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DO THESE THINGS CAUSE CANCERS?

Saturday, January 16th, 2016

1…Artificial Sweeteners

sugar_and_artificial_sweeteners_in_bowl_image www.newcures.info

Despite all the talk — and chain emails — there’s no proof that these sugar stand-ins raise your risk of cancer. Saccharine did cause cancer in rats, but their bodies react to it differently than ours, researchers say. There hasn’t been a cancer warning label on it since 2000. A study of aspartame in people found no link either.

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2…X-rays

dental_xrays_front_image www.newcures.info

Your dentist covers you in a lead blanket for a reason. Even low doses of X-rays raise your chances of getting cancer, but only by a small amount. In general, the higher the dose of radiation, the more the risk. But there’s no amount of this kind of radiation that’s totally safe. That’s why the EPA limits how much you can get.

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3…Cell Phones  >>> www.freephonelink.net

businessman_using_hands_free_cell_phone_image www.newcures.info

This gadget, which you keep near all the time, gives off the same type of energy as microwave ovens. So far, it hasn’t been linked to cancer, but more research is needed. Just to be safe:

  • Save it for short chats or when there’s no landline.
  • Use a hands-free device.

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3…Meat  >>> www.foodpassions.net

sausages_on_a_grill_image www.newcures.info

Whether it’s processed or red, you need less of it in your life. Just one hot dog a day could boost your chances of getting colon cancer.  Luncheon meats, cold cuts, and hot dogs all have preservatives called nitrites, which cause cancer. Smoking meats or cooking them at a high temperature creates compounds called PAHs. Studies are under way to see how they affect people.

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4…Bottled Water  >> www.h2o-water.com

asian_woman_drinking_bottled_water_outdoors_image www.newcures.info

If your bottle is clear plastic, it probably has bisphenol A (BPA). This chemical is used in food and drink containers, dental sealants, and other products. Does it cause cancer? The FDA says no, BPA is safe at current levels found in foods. If you’re concerned, avoid canned foods and store chow and drinks in clear plastic. For hot food, use glass or steel instead.

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5…Sex >>> www.club-libido.com & >>>> www.clublibido.com.au

man_opening_condom_wrapper_image www.newcures.info

It’s true. Human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted infection, can cause cervical and other cancers. Most adults who have sex will get this virus at some point. But they won’t all get cancer. Most of the time, HPV goes away by itself. To lower your risk:

  • Get vaccinated if you’re a female aged 11-26 or a male aged 11-21.
  • Use condoms during sex.
  • Have sex with only one partner.

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6…Dental Fillings >> www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

amalgam_filling_in_tooth_image www.newcures.info

Don’t call the dentist to have your metal filings removed and replaced. Experts say your current ones are safe. Studies have found no link between fillings with mercury and cancer — or any other disease.

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7…Coffee >> www.foodpassions.net

asian_woman_drinking_coffee_image www.newcures.info

If you feel your day doesn’t really start until you’ve had a shot of caffeine, you’ll love this. New research shows that drinking moderate amounts of coffee (around four cups daily) lessens the risk of some types of cancer, among them skin, liver, and colon.

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8…Deodorant and Antiperspirant

woman_applying_deodorant_image www.newcures.info

Scientists say more research is needed to know for sure if these products boost the odds of breast cancer. They have different jobs — deodorant blocks the smell and antiperspirant stops sweat. Many use chemicals that act like the hormone estrogen, which causes cancer cells to grow. These include benzylparaben, butylparaben, methylparaben, and propylparaben.

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9…Fluoride  >> www.h2o-water.com    >> www.perfectwhiteteeth.net

closeup_of_green_mouthwash_image www.newcures.info

This compound is found in water and other drinks and in food, toothpastes, and mouth rinses. Though many studies have looked for links between it and cancer, most researchers says there’s no strong tie. If you’re worried about it, you can ask the Environmental Protection Agency how much is in your drinking water. If it’s high, switch to bottled spring water, which usually has the least.

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10…Household Products  >> www.handyhomehints.com

colorful_paint_can_lids_and_roller_image www.newcures.info

Many pesticides, paints, varnishes, and waxes give off gases known as volatile organic compounds  (VOCs). So do some cleaning, cosmetic, automotive, and hobby products. These gases have been linked to cancer in humans and animals. To cut your risk choose products labeled low-VOC and biodegradable when possible. Avoid items labeled as:

  • Danger/Poison
  • Corrosive
  • Severely Irritating
  • Highly Flammable
  • Highly Combustible
  • Strong Sensitizer

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11..Power Lines >> www.energy-options.info

power_lines_image www.newcures.info

Anything that makes, sends, or uses electricity gives off extremely low frequency (ELF) radiation. There’s no proof that it causes cancer. Still, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences says there’s cause for “limited concern.” To be safe, stay at least an arm’s length away from electrical devices. If you live close to a power line and you’re worried, get a gizmo called a gaussmeter. You can use it to measure the ELF fields near you.

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12…Pollution

shanghai_skyline_smog_image www.newcures.info

Air pollution causes over 220,000 lung cancer deaths worldwide a year (most of them in Asia). There’s also a link between dirty air and a higher risk of bladder cancer. But the odds for any one person are low. To cut your chances, listen to local smog alerts. Try to stay inside on days when the air quality is poor.

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ooo

Henry Sapiecha

CIGARETTES,CHINA AND HEAVY METALS

Sunday, October 10th, 2010

High amounts of heavy metals found in China tobacco


By Tan Ee LynPosted 2010/10/07 at 7:55 am EDT

HONG KONG, Oct. 7, 2010 (Reuters) — Some Chinese cigarettes contain amounts of lead, arsenic and cadmium that are three times higher than levels found in Canadian cigarettes, a study has found.


While consuming such heavy metals is widely known to be harmful to health, there is little research done so far about their impact when inhaled into the body.

The researchers, who published their findings in the journal Tobacco Control on Thursday, said more investigation was needed.

“While the per-stick levels of metals are what we measured, the real issue is repeated exposure. Smokers don’t smoke just one cigarette, but 20 or so a day every day for years because cigarettes are addictive,” wrote lead author Richard O’Connor of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York.

“These metals get into smokers along with a cocktail of other toxicants. The effect of cumulative exposure to multiple toxicants, including metals, is the public health question that needs to be sorted out.”

The researchers used Canadian cigarettes for comparison in their study because Canadian manufacturers and importers are required to test for metals content in tobacco, and Health Canada, the country’s public health agency, recently released data concerning this.

China has more than 320 million smokers and a million Chinese in the country die each year from tobacco-related illnesses. Smoking has been causally linked to hypertension, stroke, diabetes, cancer, heart and respiratory diseases, among others.

China has the world’s largest smoking population and is also the biggest producer of tobacco, manufacturing 2.16 trillion cigarettes in 2007, according to the Tobacco Atlas.

O’Connor and colleagues analyzed 78 varieties of popular Chinese cigarette brands and found significantly elevated levels of heavy metals, with some containing three times the levels of lead, cadmium and arsenic compared with Canadian cigarettes.

“The higher yields of cadmium and lead in cigarettes manufactured in China are worrisome given current smoking prevalence in China and China National Tobacco Company’s export ambitions,” the researchers wrote in their paper.

A member of the team, Geoffrey Fong from the University of Waterloo in Canada, said the heavy metals content was due to contaminated soil.

“Tobacco like other crops absorbs minerals and other things from the soil, so if the soil has cadium, lead or arsenic, they will be absorbed into the tobacco,” Fong said.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

MERCURY AND ITS DANGER TO MANKIND IN THE OCEANS OF THE WORLD

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

Why Mercury Is

More Dangerous in Oceans

Science (June 28, 2010) — Even though freshwater concentrations of mercury are far greater than those found in seawater, it’s the saltwater fish like tuna, mackerel and shark that end up posing a more serious health threat to humans who eat them.


The answer, according to Duke University researchers, is in the seawater itself.

The potentially harmful version of mercury — known as methylmercury — latches onto dissolved organic matter in freshwater, while it tends to latch onto chloride — the salt — in seawater, according to new a study by Heileen Hsu-Kim, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering.

“The most common ways nature turns methylmercury into a less toxic form is through sunlight,” Hsu-Kim said. “When it is attached to dissolved organic matter, like decayed plants or animal matter, sunlight more readily breaks down the methylmercury. However, in seawater, the methlymercury remains tightly bonded to the chloride, where sunlight does not degrade it as easily. In this form, methylmercury can then be ingested by marine animals.”

Methylmercury is a potent neurotoxin that can lead to kidney dysfunctions, neurological disorders and even death. In particular, fetuses exposed to methylmercury can suffer from these same disorders as well as impaired learning abilities. Because fish and shellfish have a natural tendency to store methylmercury in their organs, they are the leading source of mercury ingestion for humans.

“The exposure rate of mercury in the U.S. is quite high,” Hsu-Kim said. “A recent epidemiological survey found that up 8 percent of women had mercury levels higher than national guidelines. Since humans are on the top of the food chain, any mercury in our food accumulates in our body.”

The results of Hsu-Kim’s experiments, which have been published early online in the journal Nature Geoscience, suggest that scientists and policymakers should focus their efforts on the effects of mercury in the oceans, rather than freshwater.

Her research is supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Science.

In the past, most of the scientific studies of effects of mercury in the environment have focused on freshwater, because the technology had not advanced to the point where scientists could accurately measure the smaller concentrations of mercury found in seawater. Though the concentrations may be smaller in seawater, mercury accumulates more readily in the tissues of organisms that consume it.

“Because sunlight does not break it down in seawater, the lifetime of methlymercury is much longer in the marine environment,” Hsu-Kim said. “However, the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency do not distinguish between freshwater and seawater.”

Mercury enters the environment through many routes, but the primary sources are coal combustion, the refinement of gold and other non-ferrous metals, and volcanic eruptions. The air-borne mercury from these sources eventually lands on lakes or oceans and can remain in the water or sediments.

The key to the sun’s ability to break down methylmercury is a class of chemicals known as reactive oxygen species. These forms of oxygen are the biochemical equivalent of the bull in the china shop because of the way they break chemical bonds. One way these reactive oxygens are formed is by sunlight acting on oxygen molecules in the water.

“These reactive forms of oxygen are much more efficient in breaking the bonds within the methylmercury molecule,” Hsu-Kim said. “And if the methylmercury is bonded to organic matter instead of chloride, then the break down reaction is much faster.”

Tong Zhang, a Ph.D. candidate in Hsu-Kim’s laboratory, was first author on the paper.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

GOLD USED TO REMOVE TOXIC MERCURY FROM DRINKING WATER

Monday, June 21st, 2010

Is Your Water Safe?

Physical Chemists Devise Quick

Spectrometry-Based Mercury Test

August 1, 2006 — Physical chemists have created a new, cheap test to detect mercury, an element known to harm the brain, kidneys, heart, lungs and immune system. A gold nanorod absorbs mercury from a sample and, then and an optical spectrometer measures changes in the nanorod’s light absorption. The process, which takes less than 10 minutes, can test mercury concentrations in liquids, gases, or solids.


ORLANDO, Fla. — Mercury … It’s in the ground, in the air, and in our water! We even have a little bit in our bodies. That’s normal. But too much mercury could cause health problems. What’s in your water? New tests may help detect if something dangerous is coming out of your faucet.

Courtney Hylton and her 2-year-old daughter Jordan enjoy their afternoon tea parties. Even though it tastes just right, what’s in the water could hurt them both.

“I really want to know what’s in there that shouldn’t be there,” Courtney says.

According to chemist Andres Campiglia, mercury attacks the nervous system. Too much mercury in your body can cause injury to your brain, kidneys, heart, lungs and immune system.

For pregnant women like Courtney, too much mercury can be toxic to their unborn babies. That’s why she is having her water tested.

Using gold to remove mercury from drinking water

University of Central Florida chemists Eloy Hernández and Campiglia have created a new quick, cheap test to detect mercury by using a very unlikely source — pure gold. Water is mixed with a solution containing gold nanorods, or solid gold bars 2,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair. Gold absorbs mercury. Then, scientists use an optical spectrometer to measure the light soaked up by the nanorods and reveal how much mercury is present.

“The more reddish it becomes, the higher the concentration of mercury,” Hernández tells DBIS.

The entire process takes less than 10 minutes. Results read out on a computer.

Courtney and Jordan’s water was safe, so for them it’s another cup of tea — with a little milk — and no mercury.

This mercury test works on not only liquids, but also on gases and solids. Scientists believe it can also be used in a larger capacity to clean up water and power plants. It could be available to the public within a few years.

BACKGROUND: Chemists are using an unusual technique to detect mercury in your water: gold nanorods, two thousand times thinner than a human hair The gold absorbs the mercury while the researchers monitor changes in the amount of light through a hand-held device called an optical spectrometer. This process can be used to create water filters and reclaim contaminated water.

HOW MERCURY GETS INTO WATER: Mercury is found in many rocks including coal, which when burned, releases mercury into the environment. Coal-burning power plants are the largest human-caused source of mercury emissions to the air in the United States, accounting for over 40 percent of all domestic human-caused mercury emissions. The EPA has estimated that about one quarter of U.S. emissions from coal-burning power plants are deposited within the U.S. Burning hazardous wastes, producing chlorine, breaking mercury products, and spilling mercury, as well as the improper treatment and disposal of products or wastes containing mercury, can also release it into the environment. Current estimates are that less than half of all mercury within the U.S. comes from U.S. sources. Mercury in the air eventually settles into water or onto land where it can be washed into water.

TOXIC MERCURY: Also known as “quicksilver,” mercury is heavy, silver-like metal, and one of five elements that are liquid at or near room temperature. Mercury is a neurotoxin, so it affects the central nervous system, causing personality changes, nervousness, trembling and in extreme cases, dementia. If mercury vapor is inhaled, as much as 80 percent of it may enter the bloodstream.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha