be fine.”

But what Kristin didn’t know then, and what most Australians aren’t aware of, is that when it comes to pancreatic cancer, there’s no such thing as an easy fix.

It is one of the most aggressive cancers with one of the lowest survival rates.

Of the nine people diagnosed in Australia every day, only one is likely to survive.

When Kristin was diagnosed, just five years ago, she was give a two per cent chance at survival.

On average, when an Australian is diagnosed with the disease, they’ll only have six months to live.

It was the terrifyingly low instances of survival from pancreatic cancer that make Kristin not only lucky to be alive, but also made her journey so difficult.

Even though she was given such a dark prognosis, her treatment was successful and she never felt as sick as she thought she should.

After a gamut of tests and surgery that left her with a scar from her pubic bone to her sternum that made Kristin look “all zipped up”, she cried for 48 hours, didn’t sleep for days, and stayed in hospital for weeks.

Kristin’s daughter Marla has dyed her hair purple to raise awareness for pancreatic cancer. Picture: Kristin Washbourne

Eight rounds of chemo and radiation left her “knocked out” for months, but every step of the way she was just thinking, it could be a lot worse.

As she went through her recovery, Kristin’s understanding of the seriousness of the disease continued to develop, and she realised how lucky she was.

“The pain (from the surgery) was incredible, the recovery from that was just unbearable, but it eventually was over and I felt pretty much OK,” she said.

“In my recovery, I had a really bad feeling of survivor guilt. I lost 30kg, There were months when I was basically bedridden, completely knocked out by steroids, but every step of the way I knew most other people didn’t make it to that stage.”

When Kristin started to feel better, things began to get even more uncertain.

“The trouble is for me, once I started getting better, it gave me a boost when the oncologist was pretty happy that I was still around so I thought maybe I was here for good,” she said.

“So what I wanted to know was, what happens next? But I couldn’t find any survivors to talk to. No one could tell me what was going to happen, how my life would change, if I would carry on as normal.

“It was a really hard time. I was so desperate to talk to someone to find out what happens next, but the survival rates are even lower than the awareness rates when it comes to this disease.”

Five years on from her diagnosis and fighting fit, Kristin has accepted that she is a survivor, and feels the responsibility to use her experience to help people who have been diagnosed, and those who may be delaying diagnosis like she did for so long.

“The thing about this disease, is there is no reason for it. There’s not like a family history as with breast cancer so you know to get checked, there’s no really obvious or specific symptoms like with bowel cancer or prostate cancer,” she said.

“The only hope now is to know the symptoms, and know if someone’s telling you they’ve got indigestion, if it persists, then go and do something. That’s the only way we’re going to catch it.”

Even when she lost weight and was going through chemo, Kristin’s cancer experience was nothing like what she expected. Picture: Kristin Washbourne

St Vincent’s Hospital pancreatic cancer specialist Dr Lorraine Chantrill says the reason pancreatic cancer doesn’t get the same level of awareness as some others with lower death rates, is the same reason Kristin found it difficult to find answers about her recovery.

“The main reason it doesn’t get that recognition is because people die from it,” she said.

“There are very few people who survive who can go on to campaign for it. The other cancers that have got a lot of visibility are cancers that people survive.”

Dr Chantrill says recognition and awareness around the disease are “getting better”, and it’s rising in line with survival rates.

Having the unenviable badge of one of the worst cancers is getting it noticed as well.

But while recognition is increasing, the symptoms are still vague and hard to pin down.

“It’s a cancer that generally presents in people who are older than 60, it often presents with some vague symptoms like upper abdominal pain, but in people who develop diabetes without being overweight, people who have change in their bowel habits of suddenly lose weight for no reason, we want those people to keep persisting with their doctor and to go and get tests,” she said.

“I think we can start to end the nihilism around pancreas cancer and start actually making a difference and it’s thanks to some really brave people who have participated in research.”

This coming Wednesday is world pancreatic cancer day. The Sydney Opera House will be lit up in purple lights and landmarks across the world will follow.

Kristin’s daughter, Marla, has died her hair purple ahead of the day, and Kristin will wear purple clothing.

Whenever anyone asks them why, they’ll start the conversation Kristin, Dr Chantrill and others affected by pancreatic want Australians to start having.

“If people start talking about it, and people start being aware of it, that’s going to lead to more awareness, more fundraising, more research, and more survivors,” Kristin says.

Leah in hospital after the cancer diagnosis. Picture: 60 Minutes

Mr Debono said the image of Leah in hospital after she had been diagnosed with a brain tumour “haunts me”.

“I never thought I would be thrown into any of this,” he said.

“I was holding onto her till the end.”

He and Leah’s parents are desperately trying to figure out how the medical system could fail the young Aussie, who was told she was cancer-free.

“We watched her take her last breath. You don’t ever want to have to go through something like that, it’s really cruel,” Leah’s father, Lex, told 60 Minutes.

“The GP looked at it, assured her that there was nothing … Some trained professionals may not have done their job properly.”

They are also sharing Leah’s story to spread awareness around melanoma and warn Australians about the risks of this deadly disease.

Henry Sapiecha

Antibiotics which kill useful bugs are giving cancer patients a kick in the guts

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

Antibiotics may be impeding our ability to fight cancer, two new studies on gut bacteria suggest.

Bacteria-killing pills such as penicillin already get a bad rap for leading to the rise of the drug-resistant superbugs that create havoc in our hospitals.

Now, two studies suggest they also strip our gut of the healthy bacteria needed to help combat cancer.

The new research might soon lead to doctors prescribing probiotics – or even faecal transplants – before starting a dose of chemotherapy.

What remains unclear is which bacteria out of the millions living inside us are responsible for helping to fight cancer. Each study identified a different bug as being the most important.

Microbiota are the tiny bacterial organisms that live in our gut. The community of these bacteria is called the microbiome.

“This research may be applied by developing strategies to change the microbiome to enhance responses to cancer treatment,” says the University of Texas’ Dr Jennifer Wargo, a co-author of one of the papers.

“But we aren’t yet sure what the right formulations are, so we really need to use caution, as some approaches may not help and could potentially even adversely affect the microbiome.”

The two new studies, published on Friday in the journal Science, looked at the impact of microbiota on immunotherapy, a form of chemotherapy that uses the body’s own immune system to fight cancer.

Immunotherapy is “one of the great hopes for cancer therapy”, says Professor Matthew Brown, director of genomics at the Queensland University of Technology.

Professor Brown is an expert on both the microbiome and immunotherapy, and was not involved in the study.

A large number of patients don’t respond to immunotherapy and researchers have been struggling to discover why.

For the first study, French researchers looked at 249 cancer patients receiving immunotherapy. Of those, 69 had been prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics at the same time to treat other infections.

Cancer survival rates were significantly lower for patients who had been treated with antibiotics, the researchers found. Analysis of their gut microbiota showed they had a much lower diversity of gut bacteria, presumably caused by the antibiotics.

To cross-check the results, the researchers gave cancerous mice an antibiotic followed by a dose of immunotherapy. They too had failed to respond to the treatment.

The researchers then gave them microbiota transplants from the patients who did best on immunotherapy. The mice immediately began to respond strongly to the treatment.

“That’s something that should translate rapidly into changes in protocols to minimise antibiotic use before or after immunotherapy. That was really quite a strong finding,” said Professor Brown.

In the second study, a team of researchers in America and France reported on 112 melanoma patients undergoing immunotherapy.

The patients who responded the best to treatment tended to have a much higher diversity of microbes in their gut.

The microbiome of the group that performed well seemed to be building a lot of amino acids – known to promote immunity – while the microbiome of the other patients focussed more on breaking down compounds.

In fact, the researchers found, the abundance of a single bug, Faecalibacterium, in a patient’s gut was one of the strongest predictors of whether immunotherapy was successful or not.

However, the other study singled out Akkermansia muciniphila as the bug linked to immunotherapy success.

Dr Wargo said gut bacteria was likely influencing the immune system in a number of ways, including producing chemicals that interacted with and stimulated immune cells.

“But we don’t know all the answers yet and there is still a great deal to learn,” she said.

Henry Sapiecha

The Tree of Life plant Moringa Oleifera Kills 97% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells in Vitro

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

We just discovered an amazing report about Moringa, courtesy of our friends over at The Eden Prescription. In 2013 scientists reported in a paper published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A peer-reviewed, open access journal) that A hot-water extract of the leaves of Moringa Oleifera killed up to 97% of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1) after 72 hours in lab tests. Moringa leaf extract inhibited the growth of all pancreatic cell lines tested. [1]

Pancreatic cancer is very serious, one of the worst. Fewer than 6% patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas live five years after diagnosis. The typical treatment is currently chemotherapy.

Called the “miracle tree” on account of its many virtues, Moringa is very well known in India, parts of Africa, the Philippines and several other countries, yet it is relatively unknown in countries such as the USA. However it seems from the current buzz around it that it may well soon experience a rise to new popularity. It has a long history of use in traditional medicine due to its properties as an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, antidepressant, anti-diabetes, pain and fever reducer and even asthma treatment. We’ve dedicated a full page on our site to a detailed herbal report on the amazing Moringa and those interested in herbalism would do well to investigate this plant.

It also contains numerous powerful anti-cancer compounds such as kaempferol, rhamnetin and isoquercetin. Now, researchers are discovering that Moringa has anti-cancer potential with positive results so far against ovarian cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma in lab tests. A list of these studies can be seen on Pubmed here.

Please note that it’s a long way before Moringa can be claimed as a cancer cure, but this kind of study is important because it indicates the potential for a starting point for a medicine of the future. It’s especially interesting because Moringa is already in common use – not only in herbalism but in a wide variety of other applications.

Moringa is now extensively cultivated throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, but the largest Moringa crop in the world is produced by India – where it grows natively. It’s fascinating to note that may be one reason why the death rate from pancreatic cancer in India is a stunning 84% lower than in the United States!

**Moringa plants,material & seeds are available HERE.

Note – This article is not medical advice nor a substitute for consultation with a medical professional.

Note 2 – “In Vitro” literally means “In Glassware” and is the Latin expression to denote that the tests were done on cell cultures in a lab, as opposed to “In Vivo” which means tested on living creatures. Such studies indicate preliminary success but much more research will be needed to “prove” efficacy in humans. Though the huge disparity in pancreatic cancer rates in India is highly encouraging.

Check out our full “herbal page” on Moringa – tons of detailed information for those wishing to study this plant in depth: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Please check out The Eden Prescription for more reports on the cutting edge science being done investigating the medicinal properties of herbs!

References:

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957955

Moringa oleifera and the hot water infusions derived from its flowers, roots, leaves, seeds, and bark were also determined to possess antispasmodic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the seed infusion appears to suppress the contraction induced by acetylcholine in this study (ED50 of 65.6 mg/mL) and the edema stimulated by carrageenan at 1000 mg/kg. Diuretic activity was noted at a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. Some of these cited biological properties were also noted in the roots. [24]

Moringa – Active Compounds

One thing that Moringa truly and clearly has under its belt is its being a rich and good source – not to mention affordable and readily accessible – of vital minerals and vitamins, protein, β-carotene, amino acids, and various phenolics. Zeatin, quercetin, β-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid, and kaempferol can also be isolated from Moringa. [25] Upon a comprehensive analysis of Moringa glucosinolates and phenolics (including flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and cinnamates), Bennett et al. (2003) found that:

The seeds contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate at high concentrations.

The roots have high concentrations of 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and benzyl glucosinolate.

The leaves contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and three monoacetyl isomers of this glucosinolate; quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-(6′ ‘-malonyl-glucoside); kaempferol-3-O-glucoside and kaempferol-3-O-(6’ ‘-malonyl-glucoside) in lower amounts; and 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid.

The bark contains 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate. [24]

Names of Moringa, past and present

English: Moringa, Horseradish Tree, Tree Of Life, Moringa Tree of Paradise, Moringa the Never Die Tree, Drumstick Tree, Ben Oil Tree, Ben Tree
Latin (scientific nomenclature): Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Hyperanthera moringa (archaic)
Tamil: Murungai / Murungai Maram
Mandarin: la mu
Cantonese: lat mok (lit. ‘spicy wood’)
Filipino: malunggay / kamungay
Hindi / Indian: munaga / shajna
Spanish: palo de aceite / libertad
French: ben olifiere
Ayurvedic: Shigru / Shobhanjana
Hindi: Sahjan
Punjabi: Surajan
Konkani: Mhasanga Saang
Telugu: Munagachettu

Morniga – General Information

Moringa is a genus of 13 species of tropical and subtropical plants. The most widely known of these, and the subject of this article, is Moringa oleifera – a tree native to northwestern India. Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to as just “Moringa”, grows fast in a variety of climates and is cultivated in many regions because it can grow in poor or even some barren soils. Much of the plant is edible. The leaves are nutritious and are used as food for people and feed for livestock. [1]

The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. [2]

The moringa tree, when left to its own devices, usually grows as much as ten metres, although when cultivated for its leaves, seed pods (aka ‘drumsticks’), seeds, or flowers it is usually trimmed and maintained at an easily reachable length of one to three metres tall to allow for easier harvesting of its constituent parts.

Proponents of Moringa oleifera sing its praises. It has been described as “one of the most useful plants that exists” – owing to its unusual combination of high nutritional value, medicinal properties, fast growing and ability to thrive in arid environments. The leaves are rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron.

One of the reasons the Moringa tree can thrive in arid regions is that it has a long taproot – which also makes it valuable against soil erosion. [3] The main products made from the plant are edible seed oil, tea leaves and animal feed. The seed kernels are also used by the French perfume manufacturing industry. [4] The Moringa tree is now widely cultivated in Africa, Sri Lanka, India, Central and South America, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other food may be scarce. [5]

Moringa oleifera is listed in the AHPA’s “Herbs of Commerce”, p98. [6]

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References & Further Reading

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[3] http://www.miracletrees.org

[4] http://web.archive.org/web/20090906184503/http://www.shaebia.org/artman/publish/article_5934.shtml

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[6] “Herbs of Commerce” (AHPA) (2000 edition) – Michael McGuffin, John T. Kartesz, Albert Y Leung, Arthur O. Tucker p.98

[7] http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Moringa.html

[8] http://books.google.com/books?id=ZUw-AAAAcAAJ

[9] http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa

[10] http://web.archive.org/web/20120821200349/http://moringafact.com/health-benefit-of-moringa-leaves-and-moringa-seeds/

[11] http://edlagman.com/moringa/moringa-health-benefits.htm

[12] http://leafpower.wordpress.com/moringa-benefits/

[13] http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/201276/moringa-malunggay-philippines#.ULEkU-Tqk8o

[14] http://www.sooperarticles.com/food-drinks-articles/health-benefits-recipe-ben-oil-tree-malunggay-798017.html

[15] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-oil.php

[16] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-benefits.php

[17] http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95883:the-nutritional-and-healing-benefits-of-moringa&catid=105: saturday-magazine&Itemid=566

[18] http://books.google.com/books?id=tR6gAAAAMAAJ (p.123)

[19] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19666102

[20] Anwar F., Latif S., Ashraf M., & Gilani A. H. (2007). Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytotherapy Research, 21(1): 17–25. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17089328/

[21] Mbikay M. (2012). Therapeutic potential of Moringa oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia: A review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3:24. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00024. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290775/

[22] Ndong M., Uehara M., Katsumata S., & Suzuki K. (2007). Effects of oral administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar rats. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 40(3): 229–233. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.40.229. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398501/

[23] Jaiswal D., Kumar Rai P., Kumar A., Mehta S., & Watal G. (2009).Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3): 392–396. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.036. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501271/

[24] Cáceres A., Saravia A., Rizzo S., Zabala L., De Leon E., & Nave F. (1992).Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2: Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diuretic activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 36(3): 233–237. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1434682/

[25] Bennett R. N. et al. (2003).Profiling glucosinolates and phenolics in vegetative and reproductive tissues of the multi-purpose trees Moringa oleifera L. (horseradish tree) and Moringa stenopetala L. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(12): 3546–3553. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12769522/

*** MORINGA PLANTS-SEEDS & MATERIAL AVAILABLE HERE

CONTENT FOR THIS ARTICLE WAS OBTAINED FROM THE GREAT SITE BELOW

http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Henry Sapiecha

Universal Cancer Vaccine Is Probably Impossible

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Cancer-Vaccine-image www.newcures (2)

The quest for vaccines to prevent cancers just hit a theoretical limit: If there ever are vaccines, there will have to be many, and not just one.

In theory, the best possible treatment for cancer would be one that required no radiation or surgery, instead using the body’s immune system to turn back a tumor’s uncontrollable growth. Recent developments in using immunotherapy to treat cancer has researchers thinking about a cancer vaccine as a potential breakthrough in prevention. But new research suggests that we shouldn’t hold out much hope for a single, universal vaccine for cancer.

While the first scientist to look at the immune system’s potential role in treating cancer conducted his research in the 1890s, it’s only in the past decade that immunotherapy has really taken off. Most famously, President Jimmy Carter was declared cancer-free in 2016 after immunotherapy was used to help treat a brain tumor. The basic principle is the same as any other disease the immune system deals with. The body’s defense mechanisms recognize the tumor as an invader and attack it, neutralizing the threat. The challenge lies in getting the immune system to see the tumor as a harmful, unwanted presence. It’s possible to do that by training the body’s immune system to recognize certain molecules in the tumor’s makeup.

A cancer vaccine would be the next big step for immunotherapy. While there are vaccines for cancers that are caused by an underlying infection — the HPV vaccine is probably the best-known example — vaccines meant to target non-infectious tumors are trickier. Some are in clinical trials to deal with specific types of cancer, but none are yet approved in the United States.

Based on researchers’ current knowledge, a cancer vaccine would require focusing on specific genetic alterations in tumors, which create molecules that the immune system can then target and attack if a tumor ever does pop up. The problem is that those alterations are different in every person, so each vaccine would have to be specifically designed and created for every individual patient. That would be expensive, likely prohibitively so.

The bad news, according to scientists at the cancer genetics research company Foundation Medicine and authors of the study, is that there doesn’t appear to be any way around that problem that would allow for the creation of a universal vaccine. They looked at the genomes of more than 60,000 different tumors to find any molecules that were the consistent result of these genetic alterations and that the immune systems could then go after. Even in the best-case scenario, the most common targets the researchers found would only be useful for about 0.3 percent of the population.

So a universal vaccine doesn’t appear to be possible, at least based on what we know right now. The researchers did point out that they only looked at the specifically cancer-causing parts of the tumor genomes, and it’s possible a currently unknown genetic alteration could be common enough to make a universal vaccine more feasible.

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Henry Sapiecha

Scientists develop system to stop cancer cells before they go further

Friday, April 1st, 2016

New biosensor mouse helps researchers stop cancer in its tracks before it spreads to other organs.

live_imaging_of_breast_cancer_image www.newcures.info

A large team of scientists from Australia and the UK have created a “biosensor mouse” in which they can track pancreatic cancer cells in real time with the help of fluorescence.

Using this new biosensor technique, the researchers even managed to prevent aggressive pancreatic cancer cells from spreading in a live mouse. In time, this biosensor tool could lead to better testing of new, promising cancer drugs.

“Our biosensor mouse makes it possible to look at a primary tumour that has not yet spread – in real time, in 3D and in a living tumour,“ said Dr Paul Timpson from Sydney’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research, who co-led the study with Prof Kurt Anderson of the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research (UK).

To create the biosensor mouse, researchers attached a green fluorescent protein from jellyfish to a molecule called E-cadherin – a protein involved in holding cells together. When this molecule stops working properly, cancer cells can become invasive.

“In pancreatic cancer, before it spreads, this molecule must “unzip”, the cells must stop touching each other so they’re not held together, and then they start invading the body,” said Timpson. Once these tumour cells settle in other organs, it becomes a metastasis – and most types of metastatic cancer currently can’t be treated.

Once the protein “zipper” molecule was made glow-in-the-dark, researchers could use a laser to determine how tightly the cells were holding together. They could watch in real time as the tumour cells started to lose the protein zipper holding them in place – catching the moment before cancer would set off on an invasive spread.

Stopping the cancer in its tracks

Pancreatic cancer doesn’t have a routine screening test, and is often diagnosed at late stages, when the tumour cells have already spread to other organs. According to Garvan Institute, each year roughly 2500 Australians are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer – and nearly 95 percent of them die within five years. If cancer is caught early and stopped before it spreads, the chance of survival becomes much higher.

To give cancer to the biosensor mouse, researchers introduced two genetic mutations responsible for creating most pancreatic cancers in humans – particularly one type that’s known to be invasive.

“What amazed us was that we could actually stop the spread of disease, keeping it local and stopping it in its tracks,” Timpson told SBS.

When they saw cancer cells starting to unzip, the researchers treated the mice with anti-invasive cancer drugs, dasatinib and saracatinib. “Within three days of treatment, we saw cells within the tumour had rezippered, and we could stabilise the primary tumour,” said Timpson.

“We’re now looking to see if we can use this beyond pancreatic cancer, and start in breast cancer, and colon cancers, for example.”

Promise of new cancer treatment

“We’ve actually already started discussions with large pharmaceutical companies both in Europe and Australia,” Timpson explained. For companies with various anti-cancer drugs in the development pipeline, this new biosensor mouse will become a valuable tool to better test whether a particular medication might be able to stop the disease from spreading.

Testing usually starts out in a petri dish, but this doesn’t always give a clear indication of whether the drug works, because cells can respond differently when they’re taken out of the body.

Professor Alpha Yap from the University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience has praised the research, calling it valuable.

“For the first time we are able to test how the E-cadherin adhesions between cancer cells respond to drugs when the cancers remain within the body,” said Yap, who wasn’t involved in the study. “This is an important contribution in the search to understand cancer and develop new treatments for it.”

Unfortunately, this approach can’t be used for cancer that’s already spread – but Timpson says the team is working on additional models. “We’re also creating other mice to look at different stages of cancer, so I would say it’s a major breakthrough in terms of tools for discovering new cancer drugs.”

The study was published today in Cell Reports.

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HenrySapiecha

 

Skin cells turned into brain tumor & cancer predators

Friday, February 26th, 2016

skin-cancer-tumor-killer-image www.newcures.info

Reprogrammed stem cells (green) chase down and kill glioblastoma cells (pink) (Credit: UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy)

The 2006 discovery that mature skin cells can be converted into stem cells opened up exciting possibilities in regenerative medicine. Now almost a decade later, the Nobel-Prize winning research of Shinya Yamanaka is still opening doors for scientists across different arms of medical research. In what it labels as a first, a team from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) has built on this technology to transform adult skin cells into cancer-killing stem cells that seek and destroy brain tumors.

Glioblastomas are the most common and fatal form of brain cancer, carrying a survival rate beyond two years of just 30 percent. While surgeons can remove the tumor, often its cancerous tentacles take root deep in the brain and allow it to grow back. Most patients die within a year and a half of diagnosis.

Radiation and chemotherapy can be used to tackle tumors that cannot be surgically removed, but the UNC research team is working towards yet another treatment that zeroes in on these tentacles as a means of further boosting survival rates.

The team harvested adult skin cells called fibroblasts, which produce collagen and connective tissue, and engineered these to become induced neural stems cells. They then administered these cells to mice, observing that they had the ability to go hunting through the brain for remaining cancer cells and kill them off.

This led to an increase in survival times ranging from 160 to 220 percent, depending on the type of tumor. The team says it is also possible to engineer the stem cells to produce a tumor-killing protein, which would make them an even more potent weapon against cancer.

The team mixed stem cells into an FDA-approved surgical glue, which provided a physical matrix to support them while they sought out the cancerous tentacles. The team is now exploring ways to further improve this staying power, along with the potential to load anti-cancer drugs into the stem cells.

“Our work represents the newest evolution of the stem-cell technology that won the Nobel Prize in 2012,” says Shawn Hingtgen, an assistant professor at UNC. “We wanted to find out if these induced neural stem cells would home in on cancer cells and whether they could be used to deliver a therapeutic agent. This is the first time this direct reprogramming technology has been used to treat cancer.”

The research was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Source: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Henry Sapiecha