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Archive for the ‘DISEASES’ Category

ENZYMES FROM PINEAPPLE THAT DESTROY CANCER CELLS

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

So what is this secret weapon?

Enzymes.

Dr. Wright explains that cancers are smart.

It’s because they’re experts at hiding for long periods of time. Most don’t need oxygen to live. And even when we “kill” cancer with conventional treatments, if just one cell survives…

It’s likely to start the disease process all over again.

As Dr. Wright explains, cancers are “built to survive.”

You see, cancers are able to hide because they have a secret “cloaking device.” It’s called fibrin.

It’s the same stuff scar tissue is made from. And cancer cells are covered in it.

Think of fibrin like a shield of armour.

This armor protects the cancer cells from anything that tries to destroy it.

It doesn’t matter if it’s your body’s natural defenses (like natural killer cells or white blood cells) or chemo drugs…

That fibrin is like a fortress, keeping cancer-killing soldiers out.

Fibrin is a sticky protein that forms a web of scar tissue around injuries. And that’s a good thing if you have an injury.

But here’s the problem: Inflammation causes your body to OVERPRODUCE fibrin in a big way

Check out the research published in the journal Medical Hypotheses:

“The tumor dons a ‘coat’ of the host’s own protein on its cell surface. The coat is composed of fibrin and of a polymeric form of human serum albumin (HSA)… Such a coated tumor appears as ‘self’ to the immune system, and thus is not detected as a tumor by the immune system…

When tumors are prepared for in vitro assays against drugs, they are routinely treated with proteolytic enzymes… which dissolve the protein coat, exposing the tumor cell surface to the drug.”

The reason why some cancer drugs may appear to work in laboratory testing and then fail to work in real people may be due to the cancer shield — it’s broken down with proteolytic enzymes during the lab tests but not in the real world, unless, possibly, the patients happen to be taking proteolytic enzymes.

Enzymes have been used in studies of cancer treatment before.

***In 2007, an animal study published in the journal Planta Medica found that

In 2007, an animal study published in the journal Planta Medica found that bromelain, an enzyme found in pineapple cores, treated cancer better than a chemotherapy drug — without toxic side effects.

Your Best “Weapon” to Fight Inflammation

The “proteolytic enzymes”  are your body’s MOST POTENT WEAPON against chronic inflammation.

And the chronic inflammation that proteolytic enzymes fight are also behind many of today’s most dangerous diseases, including:

> Various forms of cancer

> Heart disease

> Arthritis

> Alzheimer’s

> Chronic fatigue  

> Allergies  

> Fibromyalgia  

> COPD  

> Multiple skin diseases

And many more!

The proteolytic enzymes have even been shown to help heal varicose veins… keloids… other scar tissue… age spots… and much more!

Now this isn’t because it’s some “magical cure-all.”

It’s because proteolytic enzymes are produced naturally in your body and are designed to do the “pain-stopping, disease-fighting heavy-lifting”…

But the older you get, the more DEFICIENT in these proteolytic powerhouses you become.

Henry Sapiecha

Why Liver Cancer Numbers Continue to Increase

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

The five-year survival rate for people with liver cancer remains at only 20 percent. Diabetes, hepatitis C, smoking, and alcohol are all factors.

Between 2009 and 2013, doctors diagnosed liver cancer in 7.7 people out of every 100,000.

That number has been increasing since the mid-1970s.

In addition, the death rate is rising faster than for any other cancer — it is one of America’s leading causes of cancer death.

Between 2010 and 2014, it stood at 6.3 people per 100,000.

The five-year survival rate is only about 20 percent.

Healthline spoke with Dr. Jack Jacoub, medical oncologist and director of thoracic oncology at MemorialCare Cancer Institute at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in California.

He stated that liver cancer is “the second most common cancer killer in the world.”

This month, researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) published a groundbreaking study in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

During the study, researchers uncovered trends in liver cancer incidence, survival, and mortality rates.

Researchers used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program data obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Read more: Get the facts on liver cancer »

Risk factors

The following risk factors contribute to liver cancer:

Dr. Anton Bilchik, professor of surgery and chief of gastrointestinal research at John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in California, also spoke with Healthline.

Bilchik said “the reason for the increase in primary liver cancer is largely related to the obesity epidemic that we have going on in this country.”

“Whereas hepatitis C used to be the most common cause of liver cancer, the most common cause now is related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease,” he noted.

Jacoub, meanwhile, believes that hepatitis still poses the greatest risk.

“There is a very big spiking in hepatitis C infection over the past few decades. And that is the predominant risk factor in the United States for liver cancer,” he said.

Jacoub also suggested another risk factor. He cautioned that “anyone who has hereditary iron overload symptoms,” such as hemochromatosis, is at risk.

“[This] iron scenario causes iron overloading of the liver and [that] causes inflammation and scarring and then … cirrhosis,” he said.

“Whenever cirrhosis develops, you’re immediately at risk for liver cancer,” Jacoub explained.

Read more: Symptoms and warning signs of hepatitis C »

The influx of hepatitis C

“The incidence of hepatitis C in the baby boomer population [those born between 1945 and 1965] is as high as 2 to 3 percent,” reported Bilchik. “And it’s been recommended that all baby boomers should be at least checked for hepatitis C, particularly since recently we [now] have drugs that are very effective at curing patients of hepatitis C.”

Bilchik added, “The biggest breakthrough in this field has been the fact that relatively nontoxic antiviral medications are now FDA-approved that can eradicate hepatitis C.”

“The problem,” he said, “is that a very small percentage of baby boomers are being tested, or have been tested.”

Hepatitis B infection is also preventable. And there is an effective vaccine.

Starting in 1982, hepatitis B vaccinations became a part of routine childhood vaccinations.

As a result, in 2015 the vaccination rate among younger people varied from a low of 83 percent in Idaho, to a high of 98 percent in New Hampshire.

However, only 50 percent of older adults in the United States have been vaccinated.

Read more: Western diets are causing obesity in people around the world »

The risk associated with weight

Studies show that liver cancer risk increases by 26 percent for every five point increase in one’s Body Mass Index (BMI).

More men than women are overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9.) However, a greater number of women fall into the categories of obese (BMI 30-39.9), and class 3 obese (BMI 40+).

Bilchik noted, “Non-insulin dependent diabetes and lack of physical activity are often associated and linked to obesity.”

In the United States, 69 percent of adults over age 20 are overweight.

“It’s well known that up to 25 percent of kids, if not more, are overweight, if not obese,” stated Bilchik.

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Indications are that greater weight control intervention can help, especially among children.

Interventions might help reduce obesity levels, type 2 diabetes, and ultimately liver cancer rates.

Read more: Get the facts on alcohol addiction »

Alcohol, tobacco risk factors

Regardless of amount, drinking alcohol increases your risk of liver cancer.

“Not just in alcoholics,” Bilchik noted, “but also in those people that are considered binge drinkers.”

More effort put into alcohol abuse prevention programs may prove beneficial.

Smokers have a higher risk for liver cancer, too.

Tobacco users increase their risk of liver cancer by approximately 50 percent.

Read more: Poverty linked to poor health »

Race, ethnicity make a difference

There are now treatments for hepatitis C, vaccines for hepatitis B, and better public education about the risks of obesity.

As such, one might expect liver cancer rates to be falling.

But they’re not.

Until the publication of the ACS study, it was difficult to find information that explored total liver cancer mortality and survival rates in the United States.

This was also true for liver cancer mortality and survival rates with regard to race and ethnicity.

Regarding the study, Jacoub noted “liver cancer is one of the few cancers that really has extremely dramatic ethnic variations in population variations. And you’re seeing it in this report.”

The researchers found that the death rate for liver cancer in non-Hispanic whites was 5.5 per 100,000 people.

That compared with 8.4 per 100,000 for blacks, 11.9 per 100,000 for American Indians/Alaska Natives, 9.8 per 100,000 for Asian/Pacific Islanders, and 9.1 per 100,000 for Hispanics.

Digging deeper, the analysis showed that liver cancer incidence varies from state to state, and by race and ethnicity within each state.

Much of the disparity is due to a lack of public health education for certain at-risk groups.

Many of these same populations often also have limited access to quality healthcare.

Read more: Are there early signs of kidney cancer? »

Catching cancer early

The five-year survival rate after a diagnosis of liver cancer has been increasing ever since the early 1990s.

The increase, however, varies among racial and ethnic groups.

Generally, non-Hispanic whites have a lower death rate from liver cancer than blacks.

One of the reasons is that non-Hispanic whites are more likely to undergo surgery for their cancer.

Blacks as a group are more likely to lack health insurance, which may cause people to delay testing.

The stage of liver cancer at the time of diagnosis influences the survival rate.

Between 2006 and 2012, people with localized cancers accounted for between 40 and 45 percent of all liver cancer diagnoses. These patients had a survival rate of 37 percent.

That rate dropped to 4 percent for distant stage cancer diagnoses.

When researchers factored race and ethnicity into their analysis of localized disease, they saw a marked difference in survival rates.

It is possible to narrow the gap in survival rates between ethnic and racial groups?

Researchers believe the key is in finding ways to diagnose more liver cancers when they are still in the early, more localized stages.

Read more: Baby boomers changing the healthcare landscape »

Over the hump by 2030?

Death rates are expected to continue rising through 2030, and then begin to fall. Bilchik and Jacoub suggested a few possible reasons for the decline.

Baby boomers are currently the most at-risk generation for hepatitis C. Their numbers will continue to shrink as time passes.

In the meantime, more effective public health education will increase the number of baby boomers who seek out testing for hepatitis C.

Also, public education efforts worldwide should increase the number of people receiving hepatitis B vaccinations.

In time, the costs of treating hepatitis C will decline.

Fast food restaurants will continue the current trend of offering foods that are more nutritious

The number of tobacco smokers should continue to decline.

Jacoub stressed, “It’s important to know your risk profile.”

And Bilchik pointed out, “If you think about it, primary liver cancer is largely preventable because most of the causes of liver cancer are related to lifestyle.”

Henry Sapiecha

Australian Case of Serogroup Y Invasive Meningococcal Disease

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

QUEENSLAND Health [Australia] has confirmed a case of the deadly, invasive meningococcal disease on the Sunshine Coast with another possible case being monitored.

The confirmed case was not a strain of the dangerous bacteria children would be routinely vaccinated against.

It was a notification of “serogroup Y invasive meningococcal disease”.

Children were vaccinated against the meningococcal C as part of routine childhood immunisations.

Sunshine Coast GP Dr Mason Stevenson said he also had concerns he had a case of “meningism” in a young child yesterday.

Meningisms is a set of symptoms similar to those caused by meningitis.

“I had child yesterday came in with meningisms, the child may have had early meningitis.

“I advised the parents to take the child to hospital if its condition deteriorated further.”

The Australian Department of Health website advised up to one in 10 patients with “invasive meningococcal disease in Australia dies”.

” Of those who survive, one in 30 has severe skin scarring or loss of limbs, and one in 30 has severe brain damage.”

Sunshine Coast toddler Finn Smith nearly died and lost parts of his limbs when he contracted the deadly meningococcal

Dr Stevenson said there was a rise in cases of meningococcal world-wide and a growing push to immunise people against the different strains of the disease.

“We are seeing an emergence of other strains,” he said.

“It can affect a diverse range of ages, particularly the elderly.

“There is a meningococcal vaccine that covers a range of strains, including Y and there is now a push to promote this broad spectrum vaccine.

“Cases like this reinforce the need.”

The strains of the bacteria were continuously evolving to survive.

“The fight against viruses, bacteria and fungi will be an eternal fight as they evolve to find hosts,” Dr Stevenson said.

“That includes human hosts. The (bacteria) can mean death or disability to those affected.”.

But the latest vaccination rates showed an increasing number of people on the Sunshine Coast weren’t taking up their free vaccinations.

“Figures that have come in show Noosa now has the lowest vaccination rate in Queensland at only 85%,” Dr Stevenson said.

“Unfortunately through false science or through apathy or, frankly, neglect parents are not properly vaccinating their children.

“One in six children in the Noosa region now has been inadequately vaccinated.”

The child that presented at his practice with meningisms was one of them.

“This will haunt those children as they become adults,” he said.

“Many will want to travel overseas and will be largely unprotected against more exotic bugs in faraway places.

“Many do suffer as a result and it is largely avoidable.

Henry Sapiecha

YOUR LIVER DISEASE COULD BE TOXIC TONKA BEAN, WARFARIN OR CINNAMON POISONING

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

DRIED TONKA BEANS ON KITCHEN CUTTING BOARD

Coumarin is mostly toxic to the liver, which plays a central role in mopping up poisons and clearing them from the body. As the front-line defence, the organ is extraordinarily resilient, able to regenerate from just a quarter of its original size. Just like alcohol, coumarin is thought to be toxic over the long term, with repeated bouts of damage.

“The problem is it’s not like you’re going to realise when you’ve got to the level where you’re eating too much – the effects build up over years,” says Dirk Lachenmeier from the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Laboratory (CVUA) of Karlsruhe, Germany, who has developed a new way of detecting coumarin in foods.

The easy way to find out is obvious; alas, it turns out feeding people toxic chemicals isn’t allowed. Instead, the safe limits in humans are based on studies in animals, from baboons to dogs. To account for an any differences in our biology, the highest amount which hasn’t caused any harm in animals is multiplied by 100.

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative

For an average-sized person, this works out at a measly one quarter of a tonka bean or a quarter of a cinnamon bun per day – though if you remove the safety factor, your allowance shoots up to more like 25 tonka beans or 20 cinnamon buns (5680 calories, a challenge for even the most hardened binge eaters).

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative. Many animals, including rats and dogs, remove coumarin from the body in a completely different way, breaking it down into highly potent chemicals which are toxic in their own right. Instead, we have enzymes which subtly tweak coumarin’s structure to render it safe. But not all people can do this.

Back in the 90s, a woman arrived at Frankfurt University Hospital with severe liver disease. She was promptly diagnosed with “coumarin-induced hepatitis”, but in fact she hadn’t overdosed on tonka beans. She had been taking the drug warfarin.

What was going on?

MORE HERE

Henry Sapiecha

Just Hours after this photo was taken, she tragically died

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed image www.newcures.info

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed

IT WAS supposed to be a fun night with her friends celebrating her 20th birthday – and when Gabrielle Marsh started to get a headache, no one suspected she would be dead hours later.

Photos of the night show the young Auckland woman raising a toast with her best friends, showing off the platter of food she’d thoughtfully planned and created for the night.

Two hours after those photos were taken Gabby, as she was known, was lying on the floor of her home in agony, her mother Kathryn at her side and an ambulance on its way.

Later that night as Gabby lay hooked up to life support machines Auckland City Hospital staff delivered the heartbreaking news to her family – she had suffered a brain haemorrhage and was unlikely to survive.

The next day a decision was made. Gabby was to be taken off life support – but not until her organs had been donated.

And on Monday March 6, on her 20th birthday, after her family had said their goodbyes, Gabby was taken to surgery.

“The woman at the hospital called me and said it was all done, and the donation was taking place as we speak,” Kathryn Marsh told the NZ Herald.

“Gabby loved doing things for other people, and that was her biggest, most amazing gift.”

Gabby’s organs saved the lives of at least six people; her kidney, pancreas, lungs, liver and heart valves were all successfully donated.

“Of course, more than anything, we would love to have her here, but that’s not to be,” said Kathryn.

“But if anything good can come out of it, if she has helped people, then that’s comforting.”

Gabby was the eldest of three children and is survived by Jacob, 18 and 16-year-old Victoria.

Her death was the second tragedy for her family, her father Shayne died just 17 months ago after a long illness.

“It’s still not really sunken in, it was so sudden,” Kathryn said.

“Shayne was sick for 14 months and we all had time to get used to the idea, but with Gabby it was the complete opposite. It’s left us all a bit shell-shocked.”

Gabby was born and raised in Auckland, attending Mount Albert Grammar School before enrolling at Auckland University.

She was about to start her third year of a double degree in commerce and law when she died.

“She was a really good sister, she was kind, generous and she was like a second mum to me,” Jacob said.

Her family described her as extremely thoughtful and loving, adventurous, caring, a “rock star academic” and a young woman motivated and driven with a lot of energy.

“She had a killer smile that came easy and often,” her aunt Michelle Cliffe said.

Kathryn said she didn’t know where to begin when asked what was special about her eldest child.

“She just made people feel at ease and she was easy to be around. There was something special about Gabby,” she said.

After Shayne died, Gabby was a “phenomenal help” to Kathryn, stepping up to do her share of cooking, cleaning and helping with her siblings.

“She just got stuff done, she was pragmatic, hard working and so organised,” Michelle said.

The day Gabby died she woke early and went for a walk with Kathryn – something they did most days together.

Then the pair went to Newmarket shopping and Gabby helped her mother choose a new swimsuit for an extended family holiday to Fiji in April.

The family ate lunch together and Gabby went to watch her boyfriend Bradley play softball before returning home to prepare for her party.

She didn’t drink alcohol, but prepared pina colada cocktails for her three best friends, making a rum-free version for herself.

The girls had planned to go out in the city that night; Gabby loved old music so wanted to go dancing at Irish bar Danny Doolans.

Bradley was going to pick them up and drive them to town.

Then, Gabby started to complain about having a headache.

“It was getting worse and worse,” Kathryn said.

“She just wanted to lie down. Her friends left, they told her it was okay, that they would celebrate with her another time and they called Bradley to tell him.”

After the girls left, Gabby started throwing up and became agitated and slurring her words.

Kathryn suspected a severe migraine, and called an ambulance.

As the paramedics arrived – and Bradley – Gabby lost consciousness.

She never woke up.

Doctors have told her family they believe she had a arteriovenous malformation (AVM), a tangle of abnormal blood vessels connecting arteries and veins in the brain.

It is likely she was born with the condition and there was nothing her family could have done to detect or prevent her death.

“She was healthy, she exercised, she didn’t drink,” said Kathryn, shaking her head.

“The specialist said it was like a ticking time bomb,” Jacob added.

The family said the decision to donate Gabby’s organs was easy; they knew it was what she wanted as she specified it on her licence, and she was a generous young woman.

“She had such a bright future in front of her and I would have just loved to see her future unfold,” Kathryn said.

“We said goodbye to her and we knew that she was then going off to theatre – that she was the one giving the gifts on her birthday.

“She’s given life to more than six people on her birthday, that is her legacy.”

Jacob was brimming with pride over his sister’s final gift.

“It’s like she is living on in other people,” he said.

The Marsh family urged people to openly discuss organ donation with loved ones and make their wishes known.

They hoped to one day meet some of the people that Gabby’s organs helped.

The Gabby Marsh Scholarship

Gabby’s university friends have started a Givealittle page to fund a scholarship in her name, with the support of her family.

“Gabby was passionate, fun loving and kind. She smiled easily and often. She was selfless, considerate and generous.

She was someone who impacted everyone she met,” her friends said.

“Gabby changed the lives of so many around her, and we dream for her character and kindness to continue changing the life of others.

“To honour her academic ability, her exceptional character and her future cut tragically short, the Gabby Marsh Scholarship will be established and offered annually to enable a young school leaver demonstrating exceptional character and service to fulfil their dream of studying commerce at the University of Auckland.”

More than $20,000 has been donated so far.

To donate or read more, click here.

Thanks to the generosity of 503 deceased organ donors and their families a record 1,447 Australians were given a second chance at life in 2016. There were an additional 267 living donors, including 44 under the Australian Kidney Exchange Program.

To register on the Australian Organ Donor Register, click here.

www.goodgirlsgo.com

club-libido-banner-kelly-lies-in-blue-sheets

Henry Sapiecha

Cystic Fibrosis sufferer and transplant patient Nardya Miller promotes organ donation in her final days of life

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

A DYING Brisbane Qld Australia woman is using her final days to promote the importance of organ donation.

Last Wednesday, 25-year-old Nardya Miller was given a week to live. On Sunday she was submitted to palliative care.

Nardya Miller has been given just a week to live CYSTIC FIBROSIS-SUFFERER image www.newcures.info

The beauty salon owner has Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and her body is rejecting a double lung transplant she had over two years ago, the Sunshine Coast Daily reports.

Ms Miller’s fiance Liam Fitzgerald said it isn’t CF that is killing her, it is the chronic rejection she was diagnosed with three months ago.

“CF was a part of her life for 23 years and got her to needing a bilateral lung transplant but after the first 11 months post surgery, being so perfect, the lungs started to fail, over and over again requiring treatments she never thought she would have to go though.

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems image www.newcures.info

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems.

“She went through rounds of plasmapheresis to try stop donor specific antibodies but nothing worked.”

Mr Fitzgerald said Ms Miller wants everyone to know how important organ donation is.

“The only way people will ever have a second chance at life is to be an organ donor.”

Ms Miller’s cousin Tachae Douglas-Miller said she underwent the lung transplant in 2014 because she was “sick of not being able to breathe and sick of fighting a never ending battle”.

“Although we hear stories on how new lungs had changed people lives, Nardya wasn’t so lucky.

“After undergoing the double lung transplant she didn’t realise she was so ill.”

But instead of letting her illness get the better of her, Ms Douglas-Miller said she started up her own beauty business and bought a house with Mr Fitzgerald, adopting three “beautiful little fur babies”.

“She started to make her dream of opening her own beauty store a reality (because) she didn’t want to stop working as she didn’t want to burden her fiance with debt.

“Unfortunately now, Nardya is losing the battle …(she) won’t be going home.”

Ms Douglas-Miller and her sister Ainsley Douglas-Miller started a Go Fund Me to help keep Ms Miller’s dreams of not leaving her fiance in debt, alive.

Already more than $15,000 has been raised by more than 400 people in six days, smashing the initial $10,000 target.

“We are overwhelmed by everyone’s generosity. I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Despite only having days to live, Ms Douglas-Miller said Ms Miller is still “witty, humorous and talkative”.

“Although we all know what the reality is.”

* If you wish to donate, the details are here.

www.ozrural.com.au

www.club-libido.com

www.goodgirlsgo.com

www.foodpassions.net

Top-banner-lingeriecrossover-10.08.15

Henry Sapiecha

 

Surviving Meningococcal: Ripu Bhatia’s Story on video

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017


Published on Oct 1, 2016

When Ripu contracted meningicoccal septicaemia the doctors put him into a medically induced coma while they fought to save his life. The disease took his arms and legs and his nose. On the first anniversary since contracting the disease Ripu finds himself on a challenging rehabilitation journey. He’s taught himself to play guitar, writes a popular blog, and can still host a great party. But moving beyond the psychological trauma of what’s happened to him is as hard as overcoming the physical challenges he now faces.

club-libido-banner-bw-wheelchair-couple

Henry Sapiecha

Three children hospitalised after contracting meningococcal disease

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

the-most-common-symptoms-for-meningococcal-include-high-fever-and-chills-headaches-stiff-necks-and-purple-areas-on-the-skin-that-appear-as-bruises-image-www-newcures-info

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

“The disease itself is really quite hard to get, and you need to be in very close proximity.”

“The key thing here is they are all from the same family and have all been spending a lot of time together over the holidays. They didn’t just get the infection from being at Southbank.”

It’s understood that Queensland Health is now working to trace the family’s movement over the holiday period and alert those who may have come in contact with the children.

Dr Megan Young, public health physician at Metro North Public Health Unit, confirmed the three children came from Brisbane’s northside but said the “strain of meningococcal disease has yet to be confirmed.”

“The children became ill following an extended family gathering over the holiday break and were admitted on New Year’s Day to LCCH where they continue to receive treatment,” she said.

“Those who had close contact with the children have been identified and the majority provided with information and antibiotics where appropriate.”

Know, Check, Act – Meningococcal Disease

Dr Young said the outbreak serves as a reminder to parents to keep track of their children’s immunisation history.

“The risk of contracting meningococcal disease is very low for contacts, and there is not any increase in risk to the broader community, however this a timely reminder for parents to ensure their vaccinations are up to date,” she said.

“Meningococcal C vaccination is recommended at 12 months of age and is provided free of charge under the National Immunisation Program.”

The disease which is an acute bacterial infection can turn fatal if not treated identified and treated on time and is predominately spread by coughing, sneezing, kissing and sharing food or drink.

The most common symptoms for Meningococcal include high fever and chills, headaches, stiff necks and purple areas on the skin that appear as bruises.

club-libido-banner-condom-in-ladies-jeans

Henry Sapiecha

Hodgkin’s Disease explained here Video presentation.

Friday, December 23rd, 2016

Part 1 of 6

What Is Hodgkin’s Disease?

Hodgkin’s disease (HD) is a type of lymphoma, which is a blood cancer that starts in the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system helps the immune system get rid of waste and fight infections. HD is also called Hodgkin disease, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

HD originates in white blood cells that help protect you from germs and infections. These white blood cells are called lymphocytes. In people with HD, these cells grow abnormally and spread beyond the lymphatic system. As the disease progresses, it makes it more difficult for your body to fight infections.

HD can be either classic Hodgkin’s disease or nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin’s disease (NLPHD). The type of HD is based on the types of cells involved in your condition and their behavior.

The main cause of HD isn’t known. The disease has been linked to cell mutations, or changes, as well as to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which causes mononucleosis. HD can occur at any age, but it most commonly affects people between ages 15 and 40 and people over age 55.

The overall survival rate for HD has increased due to advances in treatment. The five-year survival rate is about 85 percent, and the 10-year survival rate is approximately 81 percent.

Part 2 of 6

What Are the Symptoms of Hodgkin’s Disease?

Symptoms

The most common symptom of HD is swelling of the lymph nodes, which causes a lump to form under the skin. This lump usually isn’t painful. It may form in one or more of the following areas:

  • on the side of the neck
  • in the armpit
  • around the groin

Other symptoms of HD include:

  • night sweats
  • itchy skin
  • fever
  • fatigue
  • unintended weight loss
  • persistent cough
  • pain in the lymph nodes after consuming alcohol
  • enlarged spleen

Call your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms. They can be signs of other conditions, and it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis.

Part 3 of 6

How Is Hodgkin’s Disease Diagnosed?

Diagnosis

To diagnose HD, your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask you about your medical history. Your doctor will also order certain tests to make a proper diagnosis. The following tests may be done:

  • imaging tests, such as X-rays or CT scans
  • lymph node biopsy, which involves removing a piece of lymph node tissue to test for the presence of abnormal cells
  • blood tests, such as a complete blood count (CBC), to measure levels of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets
  • immunophenotyping to determine the type of lymphoma cells that are present
  • lung function tests to determine how well your lungs are working
  • an echocardiogram to determine how well your heart is working
  • bone marrow biopsy, which involves the removal and examination of marrow inside your bones to see if the cancer has spread

Staging

Once an HD diagnosis has been made, the cancer is assigned a stage. Staging describes the extent and severity of the disease. It will help your doctor determine your treatment options and outlook.

There are four general stages of HD:

  • Stage I (early stage) means that cancer is found in one lymph node region.
  • Stage II (locally advanced disease) means that cancer is found in two lymph node regions on one side of the diaphragm, which is the muscle beneath your lung. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node region as well as in a nearby organ.
  • Stage III (advanced disease) means that cancer is found in lymph node regions both above and below your diaphragm. It may also indicate that cancer was found in one lymph node area and in one organ on opposite sides of your diaphragm.
  • Stage IV (widespread disease) means that cancer was found outside the lymph nodes and has spread to other parts of your body, such as your bone marrow, liver, or lung.

Part 4 of 6

How Is Hodgkin’s Disease Treated?

Treatment

Treatment for HD typically depends on the stage of the disease. The main treatment options are chemotherapy and radiation. Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams of radiation to destroy cancer cells. Chemotherapy involves the use of medications that can kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs may be given orally or injected through a vein, depending on the specific medication.

Radiation therapy alone may be sufficient for treating early stage NLPHD. If you have NLPHD, you may only need radiation since the condition tends to spread more slowly than classic HD. In advanced stages, targeted therapeutic drugs may be added to your chemotherapy regimen.

A stem cell transplant may also be used if you don’t respond to chemotherapy or radiation. A stem cell transplant infuses healthy cells called stem cells into your body to replace the cancerous cells in your bone marrow.

After treatment, your doctor will want to follow up with you on a regular basis. Be sure to keep all your medical appointments and follow your doctor’s instructions.

Part 5 of 6

Risks of Treatment for Hodgkin’s Disease

Risk Factors

Treatments for HD can have long-term side effects and can increase your risk of developing other serious medical conditions. Radiation to the chest can increase your risk of:

  • breast cancer
  • lung cancer
  • heart disease
  • high cholesterol

You should get regular mammograms, cholesterol tests, and heart disease screenings to check for these conditions.

It’s also important to attend regular follow-up appointments with your doctor. Make sure to tell them about any concerns you may have about long-term side effects and what you can do to help reduce your risk.

Part 6 of 6

Long-Term Outlook for People with Hodgkin’s Disease

Outlook

Advances in the treatment of HD over the past few decades have greatly increased the survival rate. According to the American Cancer Society, the relative survival rates for all people diagnosed with HD are as follows:

  • The one-year survival rate is about 92 percent.
  • The five -year survival rate is about 85 percent.
  • The 10-year survival rate is about 81 percent.

The following are the five-year survival rates for the different stages:

  • Stage I HD is about 90 percent.
  • Stage II HD is about 90 percent.
  • Stage III HD is about 80 percent.
  • Stage IV HD is about 65 percent.

These rates may vary depending on the stage of the disease and the age of the individual.

Dealing with an HD diagnosis can be challenging. Support groups and counseling can help you manage your anxiety and provide a safe place for you to discuss concerns and feelings about your experience. The National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society also provide resources for people who’ve recently been diagnosed with HD.

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Henry Sapiecha

‘If you don’t vaccinate your kids you’re an absolute fool’

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

Baby Elijah suffering from chickenpox image www.newcures.info

Baby Elijah suffering from chickenpox. Photo: Facebook

The photos are heartbreaking and almost too difficult to look at, but Kayley Burke is begging other parents to take notice.

“Vaccinate your kids people. The pictures below show you exactly why,” the upset Queensland mother posted on Facebook alongside horrifying photos of 11-month-old son Elijah covered in sores from chickenpox.

“Our poor baby boy who is too young to be immunised has caught the chickenpox. It has almost been a week since they showed up. Today he was admitted to Ipswich Hospital with a secondary infection.”

Ms Burke and her three-year-old daughter Kaliah have also contracted chickenpox. But thankfully, as the little girl has been vaccinated, she only has a few spots and is otherwise well.

The mother described adult chickenpox as “horrible and painful”.

“I’d rather give birth with no pain relief,” she wrote.

Elijah before he fell ill.image www.newcures.info

Elijah before he fell ill. Photo: Facebook

“Bottom line if you don’t vaccinate your kids you’re a bloody idiot. Think about the risk you are putting on other helpless kids that are too young or who actually can’t be vaccinated!”

The plight of baby Elijah has touched hearts everywhere. More than 36,000 people have shared the photos since they were posted on Thursday. Others have sent the family messages of support.

“Oh my gosh, poor bub! Can’t stand hearing about stupid selfish people not vaccinating their children,” one commenter wrote

“If even one more person vaccinates because of this post it’d be a win. But you and you family shouldn’t have to go through this. Man it makes me angry,” said another.

Ms Burke told The Sunshine Coast Daily her son had been crying and trying to itch the sores that now cover his entire head. When the baby boy refused to drink his bottle, she realised the sores must have spread inside his mouth and throat.

“It’s horrible I can’t think of anything worse (than watching him go through this),” she said.

“I’m very annoyed that he’s sick. I’m a strong believer in vaccinations and I’m sure if he was old enough to have the shot he wouldn’t be so sick.”

Chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and it is a highly infectious disease. It causes an itchy red rash with blisters and while most people recover, it can cause serious complications.

Immunisation against chickenpox is included in the combination measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) vaccine for children at 18 months.

Children who are vaccinated against chicken pox may still get the virus, however their symptoms will be mild and it is unlikely any complications will result.

KIDS STUFF

Henry Sapiecha