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CAESALPINIA PULCHERRIMA L. – PRIDE OF BARBADOS. TRADITIONAL MEDICINAL PLANT OF THE SURINAMES

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

CAESALPINIA PULCHERRIMA L. – PRIDE OF BARBADOS

Caesalpinia Pulcherrima Synonym Poinciana pulcherrima, Poinciana bijuga.
Common name Pride of Barbados, dwarf poinciana, red bird of paradise, krere – krere, Barbados flower – fence, pearock flower, tabachin, tabaquin.
Family Caesalpinaceae and Fabaceae.

Overview

Pride of Barbados is a small evergreen perennial shrub or tree, from the West Indies, 10 – 15 feet high with alternate, bipinnate leaves. The stem and branches are armed with spines. The red, orange, yellow and pink flowers grow at the end of the prickly branches. This small, graceful tree flowers throughout the year and is a beautiful garden plant. Pride of Barbados has beautiful bowl – shaped flowers in the colors red, orange, orange – red and yellow. The yellow variety is often called yellow bird of paradise.

The fruits are legumes, 3 – 4″ long; when ripe they split open and release the brown bean. The variety of pride of Barbados with red flowers is also called red bird of paradise, while the yellow species is called phoenix bird of paradise. Closely related is the Yellow bird of paradise (Caesalpinnia gilliesii) which has yellow flowers with long red stamens.

*** Suriname’s traditional medicine The leaves are purgative and used against kidney stones, malarial fever and bronchitis.

**** Flavonoids isolated from this plant possess anti-inflammatory activities; the flavonoid of quercetin has antiviral activity. Pride of Barbados exhibit a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, particularly against Escherichia coli (enteropathogen), Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

**** The root and stem seem to be cytotoxic.(damages or destroys cancerous cells).

RELATED ITEMS

SEEDS OF THIS PLANT ARE AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE

MORE ON THIS PLANT >>HERE

www.sunblestproducts.com

Henry Sapiecha

Scientists Find Substance In Mangosteen Kills 99% Of Breast & other Cancer Cells In lab tests

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018

This is a follow up on an earlier posting on Mangosteen in this site.

Great news for mangosteen lovers and those following the quest to find novel anti-cancer medicines derived from plants! We just received this report from our friends over at The Eden Prescription: In a new study published in Molecular Cancer (an open-access, peer-reviewed journal) alpha-mangostin, a substance derived from mangosteen pericarp, was shown to kill up to 99% of human breast cancer cells in vitro.*

What was particularly interesting about this study was that the researchers gained a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action of the mangosteen-derived substance. Alpha-mangostin was reported to block Fatty Acid Synthase – which disrupts the cancer cells’ ability to make fatty acids – without which they die. [1]

It appears that numerous cancer cell types require Fatty Acid Synthase for their survival, which may be the reason why mangostin has received much attention recently; it has also been found deadly also to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) is an amazing, delicious tropical fruit – one of my favorites in fact – and was originally native to Thailand. Don’t be fooled by the name, it does not look or taste like a mango. Mangosteen has a thick, pithy casing (pericarp) which is easily broken or cut open to reveal the white, fleshy part inside that is eaten. Mangosteen is also considered potentially valuable with weight loss, inflammation, heart disease and diabetes! However it is the pericarp that may have the strongest medicinal qualities. For centuries, people in Southeast Asia have used dried mangosteen pericarp as antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antipyretic, analgesic, and as a treatment for rashes. [2]

Tests like the study mentioned are the first step in the development and study of new medicines. It’s a long way before we can say for certain that mangosteen will have a direct anti-cancer action in humans – and in this study the beneficial substance was in the pericarp (the pithy case). However there have now been several promising studies on mangosteen extracts – including a 2013 study in which alpha-mangostin significantly suppressed tumor growth and reduced lymph node metastasis in mammary cancer in mice; leading researchers to conclude that “Mangosteen extracts appear to, in fact, have chemopreventive qualities and might prove useful as adjunctive and/or complementary alternative treatments in human breast cancer.” [2]

Mangosteen pericarp is available in supplement form.

* “In vitro” (literally “in glass”) is a scientific term used to denote that the test was done on isolated cell cultures in laboratory glassware, as opposed to in living creatures (“In vivo”).

www.sunblestproducts.com

Henry Sapiecha

The Tropical Fruit Mangosteen has been found deadly to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Sunday, January 21st, 2018

Great news for mangosteen lovers and those following the quest to find novel anti-cancer medicines derived from plants! We just received this report from our friends over at The Eden Prescription: In a new study published in Molecular Cancer (an open-access, peer-reviewed journal) alpha-mangostin, a substance derived from mangosteen pericarp, was proven to kill up to 99% of human breast cancer cells in vitro.*

What was particularly interesting about this study was that the researchers gained a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action of the mangosteen-derived substance. Alpha-mangostin was reported to block Fatty Acid Synthase – which supposedly disrupts the cancer cells’ ability to make fatty acids – without which they die.

It appears that numerous cancer cell types require Fatty Acid Synthase for their survival, which may be the reason why mangostin has received much attention recently; it has also been found deadly also to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) is an amazing, delicious tropical fruit – one of my favorites in fact – and was originally native to Thailand. Don’t be fooled by the name, it does not look or taste like a mango. Mangosteen has a thick, pithy casing (pericarp) which is easily broken or cut open to reveal the white, fleshy part inside that is eaten. Mangosteen is also considered potentially valuable with weight loss, inflammation, heart disease and diabetes! However it is the pericarp that may have the strongest medicinal qualities. For centuries, people in Southeast Asia have used dried mangosteen pericarp as antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antipyretic, analgesic, and as a treatment for rashes. [2]

Tests like the study mentioned are the first step in the development and study of new medicines. It’s a long way before we can say for certain that mangosteen will have a direct anti-cancer action in humans – and in this study the beneficial substance was in the pericarp (the pithy case). However there have now been several promising studies on mangosteen extracts – including a 2013 study in which alpha-mangostin significantly suppressed tumor growth and reduced lymph node metastasis in mammary cancer in mice; leading researchers to conclude that “Mangosteen extracts appear to, in fact, have chemopreventive qualities and might prove useful as adjunctive and/or complementary alternative treatments in human breast cancer.” [2]

Mangosteen pericarp is available in supplement form.

* “In vitro” (literally “in glass”) is a scientific term used to denote that the test was done on isolated cell cultures in laboratory glassware, as opposed to in living creatures (“In vivo”).

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Turmeric could Be The World’s Most Important Herb.600 reasons why.PLEASE SHARE.

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This article was supplied by herbs-info.com

We found a simply astonishing page all about Turmeric and had to share! I honestly think it is one of the best pages about a herb I have ever seen (and I’ve seen a fair number!) The link is after our commentary.

There are several things that are amazing about the page we discovered. First – of course – the fact that there is scientific research to support the notion that turmeric may be beneficial for a staggering 600+ conditions. It is one of the world’s most studied items for medicinal potential, with over 4000 scientific studies being recorded overall.

Then there is the fact that the mighty turmeric has been in use for over 6000 years, with an incredible safety record. Note also, the effects of turmeric have been found by scientists to be greatly enhanced when it is taken in combination with black pepper (see our report here – Substance In Black Pepper Increases Bioavailability Of Beneficial Turmeric Compounds by 2000% )

Even more amazing is the way the article weaves a crystal-clear narrative that exposes the farce behind the fact that the modern medical world will perhaps never approve turmeric “officially” for medical use. It explains clearly that “proof” is effectively only purchased by those with very deep pockets (802 million dollars on average is the cost for obtaining a new drug approval). [1] The situation is a complete joke. Turmeric is clearly and obviously one of the most benign and beneficial things in the known universe.

But most amazing of all, to me, was the comment from the man who states calmly that he is one of the world’s longest survivors of the kidney transplant operation (34 years since the op, the world record is 40 years) and he takes capsules of turmeric (and other herbs) daily. Truly inspiring stuff.

The original article is fantastic, electrifying even – and we encourage you to share this article www.newcures.info  far and wide. Here’s the link: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/600-reasons-turmeric-may-be-worlds-most-important-herb

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

HUGE LIST OF HERBS USED FOR DISEASE TREATMENTS CURES & BENEFITS-SHARE

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This information has been supplied by herbs-info.com

List Of Herbs

On this page you will find our alphabetical list of 150+ 189 herbs! Every herb in our list has its own dedicated page on this site – with pictures and very detailed info! Follow the links to learn more about each herb. The goal of the individual herbs’ pages is to gather information about the plant in one place, so that anyone researching it can have quick access to information.

Please bookmark this page so that you can use it as a “quick lookup” when you want to learn all about a herb. You can also share our image on Facebook and Pinterest. Each herb page follows a similar format – starting with names for the herb in different languages, then giving background and history, common and traditional uses of the herb, scientific research, esoteric uses and safety notes.

Our method of organization intentionally follows the style of the old herbals, which listed the plants in alphabetical order and often compiled the writings of other herbalists from past times. There is much material to work through and so this list is continuing to expand. Ok, here is the list!

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The Herbs:There are many more to yet come.

Agrimony | Ajwain | Alfalfa | Alkanet | Allspice | Aloe Vera | Althaea Officinalis (Marsh Mallow) | Amla | Angelica | Angostura | Anise | Arabian Jasmine | Arnica | Arrach | Artemisia | Asafoetida | Ashwagandha | Bacopa Monnieri | Bashful Mimosa | Basil | Bay Laurel | Bean | Bears Breech | Belladonna | Benzoin | Bergamot | Betony | Bilberry | Bitter Melon | Black Pepper | Blackberry Bush | Blumea Camphor | Boneset | Borage | Brooklime | Bryony | Bugle | Burdock | Butterbur | Cacao | Cajeput | Calendula | Canella | Capers | Cardamom | Carob Tree | Cascara Sagrada | Cascarilla | Catechu | Catnip | Cat’s Whiskers | Catsfoot | Cayenne | Cedron | Celery | Centory | Chamomile | Cheken | Chervil | Chinese Honeysuckle | Chives | Cilantro | Cinnamon | Clavo Huasca | Clove | Coltsfoot | Comfrey | Contrayerba | Copal | Cordyceps | Cumin | Daffodil | Damiana | Dandelion | Deadly Nightshade | Dill | Dittany Of Crete | Dodder | Dragon’s Blood | Echinacea | Elder | Epazote | Female Peony | Fennel | Fenugreek | Feverfew | Five Leaved Chaste Tree | Flax | Frankincense | Galangal | Garlic | Gentian | Ginger | Gingko Biloba | Ginseng | Goat’s Rue | Goji | Golden Seal | Gotu Kola | Green Tea | Guarana | Guava | Hearts Ease | Heavenly Elixir | Hedge Nettle | Henna | Hibiscus | Hollyhocks | Holy Basil | Holy Basil | Honeysuckle | Hops | Horny Goat Weed | Horseradish | Horsetail | Hyacinth | Indian Laurel | Jew’s Mallow | Juniper | Kava | Ladies Mantle | Lady’s Thistle | Lavender | Lead Tree | Lemon Balm | Lemongrass | Lesser Calamint | Licorice | Lily of the Valley | Male Satyrion | Marjoram | Milk Thistle | Moringa | Mountain Apple | Mugwort | Mullein | Neem | Nelumbo Nucifera | Nutmeg | Nymphaea Caerulea | Onion | Oregano | Orris Root | Paprika | Parsley | Passion Flower | Patchouli | Pepper Elder | Pimiento Pepper | Plantain | Primrose | Queen’s Flower | Red Clover | Reishi | Rhubarb | Ringworm Bush | Rooibos | Rosemary | Rue | Saffron | Sage | Savory | Saw Palmetto | Seaweed | Senna | Slippery Elm | Snake Needle Grass | Snakeweed | Soapnuts | Solomon’s Seal | Spearmint | Spiny Sapindus | St. John’s Wort | St Thomas Bean | Star Anise | Starfruit | Stinging Nettle | Sumac | Sweetsop | Tamarind | Tarragon | Tea | Thyme | Turmeric | Uva-Ursi | Valerian | Vanilla | Vervain | Water Hyssop | Wild Oregano | Wild Tea | Witch Hazel | Yarrow | Yerba Mate |

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

How an Australian man poisoned himself with apricot kernel extract

Monday, September 18th, 2017

A study reveals how a Australian [Victoria] man poisoned himself after taking home-made apricot kernel extract and a fruit kernel supplement for five years.

A Victorian man who gave himself cyanide poisoning from an apricot kernel extract highlights the dangers of some supplementary medicines, doctors say.

The 67-year-old was found to have 25 times the acceptable level of cyanide in his blood following routine surgery in 2015, a study published in the BMJ medical journal reveals.

He told doctors he’d taken two teaspoons of home-made apricot kernel extract and three Novodalin, or herbal fruit kernel supplement tablets, daily for five years.

The study’s lead author and anaesthetist at Melbourne’s the Alfred Hospital, Dr Alex Konstantatos, said this added up to 17.32mg of cyanide a day.

Cyanide interfers with the body’s ability to use oxygen and is marketed for cancer prevention but there’s no proof of this, he said.

“(The patient) believed very strongly that the kernel extract was going to prevent a cancer … from coming back,” Dr Konstantatos said.

“It’s not known what the effect of having a level of cyanide that’s not enough to kill you suddenly, but (is) still quite high – we don’t know what the long-term effects of it are.”

The patient continued to take the extract and supplement until recently, when he was blocked from buying raw apricot kernels or importing the tablets.

But Dr Konstantatos said his case highlighted a broader problem with these kinds of supplements.

“We went to all the trouble to measure it, confirm it and to publish the study to show that this gentleman’s probably just the tip of the iceberg, he said

“People who take medicines like this, in this unregulated way, do not know how much, exactly, they’re taking.

“That’s exactly what makes it so dangerous.”

Henry Sapiecha

SOME GREAT THINGS TO SAY ABOUT TUMERIC TO FIX PAIN & CURE DISEASES

Saturday, September 16th, 2017

Turmeric is one of the world’s most revered spices. Its praises are sung from the rooftops by herbalists. Entire books have been written extolling its magnificent virtues. Revered in the orient for centuries if not millennia, it has even been called “the world’s most healing spice” and hundreds of scientific papers and other reports have been published attesting to its healing benefits for all manner of conditions including cancer, ulcers, arthritis, alzheimers, cystic fibrosis, hemorrhoids, arteriosclerosis, inflammation and liver diseases.

As you might expect, we have some pages focusing on turmeric and here are some of them:
http://www.herbs-info.com/turmeric.html – our full page including herbal uses, history, claimed health benefits and scientific reports.
600 Reasons Turmeric May Be The World’s Most Important Herb
Top 10 Anti-Inflammatory Herbs

What’s the best way to use turmeric? Essentially, the way that is typically suggested is to simply incorporate it into the diet – using up to 4 grams per day. The taste is strange and unique – difficult to describe. It is not particularly fiery in the manner of for example cayenne or ginger, and personally I really like it, though it may take some getting used to. The best possible way to eat it – as with so many things – is fresh, raw, organic. I do this and simply chop or grate some very small pieces and sprinkle them on top of salads; or (my favorite) on top of my morning eggs on toast – along with organic avocado, heirloom tomato, olives and raw pumpkin seeds… ?

Fresh organic turmeric may prove to be a challenge to find (though worth the effort) and so you could resort to the powdered version (typically found in with all the other spices at the supermarket). It is also possible to obtain turmeric in capsule form, so that you can get it down you in a regulated manner without worrying about the bizarre taste or the fact that the amount of powder for optimum health benefits may be more than that which you might sprinkle on to your recipe otherwise.

Another thing to note about turmeric (powder or whole fresh) – it will stain plates, fingertips and work surfaces a bright saffron-yellow color! This will generally come out after a few washes but it’s not a good look to give guests stained plates – and so you may wish to designate specific kitchen utensils / tableware for your turmeric experiments. ? I would also counsel against chopping turmeric directly on a marble countertop!

Close up turmeric powder on grunge wooden background.

TUMERIC PAIN RELIEF TEA BELOW

Ok here’s the link to the full turmeric tea tutorial: http://knowledgeweighsnothing.com/how-to-make-turmeric-pain-relief-tea/

Henry Sapiecha

 

The Tree of Life plant Moringa Oleifera Kills 97% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells in Vitro

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

We just discovered an amazing report about Moringa, courtesy of our friends over at The Eden Prescription. In 2013 scientists reported in a paper published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A peer-reviewed, open access journal) that A hot-water extract of the leaves of Moringa Oleifera killed up to 97% of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1) after 72 hours in lab tests. Moringa leaf extract inhibited the growth of all pancreatic cell lines tested. [1]

Pancreatic cancer is very serious, one of the worst. Fewer than 6% patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas live five years after diagnosis. The typical treatment is currently chemotherapy.

Called the “miracle tree” on account of its many virtues, Moringa is very well known in India, parts of Africa, the Philippines and several other countries, yet it is relatively unknown in countries such as the USA. However it seems from the current buzz around it that it may well soon experience a rise to new popularity. It has a long history of use in traditional medicine due to its properties as an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, antidepressant, anti-diabetes, pain and fever reducer and even asthma treatment. We’ve dedicated a full page on our site to a detailed herbal report on the amazing Moringa and those interested in herbalism would do well to investigate this plant.

It also contains numerous powerful anti-cancer compounds such as kaempferol, rhamnetin and isoquercetin. Now, researchers are discovering that Moringa has anti-cancer potential with positive results so far against ovarian cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma in lab tests. A list of these studies can be seen on Pubmed here.

Please note that it’s a long way before Moringa can be claimed as a cancer cure, but this kind of study is important because it indicates the potential for a starting point for a medicine of the future. It’s especially interesting because Moringa is already in common use – not only in herbalism but in a wide variety of other applications.

Moringa is now extensively cultivated throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, but the largest Moringa crop in the world is produced by India – where it grows natively. It’s fascinating to note that may be one reason why the death rate from pancreatic cancer in India is a stunning 84% lower than in the United States!

**Moringa plants,material & seeds are available HERE.

Note – This article is not medical advice nor a substitute for consultation with a medical professional.

Note 2 – “In Vitro” literally means “In Glassware” and is the Latin expression to denote that the tests were done on cell cultures in a lab, as opposed to “In Vivo” which means tested on living creatures. Such studies indicate preliminary success but much more research will be needed to “prove” efficacy in humans. Though the huge disparity in pancreatic cancer rates in India is highly encouraging.

Check out our full “herbal page” on Moringa – tons of detailed information for those wishing to study this plant in depth: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Please check out The Eden Prescription for more reports on the cutting edge science being done investigating the medicinal properties of herbs!

References:

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957955

Moringa oleifera and the hot water infusions derived from its flowers, roots, leaves, seeds, and bark were also determined to possess antispasmodic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the seed infusion appears to suppress the contraction induced by acetylcholine in this study (ED50 of 65.6 mg/mL) and the edema stimulated by carrageenan at 1000 mg/kg. Diuretic activity was noted at a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. Some of these cited biological properties were also noted in the roots. [24]

Moringa – Active Compounds

One thing that Moringa truly and clearly has under its belt is its being a rich and good source – not to mention affordable and readily accessible – of vital minerals and vitamins, protein, β-carotene, amino acids, and various phenolics. Zeatin, quercetin, β-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid, and kaempferol can also be isolated from Moringa. [25] Upon a comprehensive analysis of Moringa glucosinolates and phenolics (including flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and cinnamates), Bennett et al. (2003) found that:

The seeds contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate at high concentrations.

The roots have high concentrations of 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and benzyl glucosinolate.

The leaves contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and three monoacetyl isomers of this glucosinolate; quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-(6′ ‘-malonyl-glucoside); kaempferol-3-O-glucoside and kaempferol-3-O-(6’ ‘-malonyl-glucoside) in lower amounts; and 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid.

The bark contains 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate. [24]

Names of Moringa, past and present

English: Moringa, Horseradish Tree, Tree Of Life, Moringa Tree of Paradise, Moringa the Never Die Tree, Drumstick Tree, Ben Oil Tree, Ben Tree
Latin (scientific nomenclature): Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Hyperanthera moringa (archaic)
Tamil: Murungai / Murungai Maram
Mandarin: la mu
Cantonese: lat mok (lit. ‘spicy wood’)
Filipino: malunggay / kamungay
Hindi / Indian: munaga / shajna
Spanish: palo de aceite / libertad
French: ben olifiere
Ayurvedic: Shigru / Shobhanjana
Hindi: Sahjan
Punjabi: Surajan
Konkani: Mhasanga Saang
Telugu: Munagachettu

Morniga – General Information

Moringa is a genus of 13 species of tropical and subtropical plants. The most widely known of these, and the subject of this article, is Moringa oleifera – a tree native to northwestern India. Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to as just “Moringa”, grows fast in a variety of climates and is cultivated in many regions because it can grow in poor or even some barren soils. Much of the plant is edible. The leaves are nutritious and are used as food for people and feed for livestock. [1]

The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. [2]

The moringa tree, when left to its own devices, usually grows as much as ten metres, although when cultivated for its leaves, seed pods (aka ‘drumsticks’), seeds, or flowers it is usually trimmed and maintained at an easily reachable length of one to three metres tall to allow for easier harvesting of its constituent parts.

Proponents of Moringa oleifera sing its praises. It has been described as “one of the most useful plants that exists” – owing to its unusual combination of high nutritional value, medicinal properties, fast growing and ability to thrive in arid environments. The leaves are rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron.

One of the reasons the Moringa tree can thrive in arid regions is that it has a long taproot – which also makes it valuable against soil erosion. [3] The main products made from the plant are edible seed oil, tea leaves and animal feed. The seed kernels are also used by the French perfume manufacturing industry. [4] The Moringa tree is now widely cultivated in Africa, Sri Lanka, India, Central and South America, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other food may be scarce. [5]

Moringa oleifera is listed in the AHPA’s “Herbs of Commerce”, p98. [6]

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References & Further Reading

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[3] http://www.miracletrees.org

[4] http://web.archive.org/web/20090906184503/http://www.shaebia.org/artman/publish/article_5934.shtml

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[6] “Herbs of Commerce” (AHPA) (2000 edition) – Michael McGuffin, John T. Kartesz, Albert Y Leung, Arthur O. Tucker p.98

[7] http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Moringa.html

[8] http://books.google.com/books?id=ZUw-AAAAcAAJ

[9] http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa

[10] http://web.archive.org/web/20120821200349/http://moringafact.com/health-benefit-of-moringa-leaves-and-moringa-seeds/

[11] http://edlagman.com/moringa/moringa-health-benefits.htm

[12] http://leafpower.wordpress.com/moringa-benefits/

[13] http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/201276/moringa-malunggay-philippines#.ULEkU-Tqk8o

[14] http://www.sooperarticles.com/food-drinks-articles/health-benefits-recipe-ben-oil-tree-malunggay-798017.html

[15] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-oil.php

[16] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-benefits.php

[17] http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95883:the-nutritional-and-healing-benefits-of-moringa&catid=105: saturday-magazine&Itemid=566

[18] http://books.google.com/books?id=tR6gAAAAMAAJ (p.123)

[19] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19666102

[20] Anwar F., Latif S., Ashraf M., & Gilani A. H. (2007). Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytotherapy Research, 21(1): 17–25. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17089328/

[21] Mbikay M. (2012). Therapeutic potential of Moringa oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia: A review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3:24. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00024. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290775/

[22] Ndong M., Uehara M., Katsumata S., & Suzuki K. (2007). Effects of oral administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar rats. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 40(3): 229–233. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.40.229. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398501/

[23] Jaiswal D., Kumar Rai P., Kumar A., Mehta S., & Watal G. (2009).Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3): 392–396. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.036. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501271/

[24] Cáceres A., Saravia A., Rizzo S., Zabala L., De Leon E., & Nave F. (1992).Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2: Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diuretic activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 36(3): 233–237. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1434682/

[25] Bennett R. N. et al. (2003).Profiling glucosinolates and phenolics in vegetative and reproductive tissues of the multi-purpose trees Moringa oleifera L. (horseradish tree) and Moringa stenopetala L. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(12): 3546–3553. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12769522/

*** MORINGA PLANTS-SEEDS & MATERIAL AVAILABLE HERE

CONTENT FOR THIS ARTICLE WAS OBTAINED FROM THE GREAT SITE BELOW

http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Henry Sapiecha

Do Not Throw Away The Healthiest Part Of Your Avocado

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

It’s well known that the avocado is great source of healthy fats as well as other super nutrients. But what you may now know is that you’ve been throwing away the healthiest part of your avocado…. the stone.

The Avocado’s Inside Secret

Did you know that the seed holds 70% of the avocado’s antioxidants! And yet, for years, we’ve been tossing it into the trash without a second thought. Also, just as green tea has been praised for its cancer fighting polyphenols, this hard, round avocado super-ball has been given the same distinguished praise. [1]

There’s more: it turns out that avocado seeds also have just as much beneficial soluble fiber as other top rated fiber foods. Along with the soluble fiber, the antioxidants work in the digestive tract to promote optimal digestive health as well as suppress tumor growth. The healthy oils found in the heart of this fruit are a great resource for our skin. Its natural fat helps to keep skin and hair look young, smooth, and supple. In South America, people use the seed as a herbal remedy to treat gastrointestinal tract problems. It has also been used for inflammation and diarrhea. [2]

But How To Eat The Seed…?

It’s understandable why people discard the stone: It’s super hard. My dental plan would probably not cover the cost to repair my teeth after gnawing on a bowling ball-like seed, no matter what the health benefits would be! So let me offer you the technique to access the health benefits of the avocado seed: Make it into powder.

Start by drying out the seed on a sunny window sill – or you can use a food dehydrator. After the avocado stone is thoroughly dry, chop(carefully!) the seed into four pieces. Then place the pieces in your food processor or blender and grind into a powder.

You can sprinkle the avocado seed powder directly on your food, your soups, salads, pastas, and anything else you would like. If you find the taste too bitter, I suggest adding it to a smoothie along with other fruits and veggies to mask its taste. One seed will give you enough powder for two smoothies. Another way to take in the goodness of the avocado seed is to make a tea. Simply place half of a seed in boiling water for 10 minutes or add one tablespoon of ground up seed powder to a cup of boiling water. [3]

Now that you know how powerful the avocado seed is, start collecting them and drying them out!

References:

[1] http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/most-people-are-throwing-healthiest-part-of-avocado-away-a6677211.html
[2] http://dailysuperfoodlove.com/4448/the-surprising-benefits-of-avocado-seeds/
[3] http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3257112/Avocado-SEED-makes-70-nutritional-benefits-know-eat-it.html

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Potent Plant powder power prevents malaria victims from dying

Monday, May 8th, 2017

So what is this plant?

Weathers has made several high-producing versions of the plant using tissue cultures  (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

When 18 malaria patients in the Congo failed to respond to conventional treatments and instead continued to head toward terminal status, doctors knew they had to act fast – and try something different. So instead of turning to more synthetic drugs, they turned instead to nature and found a solution that delivered remarkable results.

The patients were first treated with the regimen described by the World Health Organization (WHO): artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This drug combines an extract from a plant known as Artemisia annua, with other drugs that launch a multi-pronged attack on the malaria parasite. But just as is the case with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the malaria parasite is evolving to resist the drugs designed to kill it. In fact, according to the WHO, three of the five malarial parasites that infect humans have shown drug resistance.

As the patients continued to decline, with one five-year-old even entering into a coma, the doctors administered a drug called artesunate intravenously, which is the preferred course of action when treating severe malaria. The treatment didn’t work.

Finally, doctors turned to the Artemisia annua plant itself. Also called sweet wormwood or sweet Annie, the plant is the source of the chemical artemisinin, which is used in ACT therapy. The plant has been used since ancient times in Chinese medicine to treat fevers, although this bit of knowledge was lost until 1970 when the Chinese Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergency Treatments (340 AD) was rediscovered. In 1971 it was found that extracts from the plant could fight malaria in primates.

Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute began researching Artemisia annua over 25 years ago. Along with postdoctoral fellow Melissa Towler, Weathers created a pill made from nothing more than the dried and powdered leaves of the plant. When the pills were given to the 18 dying patients over the course of five days, all of them completely recovered, with no trace of the malaria parasite remaining in their blood.

“These 18 patients were dying,” Weathers said. “So to see 100 percent recover, even the child who had lapsed into a coma, was just amazing. It’s a small study, but the results are powerful.”

Weathers had previously shown that the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant (DLA) could deliver 40 times more Artemisia annua to the blood than extracts of the plant alone. In a later experiment, she showed that not only could the leaves beat drug-resistant bacteria in mice, but that after passing the malaria parasite through 49 generations of mice, the parasite still showed no resistance to the plant.

While the exact mechanism through which DLA operates is unclear, Weathers says it’s likely due to the intricate chemical dance that occurs between the phytochemicals in the leaves.

Weathers with the Artemisia plant (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

Because the drug is inexpensive and relatively simply to produce, Weathers also says that it could be a source of industry for people living in the areas where malaria is a problem, such as Ghana, Kenya and Malawi where it was recently announced that the first malaria vaccines will be deployed. “This simple technology can be owned, operated, and distributed by Africans for Africans,” said Weathers, who has already established a supply chain on the continent for the leaves using local producers.

Weathers also said that further research into DLA could lead to effective ways to combat other maladies.

“We have done a lot of work to understand the biochemistry of these compounds, which include a number of flavonoids and terpenes, so we can better understand the role they play in the pharmacological activity of the dried leaves,” Weathers said. “The more we learn, the more excited we become about the potential for DLA to be the medication of choice for combatting malaria worldwide. Artemisia annua is known to be efficacious against a range of other diseases, including other tropical maladies and certain cancers, so in our lab we are already at work investigating the effectiveness of DLA with other diseases.”

The results of the case in the Congo have been described in the journal Phytomedicine. You can hear more from Weathers in the video below.

Source: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

www.pythonjungle.com

Henry Sapiecha