Categories

Archive for the ‘PLANTS’ Category

How an Australian man poisoned himself with apricot kernel extract

Monday, September 18th, 2017

A study reveals how a Australian [Victoria] man poisoned himself after taking home-made apricot kernel extract and a fruit kernel supplement for five years.

A Victorian man who gave himself cyanide poisoning from an apricot kernel extract highlights the dangers of some supplementary medicines, doctors say.

The 67-year-old was found to have 25 times the acceptable level of cyanide in his blood following routine surgery in 2015, a study published in the BMJ medical journal reveals.

He told doctors he’d taken two teaspoons of home-made apricot kernel extract and three Novodalin, or herbal fruit kernel supplement tablets, daily for five years.

The study’s lead author and anaesthetist at Melbourne’s the Alfred Hospital, Dr Alex Konstantatos, said this added up to 17.32mg of cyanide a day.

Cyanide interfers with the body’s ability to use oxygen and is marketed for cancer prevention but there’s no proof of this, he said.

“(The patient) believed very strongly that the kernel extract was going to prevent a cancer … from coming back,” Dr Konstantatos said.

“It’s not known what the effect of having a level of cyanide that’s not enough to kill you suddenly, but (is) still quite high – we don’t know what the long-term effects of it are.”

The patient continued to take the extract and supplement until recently, when he was blocked from buying raw apricot kernels or importing the tablets.

But Dr Konstantatos said his case highlighted a broader problem with these kinds of supplements.

“We went to all the trouble to measure it, confirm it and to publish the study to show that this gentleman’s probably just the tip of the iceberg, he said

“People who take medicines like this, in this unregulated way, do not know how much, exactly, they’re taking.

“That’s exactly what makes it so dangerous.”

Henry Sapiecha

SOME GREAT THINGS TO SAY ABOUT TUMERIC TO FIX PAIN & CURE DISEASES

Saturday, September 16th, 2017

Turmeric is one of the world’s most revered spices. Its praises are sung from the rooftops by herbalists. Entire books have been written extolling its magnificent virtues. Revered in the orient for centuries if not millennia, it has even been called “the world’s most healing spice” and hundreds of scientific papers and other reports have been published attesting to its healing benefits for all manner of conditions including cancer, ulcers, arthritis, alzheimers, cystic fibrosis, hemorrhoids, arteriosclerosis, inflammation and liver diseases.

As you might expect, we have some pages focusing on turmeric and here are some of them:
http://www.herbs-info.com/turmeric.html – our full page including herbal uses, history, claimed health benefits and scientific reports.
600 Reasons Turmeric May Be The World’s Most Important Herb
Top 10 Anti-Inflammatory Herbs

What’s the best way to use turmeric? Essentially, the way that is typically suggested is to simply incorporate it into the diet – using up to 4 grams per day. The taste is strange and unique – difficult to describe. It is not particularly fiery in the manner of for example cayenne or ginger, and personally I really like it, though it may take some getting used to. The best possible way to eat it – as with so many things – is fresh, raw, organic. I do this and simply chop or grate some very small pieces and sprinkle them on top of salads; or (my favorite) on top of my morning eggs on toast – along with organic avocado, heirloom tomato, olives and raw pumpkin seeds… 🙂

Fresh organic turmeric may prove to be a challenge to find (though worth the effort) and so you could resort to the powdered version (typically found in with all the other spices at the supermarket). It is also possible to obtain turmeric in capsule form, so that you can get it down you in a regulated manner without worrying about the bizarre taste or the fact that the amount of powder for optimum health benefits may be more than that which you might sprinkle on to your recipe otherwise.

Another thing to note about turmeric (powder or whole fresh) – it will stain plates, fingertips and work surfaces a bright saffron-yellow color! This will generally come out after a few washes but it’s not a good look to give guests stained plates – and so you may wish to designate specific kitchen utensils / tableware for your turmeric experiments. 😉 I would also counsel against chopping turmeric directly on a marble countertop!

Close up turmeric powder on grunge wooden background.

TUMERIC PAIN RELIEF TEA BELOW

Ok here’s the link to the full turmeric tea tutorial: http://knowledgeweighsnothing.com/how-to-make-turmeric-pain-relief-tea/

Henry Sapiecha

 

The Tree of Life plant Moringa Oleifera Kills 97% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells in Vitro

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

We just discovered an amazing report about Moringa, courtesy of our friends over at The Eden Prescription. In 2013 scientists reported in a paper published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A peer-reviewed, open access journal) that A hot-water extract of the leaves of Moringa Oleifera killed up to 97% of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1) after 72 hours in lab tests. Moringa leaf extract inhibited the growth of all pancreatic cell lines tested. [1]

Pancreatic cancer is very serious, one of the worst. Fewer than 6% patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas live five years after diagnosis. The typical treatment is currently chemotherapy.

Called the “miracle tree” on account of its many virtues, Moringa is very well known in India, parts of Africa, the Philippines and several other countries, yet it is relatively unknown in countries such as the USA. However it seems from the current buzz around it that it may well soon experience a rise to new popularity. It has a long history of use in traditional medicine due to its properties as an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, antidepressant, anti-diabetes, pain and fever reducer and even asthma treatment. We’ve dedicated a full page on our site to a detailed herbal report on the amazing Moringa and those interested in herbalism would do well to investigate this plant.

It also contains numerous powerful anti-cancer compounds such as kaempferol, rhamnetin and isoquercetin. Now, researchers are discovering that Moringa has anti-cancer potential with positive results so far against ovarian cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma in lab tests. A list of these studies can be seen on Pubmed here.

Please note that it’s a long way before Moringa can be claimed as a cancer cure, but this kind of study is important because it indicates the potential for a starting point for a medicine of the future. It’s especially interesting because Moringa is already in common use – not only in herbalism but in a wide variety of other applications.

Moringa is now extensively cultivated throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, but the largest Moringa crop in the world is produced by India – where it grows natively. It’s fascinating to note that may be one reason why the death rate from pancreatic cancer in India is a stunning 84% lower than in the United States!

**Moringa plants,material & seeds are available HERE.

Note – This article is not medical advice nor a substitute for consultation with a medical professional.

Note 2 – “In Vitro” literally means “In Glassware” and is the Latin expression to denote that the tests were done on cell cultures in a lab, as opposed to “In Vivo” which means tested on living creatures. Such studies indicate preliminary success but much more research will be needed to “prove” efficacy in humans. Though the huge disparity in pancreatic cancer rates in India is highly encouraging.

Check out our full “herbal page” on Moringa – tons of detailed information for those wishing to study this plant in depth: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Please check out The Eden Prescription for more reports on the cutting edge science being done investigating the medicinal properties of herbs!

References:

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957955

Moringa oleifera and the hot water infusions derived from its flowers, roots, leaves, seeds, and bark were also determined to possess antispasmodic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the seed infusion appears to suppress the contraction induced by acetylcholine in this study (ED50 of 65.6 mg/mL) and the edema stimulated by carrageenan at 1000 mg/kg. Diuretic activity was noted at a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. Some of these cited biological properties were also noted in the roots. [24]

Moringa – Active Compounds

One thing that Moringa truly and clearly has under its belt is its being a rich and good source – not to mention affordable and readily accessible – of vital minerals and vitamins, protein, β-carotene, amino acids, and various phenolics. Zeatin, quercetin, β-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid, and kaempferol can also be isolated from Moringa. [25] Upon a comprehensive analysis of Moringa glucosinolates and phenolics (including flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and cinnamates), Bennett et al. (2003) found that:

The seeds contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate at high concentrations.

The roots have high concentrations of 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and benzyl glucosinolate.

The leaves contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and three monoacetyl isomers of this glucosinolate; quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-(6′ ‘-malonyl-glucoside); kaempferol-3-O-glucoside and kaempferol-3-O-(6’ ‘-malonyl-glucoside) in lower amounts; and 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid.

The bark contains 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate. [24]

Names of Moringa, past and present

English: Moringa, Horseradish Tree, Tree Of Life, Moringa Tree of Paradise, Moringa the Never Die Tree, Drumstick Tree, Ben Oil Tree, Ben Tree
Latin (scientific nomenclature): Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Hyperanthera moringa (archaic)
Tamil: Murungai / Murungai Maram
Mandarin: la mu
Cantonese: lat mok (lit. ‘spicy wood’)
Filipino: malunggay / kamungay
Hindi / Indian: munaga / shajna
Spanish: palo de aceite / libertad
French: ben olifiere
Ayurvedic: Shigru / Shobhanjana
Hindi: Sahjan
Punjabi: Surajan
Konkani: Mhasanga Saang
Telugu: Munagachettu

Morniga – General Information

Moringa is a genus of 13 species of tropical and subtropical plants. The most widely known of these, and the subject of this article, is Moringa oleifera – a tree native to northwestern India. Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to as just “Moringa”, grows fast in a variety of climates and is cultivated in many regions because it can grow in poor or even some barren soils. Much of the plant is edible. The leaves are nutritious and are used as food for people and feed for livestock. [1]

The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. [2]

The moringa tree, when left to its own devices, usually grows as much as ten metres, although when cultivated for its leaves, seed pods (aka ‘drumsticks’), seeds, or flowers it is usually trimmed and maintained at an easily reachable length of one to three metres tall to allow for easier harvesting of its constituent parts.

Proponents of Moringa oleifera sing its praises. It has been described as “one of the most useful plants that exists” – owing to its unusual combination of high nutritional value, medicinal properties, fast growing and ability to thrive in arid environments. The leaves are rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron.

One of the reasons the Moringa tree can thrive in arid regions is that it has a long taproot – which also makes it valuable against soil erosion. [3] The main products made from the plant are edible seed oil, tea leaves and animal feed. The seed kernels are also used by the French perfume manufacturing industry. [4] The Moringa tree is now widely cultivated in Africa, Sri Lanka, India, Central and South America, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other food may be scarce. [5]

Moringa oleifera is listed in the AHPA’s “Herbs of Commerce”, p98. [6]

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

References & Further Reading

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[3] http://www.miracletrees.org

[4] http://web.archive.org/web/20090906184503/http://www.shaebia.org/artman/publish/article_5934.shtml

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[6] “Herbs of Commerce” (AHPA) (2000 edition) – Michael McGuffin, John T. Kartesz, Albert Y Leung, Arthur O. Tucker p.98

[7] http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Moringa.html

[8] http://books.google.com/books?id=ZUw-AAAAcAAJ

[9] http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa

[10] http://web.archive.org/web/20120821200349/http://moringafact.com/health-benefit-of-moringa-leaves-and-moringa-seeds/

[11] http://edlagman.com/moringa/moringa-health-benefits.htm

[12] http://leafpower.wordpress.com/moringa-benefits/

[13] http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/201276/moringa-malunggay-philippines#.ULEkU-Tqk8o

[14] http://www.sooperarticles.com/food-drinks-articles/health-benefits-recipe-ben-oil-tree-malunggay-798017.html

[15] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-oil.php

[16] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-benefits.php

[17] http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95883:the-nutritional-and-healing-benefits-of-moringa&catid=105: saturday-magazine&Itemid=566

[18] http://books.google.com/books?id=tR6gAAAAMAAJ (p.123)

[19] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19666102

[20] Anwar F., Latif S., Ashraf M., & Gilani A. H. (2007). Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytotherapy Research, 21(1): 17–25. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17089328/

[21] Mbikay M. (2012). Therapeutic potential of Moringa oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia: A review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3:24. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00024. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290775/

[22] Ndong M., Uehara M., Katsumata S., & Suzuki K. (2007). Effects of oral administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar rats. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 40(3): 229–233. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.40.229. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398501/

[23] Jaiswal D., Kumar Rai P., Kumar A., Mehta S., & Watal G. (2009).Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3): 392–396. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.036. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501271/

[24] Cáceres A., Saravia A., Rizzo S., Zabala L., De Leon E., & Nave F. (1992).Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2: Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diuretic activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 36(3): 233–237. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1434682/

[25] Bennett R. N. et al. (2003).Profiling glucosinolates and phenolics in vegetative and reproductive tissues of the multi-purpose trees Moringa oleifera L. (horseradish tree) and Moringa stenopetala L. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(12): 3546–3553. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12769522/

*** MORINGA PLANTS-SEEDS & MATERIAL AVAILABLE HERE

CONTENT FOR THIS ARTICLE WAS OBTAINED FROM THE GREAT SITE BELOW

http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Henry Sapiecha

Do Not Throw Away The Healthiest Part Of Your Avocado

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

It’s well known that the avocado is great source of healthy fats as well as other super nutrients. But what you may now know is that you’ve been throwing away the healthiest part of your avocado…. the stone.

The Avocado’s Inside Secret

Did you know that the seed holds 70% of the avocado’s antioxidants! And yet, for years, we’ve been tossing it into the trash without a second thought. Also, just as green tea has been praised for its cancer fighting polyphenols, this hard, round avocado super-ball has been given the same distinguished praise. [1]

There’s more: it turns out that avocado seeds also have just as much beneficial soluble fiber as other top rated fiber foods. Along with the soluble fiber, the antioxidants work in the digestive tract to promote optimal digestive health as well as suppress tumor growth. The healthy oils found in the heart of this fruit are a great resource for our skin. Its natural fat helps to keep skin and hair look young, smooth, and supple. In South America, people use the seed as a herbal remedy to treat gastrointestinal tract problems. It has also been used for inflammation and diarrhea. [2]

But How To Eat The Seed…?

It’s understandable why people discard the stone: It’s super hard. My dental plan would probably not cover the cost to repair my teeth after gnawing on a bowling ball-like seed, no matter what the health benefits would be! So let me offer you the technique to access the health benefits of the avocado seed: Make it into powder.

Start by drying out the seed on a sunny window sill – or you can use a food dehydrator. After the avocado stone is thoroughly dry, chop(carefully!) the seed into four pieces. Then place the pieces in your food processor or blender and grind into a powder.

You can sprinkle the avocado seed powder directly on your food, your soups, salads, pastas, and anything else you would like. If you find the taste too bitter, I suggest adding it to a smoothie along with other fruits and veggies to mask its taste. One seed will give you enough powder for two smoothies. Another way to take in the goodness of the avocado seed is to make a tea. Simply place half of a seed in boiling water for 10 minutes or add one tablespoon of ground up seed powder to a cup of boiling water. [3]

Now that you know how powerful the avocado seed is, start collecting them and drying them out!

References:

[1] http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/most-people-are-throwing-healthiest-part-of-avocado-away-a6677211.html
[2] http://dailysuperfoodlove.com/4448/the-surprising-benefits-of-avocado-seeds/
[3] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3257112/Avocado-SEED-makes-70-nutritional-benefits-know-eat-it.html

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Potent Plant powder power prevents malaria victims from dying

Monday, May 8th, 2017

So what is this plant?

Weathers has made several high-producing versions of the plant using tissue cultures  (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

When 18 malaria patients in the Congo failed to respond to conventional treatments and instead continued to head toward terminal status, doctors knew they had to act fast – and try something different. So instead of turning to more synthetic drugs, they turned instead to nature and found a solution that delivered remarkable results.

The patients were first treated with the regimen described by the World Health Organization (WHO): artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This drug combines an extract from a plant known as Artemisia annua, with other drugs that launch a multi-pronged attack on the malaria parasite. But just as is the case with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the malaria parasite is evolving to resist the drugs designed to kill it. In fact, according to the WHO, three of the five malarial parasites that infect humans have shown drug resistance.

As the patients continued to decline, with one five-year-old even entering into a coma, the doctors administered a drug called artesunate intravenously, which is the preferred course of action when treating severe malaria. The treatment didn’t work.

Finally, doctors turned to the Artemisia annua plant itself. Also called sweet wormwood or sweet Annie, the plant is the source of the chemical artemisinin, which is used in ACT therapy. The plant has been used since ancient times in Chinese medicine to treat fevers, although this bit of knowledge was lost until 1970 when the Chinese Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergency Treatments (340 AD) was rediscovered. In 1971 it was found that extracts from the plant could fight malaria in primates.

Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute began researching Artemisia annua over 25 years ago. Along with postdoctoral fellow Melissa Towler, Weathers created a pill made from nothing more than the dried and powdered leaves of the plant. When the pills were given to the 18 dying patients over the course of five days, all of them completely recovered, with no trace of the malaria parasite remaining in their blood.

“These 18 patients were dying,” Weathers said. “So to see 100 percent recover, even the child who had lapsed into a coma, was just amazing. It’s a small study, but the results are powerful.”

Weathers had previously shown that the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant (DLA) could deliver 40 times more Artemisia annua to the blood than extracts of the plant alone. In a later experiment, she showed that not only could the leaves beat drug-resistant bacteria in mice, but that after passing the malaria parasite through 49 generations of mice, the parasite still showed no resistance to the plant.

While the exact mechanism through which DLA operates is unclear, Weathers says it’s likely due to the intricate chemical dance that occurs between the phytochemicals in the leaves.

Weathers with the Artemisia plant (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

Because the drug is inexpensive and relatively simply to produce, Weathers also says that it could be a source of industry for people living in the areas where malaria is a problem, such as Ghana, Kenya and Malawi where it was recently announced that the first malaria vaccines will be deployed. “This simple technology can be owned, operated, and distributed by Africans for Africans,” said Weathers, who has already established a supply chain on the continent for the leaves using local producers.

Weathers also said that further research into DLA could lead to effective ways to combat other maladies.

“We have done a lot of work to understand the biochemistry of these compounds, which include a number of flavonoids and terpenes, so we can better understand the role they play in the pharmacological activity of the dried leaves,” Weathers said. “The more we learn, the more excited we become about the potential for DLA to be the medication of choice for combatting malaria worldwide. Artemisia annua is known to be efficacious against a range of other diseases, including other tropical maladies and certain cancers, so in our lab we are already at work investigating the effectiveness of DLA with other diseases.”

The results of the case in the Congo have been described in the journal Phytomedicine. You can hear more from Weathers in the video below.

Source: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

www.pythonjungle.com

Henry Sapiecha

 

Seeds of hope for cancer victims Video & story

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

blushwood-berries -in-hand image www.newcures.info

Dr Victoria Gordon and Dr Paul Reddell have discovered a compound EBC-46 that may transform cancer treatment in the fruit of the Brushwood tree in the rainforest on the Atherton tablelands.North Queensland Australia  Source: News Limited

VICTORIA Gordon holds in her hands the chance at life that she had to deny her cancer-stricken sister: a potential breakthrough drug that “eats” tumours.

Dr Gordon and her husband, fellow scientist Paul Reddell, discovered the compound in a north Queensland rainforest and have spent nearly a decade developing the drug and dem­onstrating its effectiveness in ­animals.

Hundreds of horses, dogs, cats, even a Tasmanian devil had life-threatening tumours reduced to harmless sludge by the experimental drug, EBC-46, produced from the seed of the common blushwood tree.

Now, at last, it is to be tested on people battling advanced melanoma and notoriously difficult to treat head and neck cancers. Clinical trials are set to get under way in a number of hospitals by September.

Dr Gordon and Dr Reddell realised something special was happening when they saw hungry rat kangaroos spit out fallen berries from the blushwood tree, which grows only in the tropical rainforests of the Atherton Tablelands, west of Cairns.

The chemical responsible for this “feeding deterrent’’ turned out to be EBC-46, propelling Dr Gordon to her moment of truth with her dying sister, Cheryl.

The 61-year-old chef begged Dr Gordon to toss away the rule book and let her have the experimental drug before she succumbed last December to liver cancer. “I couldn’t,’’ a tearful Dr Gordon says, for the first time telling her story of scientific discovery and its anguished denouement with her older sister.

“Basically, the question Cheryl asked was, ‘Do you believe EBC-46 could help me, and can I have the drug?’ Factually, I said to her we were unsure of the role EBC-46 would play in liver cancer and, even so, this is a drug that has not yet been approved for human use. And, as such, no, she could not use the drug. I just had to be … cold and clinical with that. It was heartbreaking.’’

Dr Gordon and Dr Reddell have been reluctant to speak in detail about EBC-46 until now, with the clinical phase I/II human trial in sight. If all goes to plan, the program will begin within months with about 30 cancer patients, all of them “at the end of the line’’ with conventional treatments.

Turning down her sister was the hardest thing Dr Gordon has had to do. “We are asked almost on a daily basis for access to this drug,’’ she says. “I am sincere when I say this … as much as I would dearly love to help those in need, it’s simply not an option. The regulators and the rules are there to protect patients. Yes, we have very good results in the animals. But if we have not proven this drug is a safe drug to use in people, there is no way we should be making it available.’’

>>>>More CLINICAL information please read this original research work.

Atherton vet Justine Campbell, one of the first to treat pets with the drug, said she was approached by a client who had terminal melanoma. “He was desperate,’’ she said. “He had heard about EBC-46 and asked, ‘Can you treat me?’ And I had to say to him, to his face, ‘I’m sorry, I can’t.’ It’s just awful.’’

Years of research into the drug’s effectiveness in animals have been submitted for publication in an international scientific journal by Dr Gordon, Dr Reddell and scientists from Brisbane’s QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute.

The head of the institute’s Cancer Drug Mechanism Group, Glen Boyle, said the drug broke down tumours within hours of being injected into them. Human melanoma grown on the skin of laboratory mice began to swell by the time the animals were returned to their cage, a sign the powerful response triggered by the drug was choking off the tumour’s blood supply. Minutes later, the growth was a bruised purple, a sign the cancer cells were dying.

“A couple of days after that there is a scab where the tumour used to be,’’ said Dr Boyle, the lead author of research paper.

Veteran medical scientist Peter Parsons said fieldwork with cancer-struck animals outside the laboratory increased his confidence that the drug would work on most tumour types — and in people.

QBiotics, the company established by Dr Gordon and Dr Reddell, both 54, says the drug destroyed all traces of tumour or shrank them by more than half in 78 per cent of the 344 companion animals treated by vets, including Ms Campbell.

Dr Gordon insists “it’s time, we need to get this into people’’.

For her, the clock is ticking in a personal sense. In addition to losing her sister to cancer, both her parents and grandparents died of a disease that will kill more than 44,000 Australians this year. “I have already lost loved ones. I’m sure that more of my family will present with cancer, as my sister did. I wasn’t ready for her. So I have some incentive, real incentive, to get this drug through.’’

MY EARLIER BLUSHWOOD TREE POSTINGS >> 

ONE    +   TWO   +  THREE

Beautiful_Russian_2_300_250

Henry Sapiecha

Ginger-derived nanoparticles attack the roots of inflammatory bowel disease

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

ginger-root image www.newcures.info

Ginger-derived nanoparticles have exhibited impressive therapeutic effects in mice

ginger-cancer-cure-treatment-team image www.newcures.info

Ginger has a long and rich history when it comes to improving our wellbeing. Its medical use can be traced back thousands of years as a natural remedy for things like diarrhea and upset stomachs, but still today the thick, knotted root continues to reveal some hidden talents. Researchers have taken fresh ginger and converted it into a nanoparticle that exhibits real potential to treat these kinds of symptoms in one of their more chronic forms, inflammatory bowel disease, and might even help fight cancer, too.

The discovery was the result of a collaboration between researchers at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Georgia State University. Based on previous research highlighting the anti-inflammatory properties of the plant, the team set out to further explore the potential for ginger to treat conditions relating to the digestive tract.

The research began with a fresh ginger root purchased at a farmer’s market, which the team ground up in a typical kitchen blender. But the process was a little more complicated from that point, with the team using super-high-speed centrifugation and ultrasonic dispersion to break the ginger apart into tiny particles, each measuring around 230 nanometers across.

These particles were administered orally to lab mice, where they were drawn to the colon and soaked up by cells in the lining of the intestines. This is the region where inflammatory bowel disease occurs, and the researchers observed that the particles reduced both short-term and long-term inflammation, and even prevented cancer that arises as a result.

Furthermore, the researchers found that the ginger-derived nanoparticles, or GDNPs, improved intestinal repair by increasing the survival and spread of cells making up the colon lining. At the same time, they hampered the production of proteins that give rise to inflammation and boosted those that fight it.

The team believes that these therapeutic effects come from the high amounts of fatty molecules, or lipids, in the particles, which are a consequence of the natural lipids found in the ginger plant. One of these lipids is phosphatidic acid, which plays an important role in the construction of cell membranes, but the researchers say that their particles also retain other important ginger compounds called 6-gingerol and 6-shogaol, which have been shown to fight oxidation, inflammation, and cancer.

The particles appeared to be non-toxic in the mice and the researchers say that in humans they may provide a more targeted treatment of the colon than simply delivering ginger as a herb or supplement. This more precise approach means it could be delivered in lower doses and therefore avoid unnecessary or unwanted side effects.

Among the challenges in turning these GDNPs into a drug, Didier Merlin, leader of the research team explains, is the need to pinpoint the precise mechanisms by which they produce these effects.

“To find the natural components that are responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of GDNPs, this will be an important step to develop GDNPs into a drug,” he tells New Atlas.

The research was published in the journal Biomaterials.

Source: Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Confirmed_Profile_1_300_250

Henry Sapiecha

Enlarged Prostate (BPH)Explained in pics Sketches & information guide

Sunday, July 10th, 2016

What is an Enlarged Prostate?

An enlarged prostate occurs when a man’s prostate gland slowly grows bigger as he ages. More than half of men over age 60 have this condition, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Some men have symptoms and others don’t. The exact causes are unknown, but one thing is sure: BPH is not cancer and it does not lead to cancer. The prostate sits below the bladder and produces fluid for semen.

diagram_of_prostate image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

Symptom: Frequent Need to Urinate

Do you have to pee more often these days? Especially at night, when you’re trying to sleep? That’s a common symptom of BPH. It happens when the growing prostate presses on the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of your body. The bladder has to contract more strongly to get urine out. As a result, the bladder may start to contract even when it only contains a little urine, which makes you get the urge to go more often.

diagram_of_enlarged_prostate image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

Symptom: Difficulty Urinating

With an enlarged prostate, it may take you longer to get the flow of urine going, and the flow may be weaker than it used to be. You may dribble urine or feel as if there’s still some inside even though you’re finished urinating. These symptoms happen because the pressure on the urethra makes it narrow, so your bladder must work harder to pass urine.

mens_room_photo image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

Symptom: Inability to Urinate

This can happen when advanced BPH blocks your urethra entirely — or as a result of a bladder infection. Bladder muscles also may become too weak to force urine out of the body. From any cause, it can lead to permanent kidney damage. You can prevent this by seeing your doctor as soon as you notice symptoms. If you suddenly can’t urinate, go to a hospital emergency room immediately.

narrow_urethra image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

Who Gets an Enlarged Prostate?

Most men get an enlarged prostate as they age. The prostate gland grows throughout most of a man’s life, first at puberty and then from about age 25 on. It usually doesn’t cause symptoms before the age of 40. But by age 85, up to 90% of men have symptoms. Only about a third of men with an enlarged prostate are bothered by symptoms.

grandad_with_balloon image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

What Causes the Prostate to Grow?

No one knows for sure. It is believed that different hormones such as testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and estrogen may play a role. It is also unclear why some men with BPH will have symptoms while others do not. Vasectomy and sex do not raise the risk of having BPH.

tree_rings image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

Getting Diagnosed Early

BPH symptoms can be similar to those of other conditions. If you have symptoms, it’s important to see your doctor, who can rule out other possible causes, such as an infection or cancer.

urograph_of_prostate image www.newcures.info

divider_rainbowspin

 

Home Remedies for Psoriasis

Saturday, January 16th, 2016

1…Lay It on Thick

woman_applying_lotion_image www.newcures.info

Looking for a way to ditch the itch? A heavy cream can be the answer. Try petroleum jelly or another thick moisturizer. It locks water into your skin to help it heal and reduce the redness.

red pill line

2…Apple Cider Vinegar for Your Scalp >> www.handyhomehints.com

apple_cider_vinegar_in_bottle_image www.newcures.info

It’s more than just a salad dressing. Put some on your head a few times a week — either full strength or mixed with water. It’s a recipe for relief when your scalp calls out “scratch me.”Rinse it off after it dries so you won’t get an irritation. And don’t use this stuff if your scalp is bleeding or cracked. The vinegar will make it feel like it’s burning.

red pill line

3…Get a Little Sun

african_american_woman_in_sun_image www.newcures.info

Spend some time in the great outdoors. The sun’s ultraviolet B rays can help fight your psoriasis.

But don’t overdo it! Stick to 5 or 10 minutes a day and use sunscreen on spots without psoriasis. Too much sun can raise your risk of skin cancer.

red pill line

4…”Season” Your Bath

scoop_of_epsom_salts-image www.newcures.info

Want to shed some scales and soothe your skin? Put Dead Sea or Epsom salts into a tub with warm water. Soak for about 15 minutes, and use a moisturizer when you’re done to seal the water in.

red pill line

4…Capsaicin  >> www.foodpassions.net

red_chilli_peppers_image www.newcures.info

It’s the ingredient that makes chili peppers hot, and it’s got a place in your bag of tricks.  Researchers say it can cut pain, inflammation, and redness. You’ll find it in over-the-counter creams.

But a note of caution: Some people say it gives them a burning feeling when they put it on their skin.

red pill line

5…Turmeric

turmeric_powder_capsules_images www.newcures.info

You might know it as the yellow herb that shows up in foods with a curry sauce. Studies show it may cut down your psoriasis flare-ups. You can try it as an ingredient in your meals or as a supplement.

red pill line

6…Tea Tree Oil

australian_tea_tree_leaves_image www.newcures.info

It comes from a plant that’s native to Australia, but you don’t have to go that far to get relief. Shampoos made with this oil may help with psoriasis on your scalp, though more research is needed.

red pill line

7…Soak in Oats

scoops_of_oats_in_spa_bath_image www.newcures.info

It’s a natural way to soothe your skin. Put some ground-up oats in your bath, sit back, and relax. Just make sure the water is warm, not hot, so you don’t irritate your skin.

red pill line

8…Meditation and Yoga

women_in_yoga_class_image www.newcures.info

Cut down your stress to shake off your symptoms. Meditation can help you take your psoriasis in stride.

Yoga is especially helpful if you have psoriatic arthritis, because it eases joint pain and increases your range of motion.

red pill line

9…Wrap It Up! >> www.handyhomehints.com

woman_wrapping_arm_in_clingwrap_image newcures.info

Put cream on your skin at bedtime and cover the area with plastic wrap. Then add a layer of tight clothing — like gloves or socks.The idea is to seal the moisturizer in overnight and let your skin absorb it.

red pill line

10…Omega-3 Fatty Acids  >> www.foodpassions.net

salmon_on_salad_image www.newcures.info

They fight inflammation, and you can find them in fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines. You can also buy fish oil supplements

But just how much they help with psoriasis isn’t so clear. Studies have mixed results, so get your doctor’s advice.

red pill line

11…Oregon Grape >> www.pythonjungle.com

oregon_grape_leaves-image www.newcures.info

The name’s a little misleading. It’s an evergreen plant, not really a grape. It’s shown some promise in studies.

The plant’s formal name is Mahonia aquifolium. Look for creams in which it’s 10% of the ingredients.

red pill line

12…Mediterranean Diet  >> www.foodpassions.net

mediterranean_salad_with_fish_image www.newcures.info

This eating plan puts the focus on fish, fruits and veggies, and whole grains. A small study shows it might make your symptoms less severe.

red pill line

13…Aloe Vera  >> www.sunblestproducts.com

aloe_vera_and_skin_cream_image www.newcures.infp

Studies suggest this plant can improve psoriasis. Get gel or cream with 0.5% aloe vera in it and put it on your skin.

But steer clear of tablets. There’s no evidence that they help.

WHY SETTLE FOR LESS THAN 100% PURE

arrow-green

GET 100% PURE ORGANIC ALOE VERA LEAF DIRECT HERE FROM AUSTRALIA

000

Henry Sapiecha

red pill line

 

 

HEALING QUALITIES OF PLANTS IN THE AMAZONIAN JUNGLE HIGHLIGHTED IN THE YOU TUBE VIDEO MOVIE

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

Published on Mar 20, 2015

The Sacred Science – Drama Documentary Adventure [USA] full film

Diabetes. Prostate cancer. Alcoholism. Parkinson’s diseases. Just a handful of many common illnesses that Western medicine has been inadequate in curing or treating. Witness the story of eight brave souls as they leave the developed world behind in search of deeper answers. Living in seclusion for one month in the heart of the Amazon jungle, these men and women take part in the powerful healing practices of Peru’s indigenous medicine men, working with centuries-old plant remedies and spiritual disciplines. In their most desperate hour, these patients are forced to confront not only their physical ailments, but their own spiritual and psychological barriers in the process. Five will return with real results, two will return disappointed, and one won’t come back at all.
Actors:
Directors:Nicholas J. Polizzi
Country:USA

MORE JUNGLE PLANTS HERE >> www.pythonjungle.com

ooo

Henry Sapiecha