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HUGE LIST OF HERBS USED FOR DISEASE TREATMENTS CURES & BENEFITS-SHARE

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This information has been supplied by herbs-info.com

List Of Herbs

On this page you will find our alphabetical list of 150+ 189 herbs! Every herb in our list has its own dedicated page on this site – with pictures and very detailed info! Follow the links to learn more about each herb. The goal of the individual herbs’ pages is to gather information about the plant in one place, so that anyone researching it can have quick access to information.

Please bookmark this page so that you can use it as a “quick lookup” when you want to learn all about a herb. You can also share our image on Facebook and Pinterest. Each herb page follows a similar format – starting with names for the herb in different languages, then giving background and history, common and traditional uses of the herb, scientific research, esoteric uses and safety notes.

Our method of organization intentionally follows the style of the old herbals, which listed the plants in alphabetical order and often compiled the writings of other herbalists from past times. There is much material to work through and so this list is continuing to expand. Ok, here is the list!

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The Herbs:There are many more to yet come.

Agrimony | Ajwain | Alfalfa | Alkanet | Allspice | Aloe Vera | Althaea Officinalis (Marsh Mallow) | Amla | Angelica | Angostura | Anise | Arabian Jasmine | Arnica | Arrach | Artemisia | Asafoetida | Ashwagandha | Bacopa Monnieri | Bashful Mimosa | Basil | Bay Laurel | Bean | Bears Breech | Belladonna | Benzoin | Bergamot | Betony | Bilberry | Bitter Melon | Black Pepper | Blackberry Bush | Blumea Camphor | Boneset | Borage | Brooklime | Bryony | Bugle | Burdock | Butterbur | Cacao | Cajeput | Calendula | Canella | Capers | Cardamom | Carob Tree | Cascara Sagrada | Cascarilla | Catechu | Catnip | Cat’s Whiskers | Catsfoot | Cayenne | Cedron | Celery | Centory | Chamomile | Cheken | Chervil | Chinese Honeysuckle | Chives | Cilantro | Cinnamon | Clavo Huasca | Clove | Coltsfoot | Comfrey | Contrayerba | Copal | Cordyceps | Cumin | Daffodil | Damiana | Dandelion | Deadly Nightshade | Dill | Dittany Of Crete | Dodder | Dragon’s Blood | Echinacea | Elder | Epazote | Female Peony | Fennel | Fenugreek | Feverfew | Five Leaved Chaste Tree | Flax | Frankincense | Galangal | Garlic | Gentian | Ginger | Gingko Biloba | Ginseng | Goat’s Rue | Goji | Golden Seal | Gotu Kola | Green Tea | Guarana | Guava | Hearts Ease | Heavenly Elixir | Hedge Nettle | Henna | Hibiscus | Hollyhocks | Holy Basil | Holy Basil | Honeysuckle | Hops | Horny Goat Weed | Horseradish | Horsetail | Hyacinth | Indian Laurel | Jew’s Mallow | Juniper | Kava | Ladies Mantle | Lady’s Thistle | Lavender | Lead Tree | Lemon Balm | Lemongrass | Lesser Calamint | Licorice | Lily of the Valley | Male Satyrion | Marjoram | Milk Thistle | Moringa | Mountain Apple | Mugwort | Mullein | Neem | Nelumbo Nucifera | Nutmeg | Nymphaea Caerulea | Onion | Oregano | Orris Root | Paprika | Parsley | Passion Flower | Patchouli | Pepper Elder | Pimiento Pepper | Plantain | Primrose | Queen’s Flower | Red Clover | Reishi | Rhubarb | Ringworm Bush | Rooibos | Rosemary | Rue | Saffron | Sage | Savory | Saw Palmetto | Seaweed | Senna | Slippery Elm | Snake Needle Grass | Snakeweed | Soapnuts | Solomon’s Seal | Spearmint | Spiny Sapindus | St. John’s Wort | St Thomas Bean | Star Anise | Starfruit | Stinging Nettle | Sumac | Sweetsop | Tamarind | Tarragon | Tea | Thyme | Turmeric | Uva-Ursi | Valerian | Vanilla | Vervain | Water Hyssop | Wild Oregano | Wild Tea | Witch Hazel | Yarrow | Yerba Mate |

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Henry Sapiecha

Substance In Ginger Found 10,000x As Effective as Chemo Against Breast Cancer Stem Cells

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

An intriguing and possibly highly important study [1] has recently been published regarding the action of 6-shogaol (a ginger compound) against cancer cells. This study has been “doing the rounds” on social media but in many cases it has been misreported and highly misrepresented – either through misunderstanding of the (admittedly a little complex) science involved – or through deliberate exaggeration of the facts in order to create “headline sizzle”. Many of the social media articles we saw did not even link to the original research!

We’re going to do our best to clear it all up for you today, “joining the dots” with some of the other amazing research that is being done in this field and attempting to interpret the studies in terms that both make sense to the lay person and won’t offend persons of science.

Short Summary:

The quick takeaway for those in a hurry: 6-shogaol, a compound in ginger, has been found to have amazing activity against breast cancer cells in cell cultures in the lab – including action against simulations of “stem cells” – the “mother ship” of cancer cells that chemo showed no activity against even at 10,000x concentration. The action of 6-Shogaol against the cancer cells happens at concentrations that do very little harm to healthy cells. Other studies have shown that these ginger compounds are bio-absorbed but are converted into other forms in the body, leaving some uncertainty as to whether these new forms are as active, more active or less active against actual cancer. Recent research however has found a strong possibility that ginger may have an actual anti-cancer action in vivo, leading us to conclude that ginger should be considered a prime candidate for inclusion in an “anti-cancer diet” (subject to approval from your physician of course! We have to say this; we do not make actual medicinal recommendations for legal reasons.)

Ginger Compound vs. Chemotherapy (Taxol):

In this in vitro study, 6-Shogaol showed astonishing activity against “spheroids” – stem cell-like simulations – against which taxol (standard chemotherapy treatment derived from yew tree) showed no activity at even 10,000x the concentration. [1] The inability of taxol to kill the stem cells has been a past stumbling block of cancer therapy. 6-shogaol was found “only” 2 to 5 times as active than taxol against the “regular” breast cancer cells (still an impressive result).

What’s really awesome is that 6-shogaol showed high selectivity – and normal (non-cancerous) cells showed strong resistance to it even after 6 days. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. [1]

This study adds to the impressive list of studies in which ginger compounds have been found highly active against cancer cells in vitro while also showing very high selectivity, not harming normal / healthy cells.

However what remains to be fully understood (this is an essential point) is the bioavailability of 6-shogaol after digestion. In other words, an in vitro study such as this does not indicate whether or not eating ginger will do you any good, because if 6-shogaol is broken down by stomach acids, it is unlikely to reach its intended site anyway. Even if it does make it into the bloodstream – how will it “get inside” the cancer? The “metabolic fate” of compounds which destroy cancer cells in in vitro studies are often overlooked by the casual researcher (and the numerous social media outlets reporting on such matters) – and so the “first step” in your education on this matter should be to understand that an in vitro study such as this cannot be considered as evidence in any way that the nutrient will have an effect on cancer.

That said, it might. We did a little research…

Ginger Phytochemistry:

The chemical constituents of ginger (and ginger supplements) have been known for some years [2][3]. 6-shogaol is one of the 4 main pungent constituents of ginger [4] (the others are 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol and 10-gingerol. Shogaols are chemically similar to gingerols – being the dehydrated form thereof. Interestingly, Shogaols are found in only small quantities in the fresh root and are mainly found in the dried and thermally treated roots; with 6-shogaol becoming the most abundant of these constituents when ginger is dried or cooked. [5] There are smaller amounts of other gingerols, shogaols and many further compounds in ginger; these are largely untested but may contribute significantly to the health benefits of the whole root.

Bioavailability Of 6-Shogaol:

As it happens, a 2010 study has investigated the bioavailability of 6-shogaol. [4] Their notes reported first of all that prior to that study, few studies had examined the bioavailability of 6-Shogaol. They stated: “Despite ginger being investigated in over 30 clinical trials in humans with over 2300 subjects, only a handful of studies in rats and our study in healthy volunteers have examined the absorption, bioavailability, metabolites and elimination of ginger constituents. In rat studies, only two of the pungent

compounds, 6-gingerol and zingerone, have been investigated, and in two of the rat studies 6-gingerol was administered as an intravenous bolus, which is unlikely to be reflective of usual oral dosing. Moreover, until we conducted a study in healthy volunteers no pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted in humans nor had any studies in mammals or in vitro examined the other major pungent constituents, namely 8- and 10-gingerols and 6-shogaols.” [4]

A further study from the same team studied 6-shogoal in a clinical trial to determine whether it is passed to the bloodstream intact. [6] It was found that 6-shogoal is absorbed by the body after oral dosing but is bio-converted (either in the liver or intestinal mucosa, researchers were not sure) to glucuronide conjugates – which can be detected in serum for a few hours after ingestion; before being eliminated by the body’s natural processes.

The researchers summarized succinctly here: “In [previous] study, 6-shogaol [had been] found to induce apoptosis, autophagocytosis and growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells at 2.21 μg/mL (7.5 μmol/L). All of these in vitro studies required higher concentrations of free ginger constituents than found in the serum in this study – putting the clinical validity of these and similar studies in question. However, gingerols and shogaols may reach higher serum concentrations within target tissue compared to serum, e.g., gut. Ginger conjugates may also be as or more biologically active compared to parent compound. Clearly, further research is needed to answer these questions and determine the cancer prevention relevance of ginger.”

Action Of Ginger Compounds Against Cancer In Vivo:

This research appears to be underway and we are getting closer to a positive result: A further study from the esteemed Oxford University Press, published in Carcinogenesis (2014) [7], has found astonishing synergistic results for the anti-cancer use of whole ginger extract in vivo against human prostate cancer cell lines – demonstrating that ginger extract “showed 2.4-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than” isolated constituents. In addition, gingerol glucuronides were detected in feces upon intravenous administration confirming hepatobiliary elimination. [7]

This important result from a prestigious journal is a “double-win” for herbalism – being not only highly indicative that ginger metabolites may possibly be bioactive against cancer cells in the human body, but also demonstrating the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts.

We await further study with anticipation! In the meantime, ginger is generally recognized as a healthy, safe addition to the diet and one noted by innumerable studies for its health benefits and potential for protection against disease. I believe that those considering an “anti cancer diet” should (with the advice of their physician) hold ginger in high esteem in both raw and dried/cooked form.

The message here is clear: Nature works best when not tampered with – and it makes sense. After all, we did evolve over hundreds of thousands of years in a pure natural environment. Researchers are starting to catch up to what herbalists have known all along – that we are bioattuned to nature and literally “designed by evolution” to thrive on food in the most natural state possible.

Finally – if you happen to chance upon headlines “ginger 10000x as effective as chemo”… now you know the actual facts…

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Further reading:

Our full “Herbal Report” on ginger.

10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Ginger

Scientists Find Substance In Ginger Kills 91% of Leukemia Cells and Shrinks Tumors in Vivo

References:

[1] 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death. PLOSone (Sept 2014). http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137614 (Full Text)

[2] Fresh organically grown ginger (Zingiber officinale): composition and effects on LPS-induced PGE2 production. Phytochemistry (2004). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15280001

[3] Identification and Quantification of Gingerols and Related Compounds in Ginger Dietary Supplements Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry. J Agric Food Chem (2010). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2783668/ (Full Text)

[4] Quantitation of 6-, 8- and 10-Gingerols and 6-Shogaol in Human Plasma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection. Int J Biomed Sci. (2010). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2975369/

[5] 6-Shogaol https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shogaol

[6] Pharmacokinetics of 6-, 8-, 10-Gingerols and 6-Shogaol and Conjugate Metabolites in Healthy Human Subjects. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers (2009) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2676573/ (Full Text)

[7] Enterohepatic recirculation of bioactive ginger phytochemicals is associated with enhanced tumor growth-inhibitory activity of ginger extract. Carcinogenesis (2014). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24431413

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Henry Sapiecha

10 cancer symptoms you should look out for & do not ignore them

Sunday, November 12th, 2017

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Most of us think we know the telltale signs of cancer: a lump in the breast, unexplainable tiredness, sudden weight loss… but experts are pointing to lesser known symptoms to watch out for that may lead to earlier detection of the disease.

Professor of medical oncology at Southampton University and lead clinician for Cancer Research UK, Peter Johnson says many early signals are “vague and non-specific”.

“It’s these that people need to be aware of and report to their doctors. But we’re not good at paying attention to our own bodies, to what’s normal for us, so we ignore minor symptoms which occasionally can be caused by early cancer,” he told The Telegraph.

Clinical oncologist Dr David Bloomfield says in most cases catching the disease in its early stages ensures a cure.

He says it’s important to not only be aware of the symptoms noted below, but if something else appears unusual and doesn’t go away in a couple of weeks, get it checked out.

Here are 10 symptoms to note that could lead to early cancer detection:
1. A hoarse or croaky voice

This can be a common component of a cold, but if it persists it should be checked out. The symptom can indicate “an early, curable head or neck cancer such as one of the vocal cords,” says Dr Bloomfield.

2. Heavy night sweats

While the summer heat or the onset of menopause in women could more than likely be the cause of night sweats, it’s a symptom that could also be a sign of lymphoma.

Dr Shankara Paneesha, consultant haematologist in Birmingham, told The Telegraph: “People with lymphoma have high metabolisms because lymphoma cells use a lot of energy, so they get severe, drenching night sweats where they need to change their pyjamas and sometimes the bedding.”

3. Persistent heartburn

For many, heartburn is a common issue following a particularly spicy or fatty meal. But if your heartburn lasts more than two to three weeks and requires regular antacid medication it could signal stomach or oesophageal cancer.

Occasionally it can be linked to ovarian or pancreatic cancer.

4. Middle back pain

For the vast majority, back pain is due to a musculoskeletal issue. But for some it can be a symptom of pancreatic cancer.

Pippa Corrie, consultant and associate lecturer in medical oncology at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust says there is a particular sign to note:

“The classic symptom is pain in the upper abdomen that spreads out across the back,” she says.

Situated at the back of the abdomen, as the pancreas grows, it begins to invade nerves which signal back pain.

“While most musculoskeletal back pain will occur in the lower back, that associated with pancreatic cancer is about a hand’s breadth above that and may also come with other symptoms, such as people being off their food, tiredness and weight loss.”

5. Post-menopausal bleeding

This can be a sign of endometrial cancer. Dr Bloomfield says any kind of post-menopausal bleeding should be checked with your GP.

Endometrial cancer is also associated with being overweight.

6. Trouble urinating

As men age, the prostate gland grows. This can increase the need to urinate, especially at night.

Difficulty passing urine or needing to go more frequently could indicate prostate cancer.

7. Finding it hard to swallow

Trouble swallowing can be an indication of a stroke or brain but occasionally it can be an early symptom of a head and neck cancer such as of the vocal cords, oesophagus, mouth or tongue.

Most commonly found in those who smoke and drink regularly, other symptoms can include pain at the back of the mouth.

8. Changes in stools

Blood in faeces is a commonly known indication of bowel cancer. But it’s also important to note any sudden changes in colour, frequency and pain.

In rare cases it can also be an indicator of ovarian or pancreatic cancer.

9. A persistent sore

Changes to moles including itching and bleeding are commonly known as symptoms of skin cancer. Other symptoms include small lumps on the skin that continue to grow, and some cases produce an ulcer that won’t heal.

10. Mouth ulcers

The majority of mouth ulcers are from a viral infection, will clear up in three to four days and are notably painful.

An ulcer in the mouth or on the tongue which lasts for three to four weeks and may or may not be painful could indicate cancer.

Also look for white marks on the tongue or thick, white patches. These need to be checked by your GP as they indicate changes to the mouth’s lining which could lead to cancer.

Henry Sapiecha

Scientists ‘can’t explain’ Black Death plague outbreak

Monday, October 30th, 2017

An image of the Ebola virus under a microscope.

PLAGUE warnings were being issued for nine countries in south-east Africa this week, as authorities rushed to contain an outbreak of Black Death.

It’s the same virus that led to one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, killing an estimated 25 million people in Medieval Europe.

The recent outbreak is believed to have started in Madagascar, an island nation off the African coast, and at least 1300 people have been infected.

It’s a serious bacterial infection transmitted by fleas, and can be easily treated with antibiotics, but so far 124 have been reported dead.

“Plague, though terrifying, is nothing new in Madagascar, where about 600 cases are reported annually,” the World Health Organisation said on its website.

However, WHO officials warned there is “something different” about this outbreak, and “health officials couldn’t explain it”.

“Plague is a disease of poverty, because it thrives in places with poor sanitary conditions and health services,” said Dr Arthur Rakotonjanabelo.

However, he said the plague had spread to new parts of the country, which hadn’t seen the plague since at least 1950.

SO WHEN WILL THE NEXT OUTBREAK BE?

Scientists have known about it since 1976, but it took the world by surprise three years ago.

Global health authorities are constantly trying to predict the next outbreak – bacterial or viral – so it can be stopped before it becomes an epidemic or pandemic.

The Global Virome Project, which was proposed in 2016 and is just beginning to take shape, is one ambitious initiative which aims to find all viruses in birds and mammals that could spill over to humans in the next decade.

Meanwhile, the US Agency for International Development has spent the past eight years cataloguing threats, identifying 1000 new viruses.

However, experts estimate 99.9 per cent of viruses are still unknown.

A new Australian study, published this week by Jemma Geoghegan from Macquarie University and Edward Holmes from the University of Sydney, argued it’s impossible to predict a global outbreak because there are too many variables.

They said efforts will fail because the enormous number of unknown viruses could evolve and appear in humans at any time.

“The [Global Virome Project] will be great for understanding more about viruses and their evolution, but I don’t see how it’ll help us work out what’s going to infect us,” Dr Geoghegan told The Atlantic‘s Ed Yong.

“We’re only just coming to terms with the vastness of the virosphere.”

Once a virus achieves human-to-human transmission, it’s really just a matter of luck as to how severe and contagious it is, and whether or not it can be treated quickly.

EVOLUTION CAN BE GREAT, AND TERRIBLE

Scientists are always trying to identify the next threat before it reaches epidemic or pandemic proportions

Both humans and diseases are constantly changing, so it’s a bit like trying to hit a moving target from a moving car.

“We’re trying to predict really, really rare events from not much information, which I think is going to fail,” Dr Geoghegan said – and history agrees.

For example, scientists discovered the Zika virus in Uganda way back in 1947, and yet there was an outbreak on the other side of the world, in Brazil, two years ago.

The disease is spread by mosquitoes, and can cause severe birth defects in babies if the mother is bitten while pregnant.

Similarly, the Ebola virus was discovered in 1976 in South Sudan, but it claimed a reported 11,315 lives in west Africa three years ago.

It is highly infectious and spreads through transmission of bodily fluids, causing a gruesome death as the whole body haemorrhages.

Still other diseases emerge totally out of the blue.

One example is the SARS virus – a severe form of pneumonia – which broke out in China after a researcher accidentally caught it in a lab in 2002.

Another is HIV, a sexually transmitted virus which attacks the body’s immune system, which has claimed an estimated 35 million lives in the past 40 years.

Probably the most famous of all is the Spanish Influenza pandemic, which killed up to 100 million people – or five per cent of the world’s population – in 1918.

The other variable is changes to possible treatments – which vary widely depending if the outbreak is bacterial or viral.

Vaccines are undoubtedly the best way to treat viruses, because they require living hosts to multiply and can only really be fought off by the body’s own immune system, but they are a prevention and not a cure.

Bacteria, on the other hand, can be effectively treated with antibiotics – however, health experts warn an “antibiotic apocalypse” is fast approaching, as overuse of drugs like Penicillin lead to a significant increase in drug-resistant infections.

DOES SCIENCE HAVE A WAY FORWARD?

Dr Geoghegan thinks the best way forward is to focus just on the “fault lines”.

The Atlantic reports that means regions where people are more likely to be exposed to animal viruses because they are chopping down forests, setting up dense animal markets, hunting wild creatures for meat, or moving around a lot because of political instability.

However, others argue global scientific efforts shouldn’t be so readily dismissed.

Professor Jonna Mazet, global director for PREDICT, a European Union organisation that aims to prepare for the “domino effect” in crisis situations, told Ed Yong it’s too early to know how things will pan out.

She said if the same complaints had been made about meteorology a century ago, “we wouldn’t have created the data that lets us forecast the weather, which we can do pretty well now”.

Henry Sapiecha

ENZYMES FROM PINEAPPLE THAT DESTROY CANCER CELLS

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

So what is this secret weapon?

Enzymes.

Dr. Wright explains that cancers are smart.

It’s because they’re experts at hiding for long periods of time. Most don’t need oxygen to live. And even when we “kill” cancer with conventional treatments, if just one cell survives…

It’s likely to start the disease process all over again.

As Dr. Wright explains, cancers are “built to survive.”

You see, cancers are able to hide because they have a secret “cloaking device.” It’s called fibrin.

It’s the same stuff scar tissue is made from. And cancer cells are covered in it.

Think of fibrin like a shield of armour.

This armor protects the cancer cells from anything that tries to destroy it.

It doesn’t matter if it’s your body’s natural defenses (like natural killer cells or white blood cells) or chemo drugs…

That fibrin is like a fortress, keeping cancer-killing soldiers out.

Fibrin is a sticky protein that forms a web of scar tissue around injuries. And that’s a good thing if you have an injury.

But here’s the problem: Inflammation causes your body to OVERPRODUCE fibrin in a big way

Check out the research published in the journal Medical Hypotheses:

“The tumor dons a ‘coat’ of the host’s own protein on its cell surface. The coat is composed of fibrin and of a polymeric form of human serum albumin (HSA)… Such a coated tumor appears as ‘self’ to the immune system, and thus is not detected as a tumor by the immune system…

When tumors are prepared for in vitro assays against drugs, they are routinely treated with proteolytic enzymes… which dissolve the protein coat, exposing the tumor cell surface to the drug.”

The reason why some cancer drugs may appear to work in laboratory testing and then fail to work in real people may be due to the cancer shield — it’s broken down with proteolytic enzymes during the lab tests but not in the real world, unless, possibly, the patients happen to be taking proteolytic enzymes.

Enzymes have been used in studies of cancer treatment before.

***In 2007, an animal study published in the journal Planta Medica found that

In 2007, an animal study published in the journal Planta Medica found that bromelain, an enzyme found in pineapple cores, treated cancer better than a chemotherapy drug — without toxic side effects.

Your Best “Weapon” to Fight Inflammation

The “proteolytic enzymes”  are your body’s MOST POTENT WEAPON against chronic inflammation.

And the chronic inflammation that proteolytic enzymes fight are also behind many of today’s most dangerous diseases, including:

> Various forms of cancer

> Heart disease

> Arthritis

> Alzheimer’s

> Chronic fatigue  

> Allergies  

> Fibromyalgia  

> COPD  

> Multiple skin diseases

And many more!

The proteolytic enzymes have even been shown to help heal varicose veins… keloids… other scar tissue… age spots… and much more!

Now this isn’t because it’s some “magical cure-all.”

It’s because proteolytic enzymes are produced naturally in your body and are designed to do the “pain-stopping, disease-fighting heavy-lifting”…

But the older you get, the more DEFICIENT in these proteolytic powerhouses you become.

Henry Sapiecha

Why Liver Cancer Numbers Continue to Increase

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

The five-year survival rate for people with liver cancer remains at only 20 percent. Diabetes, hepatitis C, smoking, and alcohol are all factors.

Between 2009 and 2013, doctors diagnosed liver cancer in 7.7 people out of every 100,000.

That number has been increasing since the mid-1970s.

In addition, the death rate is rising faster than for any other cancer — it is one of America’s leading causes of cancer death.

Between 2010 and 2014, it stood at 6.3 people per 100,000.

The five-year survival rate is only about 20 percent.

Healthline spoke with Dr. Jack Jacoub, medical oncologist and director of thoracic oncology at MemorialCare Cancer Institute at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in California.

He stated that liver cancer is “the second most common cancer killer in the world.”

This month, researchers at the American Cancer Society (ACS) published a groundbreaking study in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

During the study, researchers uncovered trends in liver cancer incidence, survival, and mortality rates.

Researchers used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program data obtained from the National Center for Health Statistics.

Read more: Get the facts on liver cancer »

Risk factors

The following risk factors contribute to liver cancer:

Dr. Anton Bilchik, professor of surgery and chief of gastrointestinal research at John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in California, also spoke with Healthline.

Bilchik said “the reason for the increase in primary liver cancer is largely related to the obesity epidemic that we have going on in this country.”

“Whereas hepatitis C used to be the most common cause of liver cancer, the most common cause now is related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease,” he noted.

Jacoub, meanwhile, believes that hepatitis still poses the greatest risk.

“There is a very big spiking in hepatitis C infection over the past few decades. And that is the predominant risk factor in the United States for liver cancer,” he said.

Jacoub also suggested another risk factor. He cautioned that “anyone who has hereditary iron overload symptoms,” such as hemochromatosis, is at risk.

“[This] iron scenario causes iron overloading of the liver and [that] causes inflammation and scarring and then … cirrhosis,” he said.

“Whenever cirrhosis develops, you’re immediately at risk for liver cancer,” Jacoub explained.

Read more: Symptoms and warning signs of hepatitis C »

The influx of hepatitis C

“The incidence of hepatitis C in the baby boomer population [those born between 1945 and 1965] is as high as 2 to 3 percent,” reported Bilchik. “And it’s been recommended that all baby boomers should be at least checked for hepatitis C, particularly since recently we [now] have drugs that are very effective at curing patients of hepatitis C.”

Bilchik added, “The biggest breakthrough in this field has been the fact that relatively nontoxic antiviral medications are now FDA-approved that can eradicate hepatitis C.”

“The problem,” he said, “is that a very small percentage of baby boomers are being tested, or have been tested.”

Hepatitis B infection is also preventable. And there is an effective vaccine.

Starting in 1982, hepatitis B vaccinations became a part of routine childhood vaccinations.

As a result, in 2015 the vaccination rate among younger people varied from a low of 83 percent in Idaho, to a high of 98 percent in New Hampshire.

However, only 50 percent of older adults in the United States have been vaccinated.

Read more: Western diets are causing obesity in people around the world »

The risk associated with weight

Studies show that liver cancer risk increases by 26 percent for every five point increase in one’s Body Mass Index (BMI).

More men than women are overweight (BMI 25.0-29.9.) However, a greater number of women fall into the categories of obese (BMI 30-39.9), and class 3 obese (BMI 40+).

Bilchik noted, “Non-insulin dependent diabetes and lack of physical activity are often associated and linked to obesity.”

In the United States, 69 percent of adults over age 20 are overweight.

“It’s well known that up to 25 percent of kids, if not more, are overweight, if not obese,” stated Bilchik.

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Indications are that greater weight control intervention can help, especially among children.

Interventions might help reduce obesity levels, type 2 diabetes, and ultimately liver cancer rates.

Read more: Get the facts on alcohol addiction »

Alcohol, tobacco risk factors

Regardless of amount, drinking alcohol increases your risk of liver cancer.

“Not just in alcoholics,” Bilchik noted, “but also in those people that are considered binge drinkers.”

More effort put into alcohol abuse prevention programs may prove beneficial.

Smokers have a higher risk for liver cancer, too.

Tobacco users increase their risk of liver cancer by approximately 50 percent.

Read more: Poverty linked to poor health »

Race, ethnicity make a difference

There are now treatments for hepatitis C, vaccines for hepatitis B, and better public education about the risks of obesity.

As such, one might expect liver cancer rates to be falling.

But they’re not.

Until the publication of the ACS study, it was difficult to find information that explored total liver cancer mortality and survival rates in the United States.

This was also true for liver cancer mortality and survival rates with regard to race and ethnicity.

Regarding the study, Jacoub noted “liver cancer is one of the few cancers that really has extremely dramatic ethnic variations in population variations. And you’re seeing it in this report.”

The researchers found that the death rate for liver cancer in non-Hispanic whites was 5.5 per 100,000 people.

That compared with 8.4 per 100,000 for blacks, 11.9 per 100,000 for American Indians/Alaska Natives, 9.8 per 100,000 for Asian/Pacific Islanders, and 9.1 per 100,000 for Hispanics.

Digging deeper, the analysis showed that liver cancer incidence varies from state to state, and by race and ethnicity within each state.

Much of the disparity is due to a lack of public health education for certain at-risk groups.

Many of these same populations often also have limited access to quality healthcare.

Read more: Are there early signs of kidney cancer? »

Catching cancer early

The five-year survival rate after a diagnosis of liver cancer has been increasing ever since the early 1990s.

The increase, however, varies among racial and ethnic groups.

Generally, non-Hispanic whites have a lower death rate from liver cancer than blacks.

One of the reasons is that non-Hispanic whites are more likely to undergo surgery for their cancer.

Blacks as a group are more likely to lack health insurance, which may cause people to delay testing.

The stage of liver cancer at the time of diagnosis influences the survival rate.

Between 2006 and 2012, people with localized cancers accounted for between 40 and 45 percent of all liver cancer diagnoses. These patients had a survival rate of 37 percent.

That rate dropped to 4 percent for distant stage cancer diagnoses.

When researchers factored race and ethnicity into their analysis of localized disease, they saw a marked difference in survival rates.

It is possible to narrow the gap in survival rates between ethnic and racial groups?

Researchers believe the key is in finding ways to diagnose more liver cancers when they are still in the early, more localized stages.

Read more: Baby boomers changing the healthcare landscape »

Over the hump by 2030?

Death rates are expected to continue rising through 2030, and then begin to fall. Bilchik and Jacoub suggested a few possible reasons for the decline.

Baby boomers are currently the most at-risk generation for hepatitis C. Their numbers will continue to shrink as time passes.

In the meantime, more effective public health education will increase the number of baby boomers who seek out testing for hepatitis C.

Also, public education efforts worldwide should increase the number of people receiving hepatitis B vaccinations.

In time, the costs of treating hepatitis C will decline.

Fast food restaurants will continue the current trend of offering foods that are more nutritious

The number of tobacco smokers should continue to decline.

Jacoub stressed, “It’s important to know your risk profile.”

And Bilchik pointed out, “If you think about it, primary liver cancer is largely preventable because most of the causes of liver cancer are related to lifestyle.”

Henry Sapiecha

Australian Case of Serogroup Y Invasive Meningococcal Disease

Saturday, June 24th, 2017

QUEENSLAND Health [Australia] has confirmed a case of the deadly, invasive meningococcal disease on the Sunshine Coast with another possible case being monitored.

The confirmed case was not a strain of the dangerous bacteria children would be routinely vaccinated against.

It was a notification of “serogroup Y invasive meningococcal disease”.

Children were vaccinated against the meningococcal C as part of routine childhood immunisations.

Sunshine Coast GP Dr Mason Stevenson said he also had concerns he had a case of “meningism” in a young child yesterday.

Meningisms is a set of symptoms similar to those caused by meningitis.

“I had child yesterday came in with meningisms, the child may have had early meningitis.

“I advised the parents to take the child to hospital if its condition deteriorated further.”

The Australian Department of Health website advised up to one in 10 patients with “invasive meningococcal disease in Australia dies”.

” Of those who survive, one in 30 has severe skin scarring or loss of limbs, and one in 30 has severe brain damage.”

Sunshine Coast toddler Finn Smith nearly died and lost parts of his limbs when he contracted the deadly meningococcal

Dr Stevenson said there was a rise in cases of meningococcal world-wide and a growing push to immunise people against the different strains of the disease.

“We are seeing an emergence of other strains,” he said.

“It can affect a diverse range of ages, particularly the elderly.

“There is a meningococcal vaccine that covers a range of strains, including Y and there is now a push to promote this broad spectrum vaccine.

“Cases like this reinforce the need.”

The strains of the bacteria were continuously evolving to survive.

“The fight against viruses, bacteria and fungi will be an eternal fight as they evolve to find hosts,” Dr Stevenson said.

“That includes human hosts. The (bacteria) can mean death or disability to those affected.”.

But the latest vaccination rates showed an increasing number of people on the Sunshine Coast weren’t taking up their free vaccinations.

“Figures that have come in show Noosa now has the lowest vaccination rate in Queensland at only 85%,” Dr Stevenson said.

“Unfortunately through false science or through apathy or, frankly, neglect parents are not properly vaccinating their children.

“One in six children in the Noosa region now has been inadequately vaccinated.”

The child that presented at his practice with meningisms was one of them.

“This will haunt those children as they become adults,” he said.

“Many will want to travel overseas and will be largely unprotected against more exotic bugs in faraway places.

“Many do suffer as a result and it is largely avoidable.

Henry Sapiecha

YOUR LIVER DISEASE COULD BE TOXIC TONKA BEAN, WARFARIN OR CINNAMON POISONING

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

DRIED TONKA BEANS ON KITCHEN CUTTING BOARD

Coumarin is mostly toxic to the liver, which plays a central role in mopping up poisons and clearing them from the body. As the front-line defence, the organ is extraordinarily resilient, able to regenerate from just a quarter of its original size. Just like alcohol, coumarin is thought to be toxic over the long term, with repeated bouts of damage.

“The problem is it’s not like you’re going to realise when you’ve got to the level where you’re eating too much – the effects build up over years,” says Dirk Lachenmeier from the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Laboratory (CVUA) of Karlsruhe, Germany, who has developed a new way of detecting coumarin in foods.

The easy way to find out is obvious; alas, it turns out feeding people toxic chemicals isn’t allowed. Instead, the safe limits in humans are based on studies in animals, from baboons to dogs. To account for an any differences in our biology, the highest amount which hasn’t caused any harm in animals is multiplied by 100.

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative

For an average-sized person, this works out at a measly one quarter of a tonka bean or a quarter of a cinnamon bun per day – though if you remove the safety factor, your allowance shoots up to more like 25 tonka beans or 20 cinnamon buns (5680 calories, a challenge for even the most hardened binge eaters).

For most people, the current limit is probably ultra conservative. Many animals, including rats and dogs, remove coumarin from the body in a completely different way, breaking it down into highly potent chemicals which are toxic in their own right. Instead, we have enzymes which subtly tweak coumarin’s structure to render it safe. But not all people can do this.

Back in the 90s, a woman arrived at Frankfurt University Hospital with severe liver disease. She was promptly diagnosed with “coumarin-induced hepatitis”, but in fact she hadn’t overdosed on tonka beans. She had been taking the drug warfarin.

What was going on?

MORE HERE

Henry Sapiecha

Just Hours after this photo was taken, she tragically died

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed image www.newcures.info

Gabrielle Marsh died hours after this photo was taken. She was celebrating her upcoming 20th birthday at home with friends when she suffered a catastrophic brain bleed

IT WAS supposed to be a fun night with her friends celebrating her 20th birthday – and when Gabrielle Marsh started to get a headache, no one suspected she would be dead hours later.

Photos of the night show the young Auckland woman raising a toast with her best friends, showing off the platter of food she’d thoughtfully planned and created for the night.

Two hours after those photos were taken Gabby, as she was known, was lying on the floor of her home in agony, her mother Kathryn at her side and an ambulance on its way.

Later that night as Gabby lay hooked up to life support machines Auckland City Hospital staff delivered the heartbreaking news to her family – she had suffered a brain haemorrhage and was unlikely to survive.

The next day a decision was made. Gabby was to be taken off life support – but not until her organs had been donated.

And on Monday March 6, on her 20th birthday, after her family had said their goodbyes, Gabby was taken to surgery.

“The woman at the hospital called me and said it was all done, and the donation was taking place as we speak,” Kathryn Marsh told the NZ Herald.

“Gabby loved doing things for other people, and that was her biggest, most amazing gift.”

Gabby’s organs saved the lives of at least six people; her kidney, pancreas, lungs, liver and heart valves were all successfully donated.

“Of course, more than anything, we would love to have her here, but that’s not to be,” said Kathryn.

“But if anything good can come out of it, if she has helped people, then that’s comforting.”

Gabby was the eldest of three children and is survived by Jacob, 18 and 16-year-old Victoria.

Her death was the second tragedy for her family, her father Shayne died just 17 months ago after a long illness.

“It’s still not really sunken in, it was so sudden,” Kathryn said.

“Shayne was sick for 14 months and we all had time to get used to the idea, but with Gabby it was the complete opposite. It’s left us all a bit shell-shocked.”

Gabby was born and raised in Auckland, attending Mount Albert Grammar School before enrolling at Auckland University.

She was about to start her third year of a double degree in commerce and law when she died.

“She was a really good sister, she was kind, generous and she was like a second mum to me,” Jacob said.

Her family described her as extremely thoughtful and loving, adventurous, caring, a “rock star academic” and a young woman motivated and driven with a lot of energy.

“She had a killer smile that came easy and often,” her aunt Michelle Cliffe said.

Kathryn said she didn’t know where to begin when asked what was special about her eldest child.

“She just made people feel at ease and she was easy to be around. There was something special about Gabby,” she said.

After Shayne died, Gabby was a “phenomenal help” to Kathryn, stepping up to do her share of cooking, cleaning and helping with her siblings.

“She just got stuff done, she was pragmatic, hard working and so organised,” Michelle said.

The day Gabby died she woke early and went for a walk with Kathryn – something they did most days together.

Then the pair went to Newmarket shopping and Gabby helped her mother choose a new swimsuit for an extended family holiday to Fiji in April.

The family ate lunch together and Gabby went to watch her boyfriend Bradley play softball before returning home to prepare for her party.

She didn’t drink alcohol, but prepared pina colada cocktails for her three best friends, making a rum-free version for herself.

The girls had planned to go out in the city that night; Gabby loved old music so wanted to go dancing at Irish bar Danny Doolans.

Bradley was going to pick them up and drive them to town.

Then, Gabby started to complain about having a headache.

“It was getting worse and worse,” Kathryn said.

“She just wanted to lie down. Her friends left, they told her it was okay, that they would celebrate with her another time and they called Bradley to tell him.”

After the girls left, Gabby started throwing up and became agitated and slurring her words.

Kathryn suspected a severe migraine, and called an ambulance.

As the paramedics arrived – and Bradley – Gabby lost consciousness.

She never woke up.

Doctors have told her family they believe she had a arteriovenous malformation (AVM), a tangle of abnormal blood vessels connecting arteries and veins in the brain.

It is likely she was born with the condition and there was nothing her family could have done to detect or prevent her death.

“She was healthy, she exercised, she didn’t drink,” said Kathryn, shaking her head.

“The specialist said it was like a ticking time bomb,” Jacob added.

The family said the decision to donate Gabby’s organs was easy; they knew it was what she wanted as she specified it on her licence, and she was a generous young woman.

“She had such a bright future in front of her and I would have just loved to see her future unfold,” Kathryn said.

“We said goodbye to her and we knew that she was then going off to theatre – that she was the one giving the gifts on her birthday.

“She’s given life to more than six people on her birthday, that is her legacy.”

Jacob was brimming with pride over his sister’s final gift.

“It’s like she is living on in other people,” he said.

The Marsh family urged people to openly discuss organ donation with loved ones and make their wishes known.

They hoped to one day meet some of the people that Gabby’s organs helped.

The Gabby Marsh Scholarship

Gabby’s university friends have started a Givealittle page to fund a scholarship in her name, with the support of her family.

“Gabby was passionate, fun loving and kind. She smiled easily and often. She was selfless, considerate and generous.

She was someone who impacted everyone she met,” her friends said.

“Gabby changed the lives of so many around her, and we dream for her character and kindness to continue changing the life of others.

“To honour her academic ability, her exceptional character and her future cut tragically short, the Gabby Marsh Scholarship will be established and offered annually to enable a young school leaver demonstrating exceptional character and service to fulfil their dream of studying commerce at the University of Auckland.”

More than $20,000 has been donated so far.

To donate or read more, click here.

Thanks to the generosity of 503 deceased organ donors and their families a record 1,447 Australians were given a second chance at life in 2016. There were an additional 267 living donors, including 44 under the Australian Kidney Exchange Program.

To register on the Australian Organ Donor Register, click here.

www.goodgirlsgo.com

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Henry Sapiecha

Cystic Fibrosis sufferer and transplant patient Nardya Miller promotes organ donation in her final days of life

Tuesday, January 17th, 2017

A DYING Brisbane Qld Australia woman is using her final days to promote the importance of organ donation.

Last Wednesday, 25-year-old Nardya Miller was given a week to live. On Sunday she was submitted to palliative care.

Nardya Miller has been given just a week to live CYSTIC FIBROSIS-SUFFERER image www.newcures.info

The beauty salon owner has Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and her body is rejecting a double lung transplant she had over two years ago, the Sunshine Coast Daily reports.

Ms Miller’s fiance Liam Fitzgerald said it isn’t CF that is killing her, it is the chronic rejection she was diagnosed with three months ago.

“CF was a part of her life for 23 years and got her to needing a bilateral lung transplant but after the first 11 months post surgery, being so perfect, the lungs started to fail, over and over again requiring treatments she never thought she would have to go though.

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems image www.newcures.info

Nardya Miller started her own beauty business despite her ‘never-ending battle’ with medical problems.

“She went through rounds of plasmapheresis to try stop donor specific antibodies but nothing worked.”

Mr Fitzgerald said Ms Miller wants everyone to know how important organ donation is.

“The only way people will ever have a second chance at life is to be an organ donor.”

Ms Miller’s cousin Tachae Douglas-Miller said she underwent the lung transplant in 2014 because she was “sick of not being able to breathe and sick of fighting a never ending battle”.

“Although we hear stories on how new lungs had changed people lives, Nardya wasn’t so lucky.

“After undergoing the double lung transplant she didn’t realise she was so ill.”

But instead of letting her illness get the better of her, Ms Douglas-Miller said she started up her own beauty business and bought a house with Mr Fitzgerald, adopting three “beautiful little fur babies”.

“She started to make her dream of opening her own beauty store a reality (because) she didn’t want to stop working as she didn’t want to burden her fiance with debt.

“Unfortunately now, Nardya is losing the battle …(she) won’t be going home.”

Ms Douglas-Miller and her sister Ainsley Douglas-Miller started a Go Fund Me to help keep Ms Miller’s dreams of not leaving her fiance in debt, alive.

Already more than $15,000 has been raised by more than 400 people in six days, smashing the initial $10,000 target.

“We are overwhelmed by everyone’s generosity. I can’t thank everyone enough.”

Despite only having days to live, Ms Douglas-Miller said Ms Miller is still “witty, humorous and talkative”.

“Although we all know what the reality is.”

* If you wish to donate, the details are here.

www.ozrural.com.au

www.club-libido.com

www.goodgirlsgo.com

www.foodpassions.net

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Henry Sapiecha