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Archive for the ‘DISEASES’ Category

What is listeria and how to avoid it?

Thursday, March 1st, 2018

What is Listeria?

Listeria infection, also known as Listeriosis, is a rare but potentially severe illness caused by bacteria that infect humans and other warm-blooded animals.

It is caught most commonly through contaminated food.

How do you get the listeria infection?

Listeria is found in a plethora of environments and food items including:

  • Dirty water, irrigation water, soil and fertiliser
  • Cold chicken, deli meat, and pre-packaged meats
  • Raw and cold seafood including smoked salmon
  • Ice cream and unpasteurised milk products
  • Soft cheeses such as camembert and brie
  • Fresh fruit and bagged vegetables
  • Pre-prepared salads
  • Soy products such as tofu and tempeh

Lisa Szabo, CEO of Food Authority NSW, told SBS News that listeria infections happen most frequently through the food we eat, especially pre-packaged items.

“The bacteria are found very widely in our environment,” she said. “It’s present in the soil and it can be present in water. It can also be present in animals, whether it’s pets, cattle or sheep. So it’s not unexpected that it does find its way into food.”

Infection can also occur through contact with animals and pests, and insufficient cleaning of contaminated fruit and unclean hands.

Who is most at risk?

Listeria is uncommon in people with robust immune systems. Those most at risk include; pregnant women, infants, the elderly, people weakened by chronic illness and those taking immunity-impairing medications. Blood or spinal fluid samples are necessary for doctors to diagnose infection.

Listeria is not normally transmitted between people, although a pregnant woman can pass it onto her unborn baby through the placenta. Transmission can result in stillbirth or premature birth.

What does listeria do to the body?

Ms Szabo said listeria commonly presents as flu-like symptoms but infected patients have also presented with pneumonia and heart valve infections.

“People can have aches, pains, fever and chills. Some people can get nausea, and sometimes people will get diarrhoea,” she said.

“In very extreme cases people can get septicaemia and meningitis, and unfortunately, some people do die as a result of the more extreme forms.”

How to avoid getting it?

To avoid Listeria infection, Ms Szabo emphasised that people need to maintain good hygiene standards and be especially careful when buying and consuming fresh produce.

“We’re saying to people, particularly those who fall into those high-risk groups, not to purchase melons that have been bruised or damaged. That might be giving an indication that maybe organisms on the outside of the food have gotten into the middle,” she said.

“We also want to enforce basic hygiene messages: washing your hands before and after handling food; and making sure your cutting boards, dishes, utensils and countertops are washed and clean.”

Food Authority NSW and the Food Safety Information Council list the following simple measures: 

  • Avoid items past their ‘best before’ or ‘use by’ date
  • Refrigerate food items within two hours of slicing.
  • Cook foods thoroughly
  • Reheat food until it is steaming hot
  • Refrigerate leftovers promptly and use within 24 hours, or freeze
  • Ready to eat food should never be stored in the fridge for too long

RELATED STORIES

More than 70 cases of listeria were reported in 2017 and there have been 30 cases so far this year.

A listeria outbreak that resulted in the deaths of two people in New South Wales has sparked warnings from health authorities for Australians to throw out their rockmelons (also known as cantaloupe).

So far, ten elderly people across Australia have been diagnosed with listeria infection after eating rockmelons from the NSW Riverina region. The affected melons have been removed from sale.

How was the outbreak linked to rockmelons in Australia?

The latest Listeria outbreak has been linked to a rockmelon grower in the NSW town of Nericon, near Griffith, who volunteered to cease production last week after being notified of the outbreak.

Food Authority NSW has launched an investigation and CEO Lisa Szabo said her team is looking at a variety of contributing factors.

“It could be contaminated water, the type of fertilizer that was used, or that there was insufficient cleaning of the rockmelons prior to sale,” she said. “But if people are now seeing rockmelons on the shelves of supermarkets, they’re not rockmelons that have been implicated in this particular outbreak.”

Authorities have advised consumers to dispose of rockmelons in rubbish bins, not compost bins, if they are uncertain of the fruit’s origin.

Henry Sapiecha

Ten Herbs For Fibromyalgia

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018

Top 10 Herbs For Fibromyalgia
The body image shows the “the location of the nine paired tender points that comprise the 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia.”
(source – wikipedia)
Herbs background pic © Jag_cz – Fotolia.com

The challenge with fibromyalgia is that it is not only characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain but is also a syndrome that is accompanied by fatigue, sleeplessness, joint stiffness and even psychological conditions like depression and anxiety.

While the exact origin of this central nervous system disorder remains unknown, many clinical treatments involve therapeutic and pharmacologic interventions. However, these often have shortcomings. Therapies are usually ineffective with some clinical studies showing only short-term effectiveness or patients may have trouble complying with exercise based treatments. Pharmacological treatments on the other hand may pose extensive side effects. Which is why a 2011 survey reports that approximately 90% of arthritic patients employ alternative therapies like herbal medicines for common rheumatic conditions including fibromyalgia. Below are 10 herbal remedies regarded by many as beneficial for fibromyalgia.

10 Herbs for Fibromyalgia

Chamomile

With sleep difficulties and increasing anxiety frequently associated with fibromyalgia, the calming herb chamomile has been found to promote better sleep, reduce anxiety and even boost the immune system. [4] Scientists believe the dried flowers of chamomile contain terpenoids and flavonoids which contribute to its curative and preventive medicinal properties. [5] And because it is very mild, it is safe even for children and has a wide variety of applications aside from muscle spasm, rheumatic pain and fibromyalgia.

Valerian

hrb053

Like chamomile, valerian is also an herbal relaxant. When researchers in Germany studied whether bathing in water containing valerian oil have an effect on pain, sleeplessness and tender point count, out-patients with generalized fibromyalgia reported significant improvements in their well-being and sleep while tender point count also decreased significantly.

St. John’s Wort

While no specific study has claimed St. John’s Wort success in treating fibromyalgia, several researches have shown St. John’s Wort as more effective than placebo in treating depression that commonly accompanies fibromyalgia. Other sources show that this herb can be as effective as antidepressants like Prozac in alleviating mild depression – however claims of no side effects should be met with caution as St. John’s wort does have the potential for side effects and can can cause adverse reactions if combined with several prescription medications.

Ginko Biloba

In 2002, British scientists conducted an open, uncontrolled study to evaluate the effects of coenzyme 10 combined with Ginko biloba extract in volunteer subjects with clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia syndrome. After participants orally received 200 mg of Ginko extracts everyday for 84 days, improvement in quality of life was gradually observed throughout the duration of the study, with a significant difference noted compared when the study first began. This, together with only minor side effects, proves to be promising for more controlled studies in the future.

Cayenne

Red hot chili pepper isolated on white

Studies suggest cayenne to be a versatile herb targetting pain from anywhere in the head like migraine or tension headaches down to body muscle pain. Clinical trials using various topical preparations of cayenne found evidence of their effectiveness in reducing low back pain compared to a placebo.

Red Clover

Known for its ability to boost the immune system of the body as well as in providing ample amount of energy, red clover is considered as one of the best natural solutions to fibromyalgia. This herb is actually a good source of Vitamins B and C which normally lack in people diagnosed with fibromyalgia. [10]

When made into tea, red clover, together with dandelion and burdock root, aids in cleansing the bloodstream. It also helps in relieving different symptoms of fibromyalgia like poor mental function, intestinal issues, restless sleep, stiffness of the joints and joint pain. [11]

Passionflower

This potent herb has sometimes been included in natural treatments for fibromyalgia because of its ability to relieve common symptoms of fibromyalgia which include tension, nervousness, fatigue, sleep disturbances and anxiety.

Ginseng

Considered as one of the oldest herbs that aid in treating fibromyalgia, ginseng is a very potent herb that is known for its anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties that help people suffering from this condition. It also helps in stimulating the body’s immune system against viral and bacterial infections.

Regular intake of ginseng actually helps in cleansing the body as well as in stimulating the proper functioning of the organs. It gradually eliminates the discomforts caused by fibromyalgia, and through time, all symptoms are relieved. Ginseng also works by restoring the energy lost during the attack of fibromyalgia.

Griffonia Simplicifolia

Though less commonly known, griffonia simplicifolia is a powerful herb that can be used in eliminating the debilitating symptoms of fibromyalgia. The herb actually contains high levels of 5- HTP which is considered as an effective natural pain killer. Griffonia Simplicifolia primarily functions by alleviating the pain associated with fibromyalgia. Also, its natural ability in bringing relaxation and calmness to the muscles to help deal with the symptoms of fibromyalgia.

Kava kava

Well known for its ability to ward off anxiety and nervousness, kava kava is a very potent herb that can be used to treat several symptoms of fibromyalgia. It actually helps in relieving nervous tension that is associated with conditions characterized by muscle spasms, like fibromyalgia.

The use of kava kava is believed to be effective in reducing mental stress while enhancing mental capacities. It also relaxes striated muscles thereby permitting more blood to flow into the brain. In effect, patients are capable of  thinking clearly and properly.

Because no widely accepted cure for fibromyalgia exists, treatment is usually simply focused in relieving the symptoms. Consequently, the growing popularity of using alternative remedies like herbs especially by those who suffer chronic fibromyalgia necessitates further studies on their effectiveness and the mechanisms involved behind them.

Henry Sapiecha

www.sunblestproducts.com

Herbs For Fibromyalgia – References:

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibromyalgia

[2] Complementary and alternative therapies for fibromyalgia. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11286671

[3] Herbal medicine in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21220089

[4] http://www.fibromyalgiahope.com/fibromyalgia-herbs.html

[5] Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21132119

[6] Medicinal baths for treatment of generalized fibromyalgia. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=valerian%2C+fibromyalgia

[7] http://www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/guide/fibromyalgia-herbs-and-supplements

[8] An open, pilot study to evaluate the potential benefits of coenzyme Q10 combined with Ginkgo biloba extract in fibromyalgia syndrome. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12025528

[9] Herbal medicine for low back pain: a Cochrane review. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17202897

[10] http://ic.steadyhealth.com/fibromyalgia_herbs.html

[11] http://www.herbal-treatment-remedies.com/red-clover-tea.html

[12] http://ic.steadyhealth.com/fibromyalgia_herbs.html

[13] http://www.ilhwakoreanginseng.com/ginseng_for_fibromyalgia.html

[14] http://ic.steadyhealth.com/fibromyalgia_herbs.html

[15] http://www.healthy.co.nz/ailment/2055-kava-kava-nervous-system-relaxant.html

[16] http://www.naturopathic-physician.com/index.php?page=28

Young boy has his seizures cured with cannabis oil-The family story here.

Monday, February 19th, 2018

This is Sam. He’s my son. His epilepsy caused him to have up to 100 seizures a day. After seven years we were out of options. Our last hope: an untested, unproven treatment. The only problem? It was illegal.

www.druglinks.info

The hospital pharmacist slid three bottles of pills across the counter, gave my wife a form to sign, and reminded her that this was not the corner drugstore. The pharmacy knew how many pills had been dispensed, he said; it would know how many had been consumed; and it would expect her to return the unused pills before she left the country. The pharmacist made it clear that he was not only in touch with our doctor but with the company supplying the medication. They would know if she broke the rules. MORE

There are products here below that may help you

Henry Sapiecha

www.druglinks.info

Man dies from extremely rare infectious disease. QLD Australia.

Friday, February 9th, 2018

A YOUNG Queensland man has died after contracting diphtheria. A highly contagious illness that rarely occurs in Australia.

The man, 27, from Cairns, was flown to the Prince Charles Hospital in Brisbane on January 24.

Cairns and Hinterland Hospital and Health Service confirmed on Thursday the man had died.

Diphtheria is caused by a bacterium, Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The actual disease is caused when the bacteria release a toxin, or poison, into a person’s body. Diphtheria bacteria live in the mouth, throat, and nose of an infected person and can be passed to other persons by coughing or sneezing.

 

 

Health officials last month were at a loss as to how the man contracted the contagious and potentially life-threatening illness.

A Department of Health spokeswoman said the man hadn’t done any recent international travel.

It is understood he wasn’t vaccinated against diphtheria, and health officials have stressed the importance of being immunised.

Qld Australia.Brisbane mothers line up to have their children immunised against diphtheria in 1941.

Diphtheria is a very contagious and potentially deadly infection caused by a toxin (poison) produced by bacteria.

There are four different types of diphtheria:

1…• Classical respiratory diphtheria

2…• Laryngeal diphtheria

3…• Nasal diphtheria and

4…• Cutaneous diphtheria (skin lesions).

It is not known what type the Queensland patient is suffering from.

Symptoms generally begin two to five days after exposure to the bacteria but at times can appear up to 10 days after exposure. Symptoms will depend on the type of diphtheria infection. Experts say symptoms range from sore throats and mucus, to ulcers on limbs. Diphtheria results primarily in swelling in the nose, throat and windpipe, which can cause breathing difficulties.

It is spread by direct contact with an infected person, or through contaminated objects. Some pics below

“Bull neck” appearance of diphtheritic cervical lymphadenopathy

10-year-old child unfortunately has severe diphtheria

This child has “bullneck diphtheria”

Pharyngeal diphtheria and membranes covering the tonsils and uvula

Diphtheria pneumonia (hemorrhagic) and bronchiolar membranes

A huge diphtheria skin lesion on the leg

Close-up image of a diphtheria skin lesion

Diphtheria skin lesion on a mans neck

 Indonesian child with diphtheria kept alive via a throat operation

Can diphtheria be treated?
Doctors achieve this by initially giving small doses of the antitoxin and then gradually increasing the dosage. Antibiotics. Diphtheria is also treated with antibiotics, such as penicillin or erythromycin. Antibiotics help kill bacteria in the body, clearing up infections.Dec 8, 2016

The Department of Health members urgently tried to find locals that may have come into contact with the man after he contracted the illness.

Henry Sapiecha

THIS WOMAN SAYS SHE CURED HER CERVICAL CANCER WITH CANNABIS OIL

Sunday, February 4th, 2018

 

Shona Leigh said she had second stage cervical cancer cured in eight months using oil supplied freely.

MORE HERE

Henry Sapiecha

 

 

The Tropical Fruit Mangosteen has been found deadly to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

Great news for mangosteen lovers and those following the quest to find novel anti-cancer medicines derived from plants! We just received this report from our friends over at The Eden Prescription: In a new study published in Molecular Cancer (an open-access, peer-reviewed journal) alpha-mangostin, a substance derived from mangosteen pericarp, was proven to kill up to 99% of human breast cancer cells in vitro.*

What was particularly interesting about this study was that the researchers gained a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action of the mangosteen-derived substance. Alpha-mangostin was reported to block Fatty Acid Synthase – which supposedly disrupts the cancer cells’ ability to make fatty acids – without which they die.

It appears that numerous cancer cell types require Fatty Acid Synthase for their survival, which may be the reason why mangostin has received much attention recently; it has also been found deadly also to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) is an amazing, delicious tropical fruit – one of my favorites in fact – and was originally native to Thailand. Don’t be fooled by the name, it does not look or taste like a mango. Mangosteen has a thick, pithy casing (pericarp) which is easily broken or cut open to reveal the white, fleshy part inside that is eaten. Mangosteen is also considered potentially valuable with weight loss, inflammation, heart disease and diabetes! However it is the pericarp that may have the strongest medicinal qualities. For centuries, people in Southeast Asia have used dried mangosteen pericarp as antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antipyretic, analgesic, and as a treatment for rashes. [2]

Tests like the study mentioned are the first step in the development and study of new medicines. It’s a long way before we can say for certain that mangosteen will have a direct anti-cancer action in humans – and in this study the beneficial substance was in the pericarp (the pithy case). However there have now been several promising studies on mangosteen extracts – including a 2013 study in which alpha-mangostin significantly suppressed tumor growth and reduced lymph node metastasis in mammary cancer in mice; leading researchers to conclude that “Mangosteen extracts appear to, in fact, have chemopreventive qualities and might prove useful as adjunctive and/or complementary alternative treatments in human breast cancer.” [2]

Mangosteen pericarp is available in supplement form.

* “In vitro” (literally “in glass”) is a scientific term used to denote that the test was done on isolated cell cultures in laboratory glassware, as opposed to in living creatures (“In vivo”).

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

HUGE LIST OF HERBS USED FOR DISEASE TREATMENTS CURES & BENEFITS-SHARE

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This information has been supplied by herbs-info.com

List Of Herbs

On this page you will find our alphabetical list of 150+ 189 herbs! Every herb in our list has its own dedicated page on this site – with pictures and very detailed info! Follow the links to learn more about each herb. The goal of the individual herbs’ pages is to gather information about the plant in one place, so that anyone researching it can have quick access to information.

Please bookmark this page so that you can use it as a “quick lookup” when you want to learn all about a herb. You can also share our image on Facebook and Pinterest. Each herb page follows a similar format – starting with names for the herb in different languages, then giving background and history, common and traditional uses of the herb, scientific research, esoteric uses and safety notes.

Our method of organization intentionally follows the style of the old herbals, which listed the plants in alphabetical order and often compiled the writings of other herbalists from past times. There is much material to work through and so this list is continuing to expand. Ok, here is the list!

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The Herbs:There are many more to yet come.

Agrimony | Ajwain | Alfalfa | Alkanet | Allspice | Aloe Vera | Althaea Officinalis (Marsh Mallow) | Amla | Angelica | Angostura | Anise | Arabian Jasmine | Arnica | Arrach | Artemisia | Asafoetida | Ashwagandha | Bacopa Monnieri | Bashful Mimosa | Basil | Bay Laurel | Bean | Bears Breech | Belladonna | Benzoin | Bergamot | Betony | Bilberry | Bitter Melon | Black Pepper | Blackberry Bush | Blumea Camphor | Boneset | Borage | Brooklime | Bryony | Bugle | Burdock | Butterbur | Cacao | Cajeput | Calendula | Canella | Capers | Cardamom | Carob Tree | Cascara Sagrada | Cascarilla | Catechu | Catnip | Cat’s Whiskers | Catsfoot | Cayenne | Cedron | Celery | Centory | Chamomile | Cheken | Chervil | Chinese Honeysuckle | Chives | Cilantro | Cinnamon | Clavo Huasca | Clove | Coltsfoot | Comfrey | Contrayerba | Copal | Cordyceps | Cumin | Daffodil | Damiana | Dandelion | Deadly Nightshade | Dill | Dittany Of Crete | Dodder | Dragon’s Blood | Echinacea | Elder | Epazote | Female Peony | Fennel | Fenugreek | Feverfew | Five Leaved Chaste Tree | Flax | Frankincense | Galangal | Garlic | Gentian | Ginger | Gingko Biloba | Ginseng | Goat’s Rue | Goji | Golden Seal | Gotu Kola | Green Tea | Guarana | Guava | Hearts Ease | Heavenly Elixir | Hedge Nettle | Henna | Hibiscus | Hollyhocks | Holy Basil | Holy Basil | Honeysuckle | Hops | Horny Goat Weed | Horseradish | Horsetail | Hyacinth | Indian Laurel | Jew’s Mallow | Juniper | Kava | Ladies Mantle | Lady’s Thistle | Lavender | Lead Tree | Lemon Balm | Lemongrass | Lesser Calamint | Licorice | Lily of the Valley | Male Satyrion | Marjoram | Milk Thistle | Moringa | Mountain Apple | Mugwort | Mullein | Neem | Nelumbo Nucifera | Nutmeg | Nymphaea Caerulea | Onion | Oregano | Orris Root | Paprika | Parsley | Passion Flower | Patchouli | Pepper Elder | Pimiento Pepper | Plantain | Primrose | Queen’s Flower | Red Clover | Reishi | Rhubarb | Ringworm Bush | Rooibos | Rosemary | Rue | Saffron | Sage | Savory | Saw Palmetto | Seaweed | Senna | Slippery Elm | Snake Needle Grass | Snakeweed | Soapnuts | Solomon’s Seal | Spearmint | Spiny Sapindus | St. John’s Wort | St Thomas Bean | Star Anise | Starfruit | Stinging Nettle | Sumac | Sweetsop | Tamarind | Tarragon | Tea | Thyme | Turmeric | Uva-Ursi | Valerian | Vanilla | Vervain | Water Hyssop | Wild Oregano | Wild Tea | Witch Hazel | Yarrow | Yerba Mate |

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Substance In Ginger Found 10,000x As Effective as Chemo Against Breast Cancer Stem Cells

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

An intriguing and possibly highly important study [1] has recently been published regarding the action of 6-shogaol (a ginger compound) against cancer cells. This study has been “doing the rounds” on social media but in many cases it has been misreported and highly misrepresented – either through misunderstanding of the (admittedly a little complex) science involved – or through deliberate exaggeration of the facts in order to create “headline sizzle”. Many of the social media articles we saw did not even link to the original research!

We’re going to do our best to clear it all up for you today, “joining the dots” with some of the other amazing research that is being done in this field and attempting to interpret the studies in terms that both make sense to the lay person and won’t offend persons of science.

Short Summary:

The quick takeaway for those in a hurry: 6-shogaol, a compound in ginger, has been found to have amazing activity against breast cancer cells in cell cultures in the lab – including action against simulations of “stem cells” – the “mother ship” of cancer cells that chemo showed no activity against even at 10,000x concentration. The action of 6-Shogaol against the cancer cells happens at concentrations that do very little harm to healthy cells. Other studies have shown that these ginger compounds are bio-absorbed but are converted into other forms in the body, leaving some uncertainty as to whether these new forms are as active, more active or less active against actual cancer. Recent research however has found a strong possibility that ginger may have an actual anti-cancer action in vivo, leading us to conclude that ginger should be considered a prime candidate for inclusion in an “anti-cancer diet” (subject to approval from your physician of course! We have to say this; we do not make actual medicinal recommendations for legal reasons.)

Ginger Compound vs. Chemotherapy (Taxol):

In this in vitro study, 6-Shogaol showed astonishing activity against “spheroids” – stem cell-like simulations – against which taxol (standard chemotherapy treatment derived from yew tree) showed no activity at even 10,000x the concentration. [1] The inability of taxol to kill the stem cells has been a past stumbling block of cancer therapy. 6-shogaol was found “only” 2 to 5 times as active than taxol against the “regular” breast cancer cells (still an impressive result).

What’s really awesome is that 6-shogaol showed high selectivity – and normal (non-cancerous) cells showed strong resistance to it even after 6 days. 6-shogaol was effective in killing both breast cancer monolayer cells and spheroids at doses that were not toxic to noncancerous cells. [1]

This study adds to the impressive list of studies in which ginger compounds have been found highly active against cancer cells in vitro while also showing very high selectivity, not harming normal / healthy cells.

However what remains to be fully understood (this is an essential point) is the bioavailability of 6-shogaol after digestion. In other words, an in vitro study such as this does not indicate whether or not eating ginger will do you any good, because if 6-shogaol is broken down by stomach acids, it is unlikely to reach its intended site anyway. Even if it does make it into the bloodstream – how will it “get inside” the cancer? The “metabolic fate” of compounds which destroy cancer cells in in vitro studies are often overlooked by the casual researcher (and the numerous social media outlets reporting on such matters) – and so the “first step” in your education on this matter should be to understand that an in vitro study such as this cannot be considered as evidence in any way that the nutrient will have an effect on cancer.

That said, it might. We did a little research…

Ginger Phytochemistry:

The chemical constituents of ginger (and ginger supplements) have been known for some years [2][3]. 6-shogaol is one of the 4 main pungent constituents of ginger [4] (the others are 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol and 10-gingerol. Shogaols are chemically similar to gingerols – being the dehydrated form thereof. Interestingly, Shogaols are found in only small quantities in the fresh root and are mainly found in the dried and thermally treated roots; with 6-shogaol becoming the most abundant of these constituents when ginger is dried or cooked. [5] There are smaller amounts of other gingerols, shogaols and many further compounds in ginger; these are largely untested but may contribute significantly to the health benefits of the whole root.

Bioavailability Of 6-Shogaol:

As it happens, a 2010 study has investigated the bioavailability of 6-shogaol. [4] Their notes reported first of all that prior to that study, few studies had examined the bioavailability of 6-Shogaol. They stated: “Despite ginger being investigated in over 30 clinical trials in humans with over 2300 subjects, only a handful of studies in rats and our study in healthy volunteers have examined the absorption, bioavailability, metabolites and elimination of ginger constituents. In rat studies, only two of the pungent

compounds, 6-gingerol and zingerone, have been investigated, and in two of the rat studies 6-gingerol was administered as an intravenous bolus, which is unlikely to be reflective of usual oral dosing. Moreover, until we conducted a study in healthy volunteers no pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted in humans nor had any studies in mammals or in vitro examined the other major pungent constituents, namely 8- and 10-gingerols and 6-shogaols.” [4]

A further study from the same team studied 6-shogoal in a clinical trial to determine whether it is passed to the bloodstream intact. [6] It was found that 6-shogoal is absorbed by the body after oral dosing but is bio-converted (either in the liver or intestinal mucosa, researchers were not sure) to glucuronide conjugates – which can be detected in serum for a few hours after ingestion; before being eliminated by the body’s natural processes.

The researchers summarized succinctly here: “In [previous] study, 6-shogaol [had been] found to induce apoptosis, autophagocytosis and growth inhibition in ovarian cancer cells at 2.21 μg/mL (7.5 μmol/L). All of these in vitro studies required higher concentrations of free ginger constituents than found in the serum in this study – putting the clinical validity of these and similar studies in question. However, gingerols and shogaols may reach higher serum concentrations within target tissue compared to serum, e.g., gut. Ginger conjugates may also be as or more biologically active compared to parent compound. Clearly, further research is needed to answer these questions and determine the cancer prevention relevance of ginger.”

Action Of Ginger Compounds Against Cancer In Vivo:

This research appears to be underway and we are getting closer to a positive result: A further study from the esteemed Oxford University Press, published in Carcinogenesis (2014) [7], has found astonishing synergistic results for the anti-cancer use of whole ginger extract in vivo against human prostate cancer cell lines – demonstrating that ginger extract “showed 2.4-fold higher tumor growth-inhibitory efficacy than” isolated constituents. In addition, gingerol glucuronides were detected in feces upon intravenous administration confirming hepatobiliary elimination. [7]

This important result from a prestigious journal is a “double-win” for herbalism – being not only highly indicative that ginger metabolites may possibly be bioactive against cancer cells in the human body, but also demonstrating the importance of preserving the natural composition of whole extracts.

We await further study with anticipation! In the meantime, ginger is generally recognized as a healthy, safe addition to the diet and one noted by innumerable studies for its health benefits and potential for protection against disease. I believe that those considering an “anti cancer diet” should (with the advice of their physician) hold ginger in high esteem in both raw and dried/cooked form.

The message here is clear: Nature works best when not tampered with – and it makes sense. After all, we did evolve over hundreds of thousands of years in a pure natural environment. Researchers are starting to catch up to what herbalists have known all along – that we are bioattuned to nature and literally “designed by evolution” to thrive on food in the most natural state possible.

Finally – if you happen to chance upon headlines “ginger 10000x as effective as chemo”… now you know the actual facts…

.

Further reading:

Our full “Herbal Report” on ginger.

10 Amazing Health Benefits Of Ginger

Scientists Find Substance In Ginger Kills 91% of Leukemia Cells and Shrinks Tumors in Vivo

References:

[1] 6-Shogaol Inhibits Breast Cancer Cells and Stem Cell-Like Spheroids by Modulation of Notch Signaling Pathway and Induction of Autophagic Cell Death. PLOSone (Sept 2014). http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0137614 (Full Text)

[2] Fresh organically grown ginger (Zingiber officinale): composition and effects on LPS-induced PGE2 production. Phytochemistry (2004). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15280001

[3] Identification and Quantification of Gingerols and Related Compounds in Ginger Dietary Supplements Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry. J Agric Food Chem (2010). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2783668/ (Full Text)

[4] Quantitation of 6-, 8- and 10-Gingerols and 6-Shogaol in Human Plasma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection. Int J Biomed Sci. (2010). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2975369/

[5] 6-Shogaol https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shogaol

[6] Pharmacokinetics of 6-, 8-, 10-Gingerols and 6-Shogaol and Conjugate Metabolites in Healthy Human Subjects. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers (2009) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2676573/ (Full Text)

[7] Enterohepatic recirculation of bioactive ginger phytochemicals is associated with enhanced tumor growth-inhibitory activity of ginger extract. Carcinogenesis (2014). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24431413

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

10 cancer symptoms you should look out for & do not ignore them

Sunday, November 12th, 2017

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Most of us think we know the telltale signs of cancer: a lump in the breast, unexplainable tiredness, sudden weight loss… but experts are pointing to lesser known symptoms to watch out for that may lead to earlier detection of the disease.

Professor of medical oncology at Southampton University and lead clinician for Cancer Research UK, Peter Johnson says many early signals are “vague and non-specific”.

“It’s these that people need to be aware of and report to their doctors. But we’re not good at paying attention to our own bodies, to what’s normal for us, so we ignore minor symptoms which occasionally can be caused by early cancer,” he told The Telegraph.

Clinical oncologist Dr David Bloomfield says in most cases catching the disease in its early stages ensures a cure.

He says it’s important to not only be aware of the symptoms noted below, but if something else appears unusual and doesn’t go away in a couple of weeks, get it checked out.

Here are 10 symptoms to note that could lead to early cancer detection:
1. A hoarse or croaky voice

This can be a common component of a cold, but if it persists it should be checked out. The symptom can indicate “an early, curable head or neck cancer such as one of the vocal cords,” says Dr Bloomfield.

2. Heavy night sweats

While the summer heat or the onset of menopause in women could more than likely be the cause of night sweats, it’s a symptom that could also be a sign of lymphoma.

Dr Shankara Paneesha, consultant haematologist in Birmingham, told The Telegraph: “People with lymphoma have high metabolisms because lymphoma cells use a lot of energy, so they get severe, drenching night sweats where they need to change their pyjamas and sometimes the bedding.”

3. Persistent heartburn

For many, heartburn is a common issue following a particularly spicy or fatty meal. But if your heartburn lasts more than two to three weeks and requires regular antacid medication it could signal stomach or oesophageal cancer.

Occasionally it can be linked to ovarian or pancreatic cancer.

4. Middle back pain

For the vast majority, back pain is due to a musculoskeletal issue. But for some it can be a symptom of pancreatic cancer.

Pippa Corrie, consultant and associate lecturer in medical oncology at Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust says there is a particular sign to note:

“The classic symptom is pain in the upper abdomen that spreads out across the back,” she says.

Situated at the back of the abdomen, as the pancreas grows, it begins to invade nerves which signal back pain.

“While most musculoskeletal back pain will occur in the lower back, that associated with pancreatic cancer is about a hand’s breadth above that and may also come with other symptoms, such as people being off their food, tiredness and weight loss.”

5. Post-menopausal bleeding

This can be a sign of endometrial cancer. Dr Bloomfield says any kind of post-menopausal bleeding should be checked with your GP.

Endometrial cancer is also associated with being overweight.

6. Trouble urinating

As men age, the prostate gland grows. This can increase the need to urinate, especially at night.

Difficulty passing urine or needing to go more frequently could indicate prostate cancer.

7. Finding it hard to swallow

Trouble swallowing can be an indication of a stroke or brain but occasionally it can be an early symptom of a head and neck cancer such as of the vocal cords, oesophagus, mouth or tongue.

Most commonly found in those who smoke and drink regularly, other symptoms can include pain at the back of the mouth.

8. Changes in stools

Blood in faeces is a commonly known indication of bowel cancer. But it’s also important to note any sudden changes in colour, frequency and pain.

In rare cases it can also be an indicator of ovarian or pancreatic cancer.

9. A persistent sore

Changes to moles including itching and bleeding are commonly known as symptoms of skin cancer. Other symptoms include small lumps on the skin that continue to grow, and some cases produce an ulcer that won’t heal.

10. Mouth ulcers

The majority of mouth ulcers are from a viral infection, will clear up in three to four days and are notably painful.

An ulcer in the mouth or on the tongue which lasts for three to four weeks and may or may not be painful could indicate cancer.

Also look for white marks on the tongue or thick, white patches. These need to be checked by your GP as they indicate changes to the mouth’s lining which could lead to cancer.

Henry Sapiecha

Scientists ‘can’t explain’ Black Death plague outbreak

Monday, October 30th, 2017

An image of the Ebola virus under a microscope.

PLAGUE warnings were being issued for nine countries in south-east Africa this week, as authorities rushed to contain an outbreak of Black Death.

It’s the same virus that led to one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, killing an estimated 25 million people in Medieval Europe.

The recent outbreak is believed to have started in Madagascar, an island nation off the African coast, and at least 1300 people have been infected.

It’s a serious bacterial infection transmitted by fleas, and can be easily treated with antibiotics, but so far 124 have been reported dead.

“Plague, though terrifying, is nothing new in Madagascar, where about 600 cases are reported annually,” the World Health Organisation said on its website.

However, WHO officials warned there is “something different” about this outbreak, and “health officials couldn’t explain it”.

“Plague is a disease of poverty, because it thrives in places with poor sanitary conditions and health services,” said Dr Arthur Rakotonjanabelo.

However, he said the plague had spread to new parts of the country, which hadn’t seen the plague since at least 1950.

SO WHEN WILL THE NEXT OUTBREAK BE?

Scientists have known about it since 1976, but it took the world by surprise three years ago.

Global health authorities are constantly trying to predict the next outbreak – bacterial or viral – so it can be stopped before it becomes an epidemic or pandemic.

The Global Virome Project, which was proposed in 2016 and is just beginning to take shape, is one ambitious initiative which aims to find all viruses in birds and mammals that could spill over to humans in the next decade.

Meanwhile, the US Agency for International Development has spent the past eight years cataloguing threats, identifying 1000 new viruses.

However, experts estimate 99.9 per cent of viruses are still unknown.

A new Australian study, published this week by Jemma Geoghegan from Macquarie University and Edward Holmes from the University of Sydney, argued it’s impossible to predict a global outbreak because there are too many variables.

They said efforts will fail because the enormous number of unknown viruses could evolve and appear in humans at any time.

“The [Global Virome Project] will be great for understanding more about viruses and their evolution, but I don’t see how it’ll help us work out what’s going to infect us,” Dr Geoghegan told The Atlantic‘s Ed Yong.

“We’re only just coming to terms with the vastness of the virosphere.”

Once a virus achieves human-to-human transmission, it’s really just a matter of luck as to how severe and contagious it is, and whether or not it can be treated quickly.

EVOLUTION CAN BE GREAT, AND TERRIBLE

Scientists are always trying to identify the next threat before it reaches epidemic or pandemic proportions

Both humans and diseases are constantly changing, so it’s a bit like trying to hit a moving target from a moving car.

“We’re trying to predict really, really rare events from not much information, which I think is going to fail,” Dr Geoghegan said – and history agrees.

For example, scientists discovered the Zika virus in Uganda way back in 1947, and yet there was an outbreak on the other side of the world, in Brazil, two years ago.

The disease is spread by mosquitoes, and can cause severe birth defects in babies if the mother is bitten while pregnant.

Similarly, the Ebola virus was discovered in 1976 in South Sudan, but it claimed a reported 11,315 lives in west Africa three years ago.

It is highly infectious and spreads through transmission of bodily fluids, causing a gruesome death as the whole body haemorrhages.

Still other diseases emerge totally out of the blue.

One example is the SARS virus – a severe form of pneumonia – which broke out in China after a researcher accidentally caught it in a lab in 2002.

Another is HIV, a sexually transmitted virus which attacks the body’s immune system, which has claimed an estimated 35 million lives in the past 40 years.

Probably the most famous of all is the Spanish Influenza pandemic, which killed up to 100 million people – or five per cent of the world’s population – in 1918.

The other variable is changes to possible treatments – which vary widely depending if the outbreak is bacterial or viral.

Vaccines are undoubtedly the best way to treat viruses, because they require living hosts to multiply and can only really be fought off by the body’s own immune system, but they are a prevention and not a cure.

Bacteria, on the other hand, can be effectively treated with antibiotics – however, health experts warn an “antibiotic apocalypse” is fast approaching, as overuse of drugs like Penicillin lead to a significant increase in drug-resistant infections.

DOES SCIENCE HAVE A WAY FORWARD?

Dr Geoghegan thinks the best way forward is to focus just on the “fault lines”.

The Atlantic reports that means regions where people are more likely to be exposed to animal viruses because they are chopping down forests, setting up dense animal markets, hunting wild creatures for meat, or moving around a lot because of political instability.

However, others argue global scientific efforts shouldn’t be so readily dismissed.

Professor Jonna Mazet, global director for PREDICT, a European Union organisation that aims to prepare for the “domino effect” in crisis situations, told Ed Yong it’s too early to know how things will pan out.

She said if the same complaints had been made about meteorology a century ago, “we wouldn’t have created the data that lets us forecast the weather, which we can do pretty well now”.

Henry Sapiecha