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Archive for the ‘PAIN’ Category

SOME GREAT THINGS TO SAY ABOUT TUMERIC TO FIX PAIN & CURE DISEASES

Saturday, September 16th, 2017

Turmeric is one of the world’s most revered spices. Its praises are sung from the rooftops by herbalists. Entire books have been written extolling its magnificent virtues. Revered in the orient for centuries if not millennia, it has even been called “the world’s most healing spice” and hundreds of scientific papers and other reports have been published attesting to its healing benefits for all manner of conditions including cancer, ulcers, arthritis, alzheimers, cystic fibrosis, hemorrhoids, arteriosclerosis, inflammation and liver diseases.

As you might expect, we have some pages focusing on turmeric and here are some of them:
http://www.herbs-info.com/turmeric.html – our full page including herbal uses, history, claimed health benefits and scientific reports.
600 Reasons Turmeric May Be The World’s Most Important Herb
Top 10 Anti-Inflammatory Herbs

What’s the best way to use turmeric? Essentially, the way that is typically suggested is to simply incorporate it into the diet – using up to 4 grams per day. The taste is strange and unique – difficult to describe. It is not particularly fiery in the manner of for example cayenne or ginger, and personally I really like it, though it may take some getting used to. The best possible way to eat it – as with so many things – is fresh, raw, organic. I do this and simply chop or grate some very small pieces and sprinkle them on top of salads; or (my favorite) on top of my morning eggs on toast – along with organic avocado, heirloom tomato, olives and raw pumpkin seeds… 🙂

Fresh organic turmeric may prove to be a challenge to find (though worth the effort) and so you could resort to the powdered version (typically found in with all the other spices at the supermarket). It is also possible to obtain turmeric in capsule form, so that you can get it down you in a regulated manner without worrying about the bizarre taste or the fact that the amount of powder for optimum health benefits may be more than that which you might sprinkle on to your recipe otherwise.

Another thing to note about turmeric (powder or whole fresh) – it will stain plates, fingertips and work surfaces a bright saffron-yellow color! This will generally come out after a few washes but it’s not a good look to give guests stained plates – and so you may wish to designate specific kitchen utensils / tableware for your turmeric experiments. 😉 I would also counsel against chopping turmeric directly on a marble countertop!

Close up turmeric powder on grunge wooden background.

TUMERIC PAIN RELIEF TEA BELOW

Ok here’s the link to the full turmeric tea tutorial: http://knowledgeweighsnothing.com/how-to-make-turmeric-pain-relief-tea/

Henry Sapiecha

 

Heart attack, stroke: popular painkillers to carry health warnings after 2016

Saturday, November 21st, 2015

spoonfull of pills image www.newcures.infopulsating heart animation image www.newcures.infoAttention sign image www.worldwidediamonds.info

The warnings will state ‘excessive use can be harmful and increase the risk of heart attack, stroke or liver damage’.

Some of Australia’s most popular painkilling medications will carry warnings from next year that they could put people at risk of heart attack and stroke.

The medications, which contain the active ingredients ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen, are freely available at the chemist and supermarket under brand names such as Nurofen, Advil and Voltaren.

Health authorities stopped short of the more radical actions of other countries such as the UK, where diclofenac has been made prescription-only.

Earlier this year, US health authorities warned even a few weeks of using the drugs could increase a person’s risk of a fatal heart attack.

Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has been reviewing the safety of the drugs against the back of increasing reports of dangerous cardiovascular complications.

In 2010, Fairfax Media reported that the drugs had been linked to stroke and some experts believed they should be banned or sold only on prescription.

The TGA said its review found the medications were “safe when they were used according to the recommended doses for short durations, as instructed on the label”.

“However, inappropriate use or overuse of these medicines could pose a significant risk of cardiovascular events and, in the case of diclofenac, [liver toxicity],” it said.

The drugs are a type of medicine known as a “non-steroidal anti-inflammatory” medications. Another of this class of drugs, the arthritis drug Vioxx, triggered a $4.85 billion lawsuit amid evidence it doubled the risk of heart attack for patients, causing as many as 140,000 in the US alone.

All forms of ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen will now carry a warning that using them at high doses can increase your risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

The warning will state: “Do not use for more than a few days at a time unless a doctor has told you to. Do not exceed the recommended dose. Excessive use can be harmful and increase the risk of heart attack, stroke or liver damage.”

Most medications will be expected to carry the label by July 2016, although some have been given an extension until January 2017.

The Australian Self Medication Industry supports the changes to the warning labels, however, Alphapharm, which makes non-brand name generic versions of medicines, said while warnings on packets were sufficient for medications sold in pharmacies because of the quality of information provided by pharmacists, product inserts were needed when the drugs were sold at supermarkets to make sure consumers were properly informed.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

AUSTRALIA: Over-the-counter sale of codeine pain killers such as Nurofen Plus and Panadeine may end

Monday, April 27th, 2015

woman with headache image www.newcures.info

Proposed changes could see a doctor’s visit required for current over-the-counter painkillers.

Access to Nurofen Plus, Panadeine and other common painkillers sold to millions of Australians each year could soon be curtailed by health authorities amid reports of harmful side effects, addiction and fatal overuse.

Australia’s drug regulator is considering a proposal to make about 150 codeine products prescription-only medicines, meaning they could no longer be freely purchased over the counter at pharmacies and would require a visit to a doctor.

Medicines affected by the change could include Codral Original Cold and Flu Tablets, Aspalgin Soluble tablets and Mersyndol Tablets, which are marketed for short-term pain such as headaches, toothaches and period pain.

pain relief pill box sketch image www.newcures.info

Although many people use the drugs safely in recommended amounts, doctors say an increasing number are suffering severe gastrointestinal damage and internal bleeding from taking excessive doses of ibuprofen, which is often mixed with codeine, a weak but potentially-addictive opioid.
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In 2013, Monash University researchers reported nine deaths over a decade linked to toxicity from codeine-ibuprofen medicines such as Nurofen Plus.

Codeine addicts swallowing up to 100 tablets a day have been known to visit multiple pharmacies to get around rules introduced in 2010 that restrict purchases of more than five days’ supply of the drug at one time.

Recent government agency data shows the number of Australians being treated for codeine addiction more than tripled over the decade to 2012-13, from 318 to more than 1000 a year. But Matthew Frei, addiction medicine specialist and clinical director of Turning Point Alcohol & Drug Centre, said this figure probably vastly underestimated the number of problem users as many patients who abused drugs were not detected.

In response to these concerns, a July meeting of the Therapeutic Goods Administration’s Advisory Committee on Medicines Scheduling will discuss whether codeine drugs should be made “schedule 4” drugs that require a doctor’s prescription. They are currently “schedule 3” medicines.

While Australian Medical Association Victorian branch president Tony Bartone said he personally supported the idea of making codeine a prescription only drug, the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia and the Pharmacy Guild of Australia opposes the proposal. It says governments should instead be investing in real-time prescription monitoring systems to better detect people abusing the drugs.

Pharmacy Guild Victorian president Anthony Tassone​ said pharmacists were qualified to determine who could purchase codeine products over the counter and who should be referred to a doctor for further discussion.

“For pharmacists to supply schedule 3 medication including codeine they need to establish a genuine therapeutic need,” he said.

Australian Self Medication Industry executive director Deon Schoombie​ said forcing people to go to their doctor for codeine tablets ran the risk of them walking away from their GPs with even stronger drugs.

“It just shifts the problem [to doctors]. Does it solve the problem? I doubt it,” he said.

But pain medicine specialist Dr Michael Vagg said codeine purchased over the counter was in such low doses that some people may find themselves taking more and more to produce meaningful pain relief.

Furthermore, he said up to 30 per cent of people do not have the right enzymes in their liver to process codeine, meaning they will not experience pain relief when taking it but will experience other side effects.

“You could certainly make a case that it’s not valuable enough and that it’s too harmful,” said Dr Vagg, a senior lecturer at Deakin University Medical School.

“If you have severe acute pain and the simple analgesics are not cutting it, you are better off going to your doctor to get a diagnosis and prescription. With persistent pain, that advice is even more important. Trying to manage long-term persistent pain with lots of doses of short-acting analgesics is not the best approach.”

BAYER PATENTS ASPIRIN IN 1899

Sunday, March 6th, 2011

March 6: General Interest
1899 : Bayer patents aspirin

On this day in 1899, the Imperial Patent Office in Berlin registers Aspirin, the brand name for acetylsalicylic acid, on behalf of the German pharmaceutical company Friedrich Bayer & Co.

Now the most common drug in household medicine cabinets, acetylsalicylic acid was originally made from a chemical found in the bark of willow trees. In its primitive form, the active ingredient, salicin, was used for centuries in folk medicine, beginning in ancient Greece when Hippocrates used it to relieve pain and fever. Known to doctors since the mid-19thcentury, it was used sparingly due to its unpleasant taste and tendency to damage the stomach.

In 1897, Bayer employee Felix Hoffman found a way to create a stable form of the drug that was easier and more pleasant to take. (Some evidence shows that Hoffman’s work was really done by a Jewish chemist, Arthur Eichengrun, whose contributions were covered up during the Nazi era.) After obtaining the patent rights, Bayer began distributing aspirin in powder form to physicians to give to their patients one gram at a time. The brand name came from “a” for acetyl, “spir” from the spirea plant (a source of salicin) and the suffix “in,” commonly used for medications. It quickly became the number-one drug worldwide.

Aspirin was made available in tablet form and without a prescription in 1915. Two years later, when Bayer’s patent expired during the First World War, the company lost the trademark rights to aspirin in various countries. After the United States entered the war against Germany in April 1917, the Alien Property Custodian, a government agency that administers foreign property, seized Bayer’s U.S. assets. Two years later, the Bayer company name and trademarks for the United States and Canada were auctioned off and purchased by Sterling Products Company, later Sterling Winthrop, for $5.3 million.

Bayer became part of IG Farben, the conglomerate of German chemical industries that formed the financial heart of the Nazi regime. After World War II, the Allies split apart IG Farben, and Bayer again emerged as an individual company. Its purchase of Miles Laboratories in 1978 gave it a product line including Alka-Seltzer and Flintstones and One-A-Day Vitamins. In 1994, Bayer bought Sterling Winthrop’s over-the-counter business, gaining back rights to the Bayer name and logo and allowing the company once again to profit from American sales of its most famous product.

Received & published by Henry Sapiecha


LAYOFF THE PAIN KILLERS AND SAY GOODBYE TO HEART ATTACKS & STROKES

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

Popular painkillers linked to heart and stroke risk

Feelin’ lucky? Then go ahead – pop that painkiller.

But you’d better hope that today’s not the day your luck finally runs out, because some of the most commonly used pain meds carry a major death risk.

The drugs are those nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories used by millions for everything from arthritis to headaches to back pain. And now, researchers say they can double, triple, and even quadruple your odds of heart attack, stroke, and an early death.

Swiss researchers looked at data from 31 “gold-standard” trials that included 116,429 patients, and found that ibuprofen – a med probably in your own home right now – can triple the risk of stroke.

And diclofenac, a widely used generic prescription NSAID, can quadruple the risk of death from heart attack and stroke.

These problems aren’t rare by any stretch. In fact, the researchers say that for every 25 to 50 patients who take NSAIDs for a year, there will be one extra heart attack or stroke.

That’s overall.

But they also believe that patients who already have heart problems could face a much higher risk when they pop those pills – like the millions of seniors who battle both heart disease and arthritis.

The researchers found naproxen (aka Aleve) to be the “safest” of the NSAIDs, but don’t kid yourself – “safest” doesn’t mean “safe.” All painkillers carry risk – and regular use of any NSAID can lead to bleeding problems, ulcers, and more.

And that means you need to be careful with how – and how often – you use these things, no matter how old you are or what risks you face.

If you need one from time to time, you need one – and I won’t stand in your way.

But if you’re taking one of these things regularly, there’s clearly something else going on – and you and your doc need to get to the bottom of it.

If you go looking for that answer at the bottom of a painkiller jar, you could find yourself at the bottom of a grave.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


MIGRAINES & STROKES PROVEN CONNECTION

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Link Between Migraines And Stroke Confirmed

Migraine headaches may do much more damage than cause a throbbing pain. A new study confirms that individuals who suffer from migraines are about twice as likely to have a stroke caused by a blood clot, compared to those who don’t get the painful headaches. According to Reuters, researchers analyzed the results of 21 previous studies conducted between 1975 and 2007, and involving more than 622,000 adults with and without migraines. More »

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

MANGROVE PLANTS IN AUSTRALIA NUMB PAIN AFTER CROCODILE ATTACK

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

News in Science

Mangrove bark dulls the pain

Wednesday, 23 June 2004 Judy Skatssoon
ABC


Freshwater mangrove

The bark of the freshwater mangrove, which is found in monsoonal areas, is used as a painkiller in Aboriginal medicine (Image: Len Webb Collection, Griffith University)

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Queensland researchers are working to develop a new pain-killing drug from a native Australian plant traditionally used by Aboriginal people.

Professor of chemistry at Griffith University Ron Quinn is identifying and testing compounds from the freshwater mangrove Barringtonia acutangula for their analgesic properties.

The mangrove, which is also known as the Indian Oak or Kandu almond, grows by creeks and lagoons and is distributed throughout east Asia, south-east Asia, eastern Africa, the south-west Pacific and northern Australia.

Quinn said he first learned of the plant’s analgesic potential after hearing about an Aboriginal man in the Kimberley region of north-western Australia whose finger had been bitten off by a crocodile.

“He used the bark of the tree, chewed it around in his mouth and then put it on the wound,” Quinn said.

It was unclear whether the benefit came from chewing the plant or using it as a poultice on the wound.

Quinn said researchers had isolated several compounds from the plant’s bark and tested them on rats.

One compound showed signs of being effective when administered orally.

“We started out looking at the crude extract and we’ve isolated some components of it and we’ve now tested a couple of these and found one of them is actually active in the animal model,” he said.

He said a A$174,500 (US$119,000) grant from the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council development funding, announced earlier this month, would enable more detailed testing of the plant and help assess its commercial potential.

A large-scale extraction and isolation process would obtain the compounds in large enough quantities to allow them to be pharmacologically evaluated as potential analgesic drugs.

“There’s an unmet need in management of pain so there’s a potential market opportunity,” he said.

“It will depend a bit on the precise mechanism and precise biology that we see.”

Quinn said the active compound appeared to be novel and structurally unrelated to opiate painkillers.

Quinn said Griffith University held a provisional patent on several compounds extracted from the plant and hoped to develop a drug under a joint agreement with the local Aboriginal people, who would receive 50% of any returns once the product was brought to market.

Human trials remain some years away.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

MORPHINE WORKS WONDERS ON CANCER TUMOURS

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

Morphine Blocks Tumor Growth,

Study Suggests

Science (July 28, 2010) — Current research suggests that taking morphine can block new blood vessel and tumor growth. The related report by Koodie et al, “Morphine suppresses tumor angiogenesis through a HIF1?/p38MAPK pathway,” appears in the August 2010 issue of the American Journal of Pathology.


Morphine is currently the gold standard of analgesics used to relieve severe pain and suffering. Angiogenesis, or new blood vessel growth, is critical for tumor progression from dormant to malignant. Morphine is commonly used to treat cancer pain, but the effects of morphine use on new blood vessel and tumor growth remain controversial.

Using a clinically relevant morphine dose in a mouse model of Lewis lung carcinoma, researchers led by Dr. Sabita Roy of the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis, MN examined the effect of morphine use on new blood vessel growth in tumors. They found that chronic morphine use decreased levels of tumor angiogenesis in a manner dependent on the opioid receptor. This effect was mediated by suppression of signaling induced by low oxygen concentrations, leading to a reduction in the levels of pro-angiogenic factors. Therefore, morphine may not only serve as an analgesic for cancer patients, but may also inhibit tumor angiogenesis and growth.

Koodie et al conclude that “morphine is a potential inhibitor of tumor growth, through the suppression of tumor cell-induced angiogenesis and hypoxia-induced p38 MAPK activation of HIF-1. In addition to its analgesic potential, morphine can be exploited for its anti-angiogenic potential in cancer pain management; these findings support the use of morphine for cancer pain management.”

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

CHERRY PIE NEVER TASTED SO GOOD – BE PAIN FREE

Friday, May 28th, 2010

Pain Relief
Is As Easy
As Pie!

Did you realize…

Cherries are 10 times more powerful than aspirin for stopping joint pain? Scientists at Michigan State University proved it.

Reason? They contain amazing phytonutrients called anthocyanins which block inflammation just like NSAID drugs do. Plus they prevent the oxidative damage that cause cancer, heart disease, and other disease.

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 28th May 2010

BAYER DISCOVERS ASPRIN 1899

Sunday, March 7th, 2010

1899 : Bayer patents aspirin

On this day in 1899, the Imperial Patent Office in Berlin registers Aspirin, the brand name for acetylsalicylic acid, on behalf of the German pharmaceutical company Friedrich Bayer & Co.

Now the most common drug in household medicine cabinets, acetylsalicylic acid was originally made from a chemical found in the bark of willow trees. In its primitive form, the active ingredient, salicin, was used for centuries in folk medicine, beginning in ancient Greece when Hippocrates used it to relieve pain and fever. Known to doctors since the mid-19thcentury, it was used sparingly due to its unpleasant taste and tendency to damage the stomach.

In 1897, Bayer employee Felix Hoffman found a way to create a stable form of the drug that was easier and more pleasant to take. (Some evidence shows that Hoffman’s work was really done by a Jewish chemist, Arthur Eichengrun, whose contributions were covered up during the Nazi era.) After obtaining the patent rights, Bayer began distributing aspirin in powder form to physicians to give to their patients one gram at a time. The brand name came from “a” for acetyl, “spir” from the spirea plant (a source of salicin) and the suffix “in,” commonly used for medications. It quickly became the number-one drug worldwide.


Aspirin was made available in tablet form and without a prescription in 1915. Two years later, when Bayer’s patent expired during the First World War, the company lost the trademark rights to aspirin in various countries. After the United States entered the war against Germany in April 1917, the Alien Property Custodian, a government agency that administers foreign property, seized Bayer’s U.S. assets. Two years later, the Bayer company name and trademarks for the United States and Canada were auctioned off and purchased by Sterling Products Company, later Sterling Winthrop, for $5.3 million.

Bayer became part of IG Farben, the conglomerate of German chemical industries that formed the financial heart of the Nazi regime. After World War II, the Allies split apart IG Farben, and Bayer again emerged as an individual company. Its purchase of Miles Laboratories in 1978 gave it a product line including Alka-Seltzer and Flintstones and One-A-Day Vitamins. In 1994, Bayer bought Sterling Winthrop’s over-the-counter business, gaining back rights to the Bayer name and logo and allowing the company once again to profit from American sales of its most famous product.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha 17th March 2010