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Archive for the ‘MENTAL CONDITIONS’ Category

13 Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder: Are You Bipolar?

Monday, August 18th, 2014

Bipolar Disorder is a mood disorder that affects many people every day. According to medical professionals, people who suffer from this mood disorder experience episodes of mania, often followed by episodes of depression and vice versa.

The most common symptom associated with bipolar disorder is sudden mood swings. Individuals who are bipolar will experience heightened euphoria and happiness followed by drastic depression and guilt. While mood swings are the most common symptom, they are not the only symptom. There are several other symptoms associated with this condition and many of them contradict each other. Essentially, there are two types of symptoms: manic symptoms and depressive symptoms. Each set of symptoms produce very different types of behavior and are often experienced back to back in a short period of time.

Below you will find a list of bipolar symptoms from various medical sources as well as the type (manic or depressive or both) associated with each:

1. Mood Swings

Type: Manic and Depressive

Mood swings are the most common symptom of bipolar disorder and are a combination of the manic and depressive symptoms. A mood swing is characterized by high levels of positivity followed by high levels of negativity and depression or vice versa.

two faces of bipolar womans image www.newcures.info

2. Euphoria 

Type: Manic

A manic episode will present symptoms of euphoria in patients. Sufferers experience a heightened level of happiness and a sense of accomplishment.

man in suit on chair is happy image www.newcures.info

3. Rapid Speech

Type: Manic

A good indication that someone is experiencing a manic episode is rapid speech. Patients will suddenly begin speaking extremely quickly for long periods of time.

man moving fast with phone in hand image www.newcures.info

4. Racing Thoughts

Type: Manic

Racing thoughts are a common manic bipolar symptom. Individuals will often have a difficult time focusing on one thing and will tend to over-analyze their thoughts.

racing thoughts with confused man image www.newcures.info

5. Irritation

Type: Manic and Depressive

Irritation and agitation are common in both manic and depressive episodes. Sufferers are easily irritated by situations they normally wouldn’t be agitated with.

irritable girl with hands on head image www.newcures.info

6. Increased Physical Activity

Type: Manic

When a person is experiencing a manic episode they will often have extremely high levels of energy. To help relieve the energy, sufferers often turn to physical activity. If someone suddenly feels the need to exercise excessively to exert energy, it may be an indication of an underlying problem.

guy working out in gym image www.newcures.info

7. Careless Use of Drugs/Alcohol

Type: Manic

Sometimes, people suffering from bipolar disorder will turn to drugs and alcohol. Careless use of these substances may be a warning sign of deeper issues.

alcoholic man shadow image www.newcures.info

8. Decreased Need for Sleep

Type: Manic

As previously noted, manic episodes often involve large bursts of energy and euphoria. These symptoms can make it incredibly difficult to sleep. An individual experiencing this symptom may require less sleep, but won’t necessarily feel tired or exhausted.

girl in pink waking up in bed image www.newcures.info

9. Missed Work 

Type: Manic and Depressive

A common symptom of bipolar disorder is the inability to maintain a schedule. For this reason, many bipolar sufferers will often miss work (or school or other commitments).

woman in bed taking a sickie image www.newcures.info

10. Fatigue

Type: Depressive

Contrary to manic symptoms, individuals suffering from a depressive episode will often experience extreme tiredness and fatigue. Wanting to go to bed, staying in bed late, and an overall lack of motivation throughout the day are all signs of bipolar disorder.

man at laptop with concrete block on head image www.newcures.info

11. Chronic Pain with No Known Cause

Type: Depressive

Individuals experiencing other symptoms on the list, along with chronic pain with no known cause, may be suffering from bipolar disorder. This pain can present itself throughout many parts of the body including, but not limited to, severe headaches.

woman with hands on head in pain image www.newcures.info

12. Sadness/Hopelessness

Type: Depressive

One of the most telltale symptoms of a depressive episode associated with bipolar disorder is an overwhelming feeling of sadness and hopelessness. Individuals can fall into a state of depression and may have noticeably different symptoms than those related to a manic episode (where individuals experience a heightened sense of happiness and euphoria).

woman crouched in despair image www.newcures.info

13. Suicidal Thoughts

Type: Depressive

As noted in slide 12, individuals with bipolar disorder will often feel sad and depressed. In extreme cases, they may develop suicidal thoughts and act in a suicidal manner. If these symptoms present themselves, seek medical or professional attention immediately.

drug overdose image www.newcures.info

Henry Sapiecha

 

 

 

 

MORE RESAERCH NEEDED INTO METAL HEALTH PROBLEMS WITH MINE WORKERS

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

ARE COAL MINE WORKERS BECOMING MENTALLY CHALLENGED?

Researchers at the University of Newcastle Australia are examining the extent and impact of mental health problems in the coal mining industry.
Tri Nature - Environmentally Responsible Household Products

They will work with the Minerals Council and the Hunter Institute of Mental Health to identify the mental health problems of coal industry employees and the impact on workplace safety and productivity.

Mental health problems are estimated to cost the NSW state’s coal mines around $430 million in productivity losses every year.

The University’s Professor Brian Kelly says researchers will also develop a mental health prevention model.

“To put in place a program of work looking at the prevention of mental health problems , the promotion of good mental health in the workplace and ways that people can get effective assistance if they’re experiencing difficulties,” he said.

“There’s similar sort of work being done in other industries and I think is an example of the mining industry taking the lead in this area.”

Professor Kelly says he will be working closely with Hunter coal mines as part of the research.
Tri Nature - Environmentally Responsible Household Products

“The focus of this work will be on the coal industry so yes it will be very relevant to the Hunter region and we are looking forward to working closely with mining sites around the Hunter to look at how to support their workforce more effectively,” he said.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

STRESS AND THE FOOD CONNECTION.DESTRESS FROM DISTRESS BY…

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

Fight Stress by Healthy Eating


Whenever we get too busy or stressed, we all tend to make poor food choices that will actually increase stress and cause other problems. To get the most of your healthy eating and avoid stress, follow these simple tips. Always eat breakfast, even though you may think you aren’t hungry, you need to eat something. Skipping breakfast makes it harder to maintain the proper blood and sugar levels during the day, so you should always eat something. Keeping some protein rich snacks in your car, office, or pocket book will help you avoid blood sugar level dips, the accompanying mood swings, and the fatigue. Trail mix, granola bars, and energy bars all have the nutrients you need. If you like to munch when you’re stressed out, you can replace chips or other non healthy foods with carrot sticks, celery sticks, or even sunflower seeds.

Although a lot of people prefer to eat fast food for lunch, you can save a lot of money and actually eat healthier if you take a few minutes and pack a lunch at home. Even if you only do this a few times a week, you’ll see a much better improvement over eating out. As important as it is to get the bad food out of your house, it’s even more important to get the good food in! The best way to do this is to plan a menu of healthy meals at snacks at the beginning of the week, list the ingedients you need, then go shop for it. This way, you’ll know what you want when you need it and you won’t have to stress over what to eat. *

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


AUTISM NOW CAN BE DETECTED BY A URINE TEST

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Autism Finding Could Lead to

Simple Urine Test for the Condition

Science (June 5, 2010) — Children with autism have a different chemical fingerprint in their urine than non-autistic children, according to new research published tomorrow in the print edition of the Journal of Proteome Research.

The researchers behind the study, from Imperial College London and the University of South Australia, suggest that their findings could ultimately lead to a simple urine test to determine whether or not a young child has autism.

Autism affects an estimated one in every 100 people in the UK. People with autism have a range of different symptoms, but they commonly experience problems with communication and social skills, such as understanding other people’s emotions and making conversation and eye contact.

People with autism are also known to suffer from gastrointestinal disorders and they have a different makeup of bacteria in their guts from non-autistic people.

Today’s research shows that it is possible to distinguish between autistic and non-autistic children by looking at the by-products of gut bacteria and the body’s metabolic processes in the children’s urine. The exact biological significance of gastrointestinal disorders in the development of autism is unknown.

The distinctive urinary metabolic fingerprint for autism identified in today’s study could form the basis of a non-invasive test that might help diagnose autism earlier. This would enable autistic children to receive assistance, such as advanced behavioural therapy, earlier in their development than is currently possible.

At present, children are assessed for autism through a lengthy process involving a range of tests that explore the child’s social interaction, communication and imaginative skills.

Early intervention can greatly improve the progress of children with autism but it is currently difficult to establish a firm diagnosis when children are under 18 months of age, although it is likely that changes may occur much earlier than this.

The researchers suggest that their new understanding of the makeup of bacteria in autistic children’s guts could also help scientists to develop treatments to tackle autistic people’s gastrointestinal problems.

Professor Jeremy Nicholson, the corresponding author of the study, who is the Head of the Department of Surgery and Cancer at Imperial College London, said: “Autism is a condition that affects a person’s social skills, so at first it might seem strange that there’s a relationship between autism and what’s happening in someone’s gut. However, your metabolism and the makeup of your gut bacteria reflect all sorts of things, including your lifestyle and your genes. Autism affects many different parts of a person’s system and our study shows that you can see how it disrupts their system by looking at their metabolism and their gut bacteria.

“We hope our findings might be the first step towards creating a simple urine test to diagnose autism at a really young age, although this is a long way off — such a test could take many years to develop and we’re just beginning to explore the possibilities. We know that giving therapy to children with autism when they are very young can make a huge difference to their progress. A urine test might enable professionals to quickly identify children with autism and help them early on,” he added.

The researchers are now keen to investigate whether metabolic differences in people with autism are related to the causes of the condition or are a consequence of its progression.

The researchers reached their conclusions by using H NMR Spectroscopy to analyse the urine of three groups of children aged between 3 and 9: 39 children who had previously been diagnosed with autism, 28 non-autistic siblings of children with autism, and 34 children who did not have autism who did not have an autistic sibling.

They found that each of the three groups had a distinct chemical fingerprint. Non-autistic children with autistic siblings had a different chemical fingerprint than those without any autistic siblings, and autistic children had a different chemical fingerprint than the other two groups.

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 7th June 2010

LOVE IS GOOD FOR YOU IN MANY WAYS

Monday, June 7th, 2010

BETTER PERFORMANCE WHEN YOU FEEL LOVED

MADISON, Wis. (UPI) — U.S. researchers confirm calling mom reduces stress.

Biological anthropologist Leslie Seltzer and psychology professor Seth Pollak, both of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, tested the stress levels of a group of girls ages 7-12 by requiring them to deliver an impromptu speech and do a series of math problems in front of strangers.

“Facing a challenge like that, being evaluated, raises stress levels for a lot of people,” Pollak said in a statement.

Once stressed, one-third of the girls were comforted with a hug by their mothers, one-third watched an emotion-neutral 75-minute video and one-third were handed a telephone with their mother on the line.

“The children who got to interact with their mothers had virtually the same hormonal response, whether they interacted in person or over the phone,” Seltzer says.

The levels of oxytocin — the “love hormone” strongly associated with emotional bonding — rose significantly and the stress-marking cortisol disappeared, the study found.

The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, might explain why many college students call their mothers as soon as they hand in an exam.

“I used to think, ‘How could those over-attentive, helicopter parents encourage that?’ Maybe it’s a quick and dirty way to feel better. It’s not pop psychology or psychobabble,” Pollak said.

Received and published by Henry Sapiecha 7th June 2010

DEPRESSION & VITAMIN D LINK IS REAL

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Depression & Vitamin D: The Emerging Link


Vitamin D has been linked to many health conditions before. A recent study links insufficient levels of the vitamin with the disabling condition depression

In a recent study performed by researchers from the National Institute of Aging in the United States, insufficient levels of vitamin D may be the reason why many individuals over the age of 65 are experiencing symptoms of depression.

Senior individuals often have low levels of the important vitamin because they tend to stay indoors more often, as opposed to younger, more sprightly individuals with more active lifestyles. The study was published in a medical journal on endocrinology this year.

According to Luigi Ferrucci, the lead researcher, the emerging link between vitamin D deficiency and the occurrence of depression must be further investigated.  The study involved a follow-up testing of nearly one thousand male and female respondents within a six-year period.

The researchers used a specialized scale that measured the symptoms of depression called CES-D.  The researchers discovered that those with lower levels of vitamin D in their blood tended to have poorer score in the CES-D test.  Those with higher vitamin D percentages in their blood scored better in the same test.

Alarming, global trend

Depression is fast becoming one of the leading causes of disability around the world, not just in the United States.  It is estimated that today, there are 120 million people afflicted with the condition.  Ferrucci’s study is not the first to point at the possible link between the vitamin and depression.

In an earlier study carried out two years ago, Dutch researchers reported that insufficient levels of the vitamin in the body resulted in a higher percentage of the parathyroid hormone.

This hormone, which is used by the body to regulate calcium loss, has been directly linked to a higher incidence of depression in some one thousand two hundred respondents in yet another independent study.  This is the reason why a causal pathway must be mapped out to determine just how this vitamin affects the human brain.

In a fourth related study, researchers McCann and Arnes noted that vitamin D is important for the proper functioning and health of the human brain.  The widespread presence of vitamin D receptors throughout the human brain is evidence of the vital role of the nutrient in brain health.

According to yet another scientific review, vitamin D has been associated with affecting proteins in the human brain that are responsible for governing the learning process and remembering.  If an imbalance occurs in these areas, you can just imagine a chain reaction occurring throughout the brain.

Benefits of vitamin D

There are several ways that you can get vitamin D: natural exposure to sunlight, food (like dairy products, e.g. yogurt, milk, etc.) and through vitamin supplementation.  The body only needs about 10 – 15 minutes of exposure to natural sunlight to produce vitamin D on its own.

If this is not possible, people with low levels of vitamin D should explore vitamin supplementation; this applies most especially to senior individuals who may not be eating well or are unable to engage in a more active lifestyle.  Instead of using sunscreen when going out to get your healthy dose of sunshine, you can protect your skin naturally by taking natural antioxidants like fresh wheatgrass juice and citrus fruits.

The usual recommended dose for adults is between 400 to 800 IU (international units) of vitamin D everyday. Pregnant women should be given a higher dose (800 IU) to ensure optimum bone health and proper development of the fetus.

And there are more reasons to love vitamin D! Here are some of the most important benefits:

1. It is needed for proper absorption and utilization of calcium and phosphorous.  It is needed for the proper maintenance and repair of the bones and skin.

2. It strengthens and helps maintain the immune function of the body. Conditions like flu and the common cold can be warded off more efficiently if the immune system is strengthened by vitamin D.

3. It is an important nutrient that prevents the occurrence of MS (multiple sclerosis).  According to researchers from the Oregon Health & Science University, MS is less frequent in tropical countries because there is more available sunshine in these places than in temperate regions.

4. Vitamin D has also been linked to the maintenance of normal body weight (according to research from the Medical College of Georgia).

5. Vitamin D is important for brain health in the later years (60 – 79 years of age).

6. In a recent study from the Harvard Medical School, vitamin D can also reduce asthma attacks in asthmatic individuals.

7. We are exposed continually to low levels of radiation.  The good news is vitamin D can also help protect us from such exposures.

According to US cancer researchers, people with adequate levels of vitamin D have a lower risk for many types of cancer than people with low or inadequate levels of the vitamin.

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 7th June 2010