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Australian not-for-profit group wins unprecedented FDA approval for blindness drug

Sunday, July 22nd, 2018

London: An Australian company has won unprecedented US approval for a new drug to treat the second most common preventable cause of blindness in the world.

In the process, Medicines Development for Global Health, based in Melbourne, became the first not-for-profit company in the world to register a medicine with the US Food and Drug Administration.

Mark Sullivan, managing director of Medicines Development for Global Health.

Photo: Supplied

The World Health Organisation has been calling for better treatments for river blindness for more than a decade, but because the medicine would be mostly used by those in poverty-stricken countries, there has been no financial incentive for drug companies to develop new treatments. The current treatment is 20 years old.

River blindness is caused by parasitic worms and spread by black flies. It affects the skin and eyes and is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa.

In a double-win for Medicines Development for Global Health, it has also won a highly sought after voucher designed to financially reward companies that develop drugs for neglected diseases.

Managing director Mark Sullivan said while FDA approval for the company’s drug, moxidectin, was a “momentous achievement” for any pharma company, it was “a particularly rare and exciting event” for those trying to treat neglected diseases.

The FDA gave its approval for the treatment, which is swallowed as a tablet, in June after the application was submitted in October 2017.

Mr Sullivan established the Melbourne-based not-for-profit company in 2005 with the sole purpose of filling the gap left by the big pharmaceutical companies by developing medicines that were based on need for treatment rather than the patients’ ability to afford them.

Medicines Development for Global Health has been working for five years on the development of the drug and is now planning to develop moxidectin as a new treatment for scabies, a common problem in Indigenous communities.

Priority review voucher

The company has also won a priority review voucher under a scheme set up in 2007 to create a financial incentive to reward drug makers willing to spend the time and money developing treatments for the some of the world’s most neglected diseases. The scheme creates a market for making new drugs that the private market was not filling itself.

Under the scheme, a company that wins a voucher gets a fast track through the FDA for consideration of its  next new drug,  even if it’s a treatment that would have a commercial return. This gives it a head-start over its rivals.

Crucially, a company can also on-sell the voucher to a bigger company willing to pay anywhere between $US100 million and $300 million for the right to almost halve the approval time.

Because Medicines Development for Global Health is a not-for-profit, its proceeds from drug sales and the voucher will be reinvested in the company to develop new drugs & medications for other neglected diseases.

“Our plan is to sell the voucher and use the funds to support further development of moxidectin for other neglected diseases but also to expand our portfolio into other medicines and vaccines,” Mr Sullivan said.

Professor David Ridely from Duke University authored the scheme and said Medicines Development for Global Health was a textbook example of how he envisaged the program would work.

“I’m delighted that the voucher program is playing a role in treating patients with river blindness, and one day eliminating the disease,” he said.

Mr Sullivan said the development of moxidectin could not have been possible without a $US13 million co-investment from the Global Health Investment Fund, which is the social impact investment fund initially put together by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

”We believe moxidectin may play a pivotal role in eventually eradicating river blindness, and look forward to working with MDGH and others in making this happen,” Curt LaBelle, managing partner at the investment fund, said.

Color-enhanced Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Onchocerca volvulus, image of a female worm with microfilaria. O. volvulus is a nematode that causes onchocerciasis, or “river blindness,” mostly in Africa. Long-term corneal inflammation, or keratitis, leads to thickening of the corneal stroma which ultimately leads to blindness.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved moxidectin for the treatment of onchocerciasis (river blindness) due to Onchocerca volvulus in patients ≥12 years of age.

Moxidectin, a macrocyclic lactone, is an anthelmintic drug that selectively binds to the parasite’s glutamate-gated chloride ion channels. It is active against O. volvulus microfilariae but it does not kill adult O. volvulus parasites. The tropical disease spreads from person to person via black flies that breed near rivers in South and Central America, sub-Saharan Africa and Yemen

RELATED LINKS
 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will develop cancer in their lifetimes. This saddening reality is made worse when it is acknowledged that modern methods of ‘treating’ the disease are often ineffective and only make the symptoms of the disease far worse. In fact, according to one Berkeley doctor, Dr. Hardin B. Jones, chemotherapy doesn’t work 97% of the time.

In the eye-opening video above, Dr. Hardin B. Jones, a former professor of medical physics and physiology at the University of California, Berkeley, discusses how ‘leading edge’ cancer treatment is a sham.

Studied life expectancy of patients for over 25 years

He has personally studied the life expectancy of patients for more than 25 years and has come to the conclusion that chemotherapy does more harm than good. The bone-chilling realization prompted Dr. Jones to speak out against the billion-dollar cancer industry.

“People who refused chemotherapy treatment live on average 12 and a half years longer than people who are undergoing chemotherapy,” said Dr. Jones of his study, which was published in the New York Academy of Science.

“People who accepted chemotherapy die within three years of diagnosis, a large number dies immediately after a few weeks.” 

According to the physician, the only reason doctors prescribe chemotherapy is because they make money from it. Such an accusation doesn’t seem unreasonable, as cancer

Patients rejecting conventional therapy live 4x longer

“Patients with breast cancer who reject conventional therapy live four times longer than those who follow the system. So this is something that you will not hear in the mass media, which will continue  the myth…”

Despite the fact that the United States spends more on healthcare than any other high-income nation in the world, diseases of affluence continue to increase in prevalence, resulting in a shorter life expectancy.

Perhaps this is because mainstream media and the allopathic healthcare system don’t teach about the importance of preventative medicine. Eating a healthy diet, engaging in exercise, thinking positive thoughts, reducing stress, and enjoying the company of others – or habits that bring joy – are all proven to improve longevity and happiness.

Natural alternatives

In addition, potent all natural medicines, such as cannabis oil, are also strictly regulated and illegal in many areas – despite the fact that CBD-rich oil from the marijuana plant is listed as a remedy on the U.S.’ National Cancer Institute’s website.   www.druglinks.info

As it is, there is no money in a healthy population, which is why fast food joints and pharmaceutical industries thrive in America. Hopefully, Dr. Jones’ efforts will inspire people to seek out alternative options if they or someone they know develops the debilitating disease.

RELATED LINKS BELOW

www.druglinks.info

www.sunblestproducts.com

www.pythonjungle.com

www.ozrural.com.au

Henry Sapiecha

Scientists Find Substance In Mangosteen Kills 99% Of Breast & other Cancer Cells In lab tests

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018

This is a follow up on an earlier posting on Mangosteen in this site.

Great news for mangosteen lovers and those following the quest to find novel anti-cancer medicines derived from plants! We just received this report from our friends over at The Eden Prescription: In a new study published in Molecular Cancer (an open-access, peer-reviewed journal) alpha-mangostin, a substance derived from mangosteen pericarp, was shown to kill up to 99% of human breast cancer cells in vitro.*

What was particularly interesting about this study was that the researchers gained a deeper understanding of the mechanism of action of the mangosteen-derived substance. Alpha-mangostin was reported to block Fatty Acid Synthase – which disrupts the cancer cells’ ability to make fatty acids – without which they die. [1]

It appears that numerous cancer cell types require Fatty Acid Synthase for their survival, which may be the reason why mangostin has received much attention recently; it has also been found deadly also to prostate, liver, colon, and pancreatic cancers as well as leukemia.

Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) is an amazing, delicious tropical fruit – one of my favorites in fact – and was originally native to Thailand. Don’t be fooled by the name, it does not look or taste like a mango. Mangosteen has a thick, pithy casing (pericarp) which is easily broken or cut open to reveal the white, fleshy part inside that is eaten. Mangosteen is also considered potentially valuable with weight loss, inflammation, heart disease and diabetes! However it is the pericarp that may have the strongest medicinal qualities. For centuries, people in Southeast Asia have used dried mangosteen pericarp as antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, antipyretic, analgesic, and as a treatment for rashes. [2]

Tests like the study mentioned are the first step in the development and study of new medicines. It’s a long way before we can say for certain that mangosteen will have a direct anti-cancer action in humans – and in this study the beneficial substance was in the pericarp (the pithy case). However there have now been several promising studies on mangosteen extracts – including a 2013 study in which alpha-mangostin significantly suppressed tumor growth and reduced lymph node metastasis in mammary cancer in mice; leading researchers to conclude that “Mangosteen extracts appear to, in fact, have chemopreventive qualities and might prove useful as adjunctive and/or complementary alternative treatments in human breast cancer.” [2]

Mangosteen pericarp is available in supplement form.

* “In vitro” (literally “in glass”) is a scientific term used to denote that the test was done on isolated cell cultures in laboratory glassware, as opposed to in living creatures (“In vivo”).

www.sunblestproducts.com

Henry Sapiecha

BLACK SALVE COMPOUND SAID TO BE A MIRACLE CURE SAY SOME.PICS GALLERY

Friday, June 29th, 2018

This salve consisting of Blood Root, Zinc Chloride & other herbal inclusions is said to get rid of skin melanomas, sometimes in just a matter of days. I interviewed the woman who used it on her husband & her/his friends who had lost hope in traditional treatments. She supplied me with a number of images of persons close to her who have used the product & were amazed with the results.

WARNING >>THESE IMAGES MAY BE DISTURBING TO SOME VIEWERS

Mrs M as we shall call her is able to make & sell the salve as treatment for removing growths on animals. We could say that we are animals perhaps & use the product. Not for me to say. I am just telling you her story. I have used the product myself also with great success. Your call to either use it or not. Don’t let the pics scare you. It is just part of the process in healing going through the stages, from application to growth removal.

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The above graphic images show you the basic overall process of killing the tumour or growth.

SOME RELATED ARTICLES POSTED INTO THIS SITE EARLIER

DIY BLACK SALVE FORMULA & HOW TO MAKE IT VIDEO

BLACK SALVE OINTMENT TREATMENT FOR CANCERS [22] VIDEO COLLECTION YOU TUBE

THE BLACK SALVE SELF TREATMENT FOR CANCERS TRUE STORY HERE & 22 BLACK SALVE VIDEOS ALSO IN THIS SITE

CANSEMA INDIAN BLACK SALVE TREATMENT FOR CANCERS HOW TO USE & A BREAST CANCER SUCCESS STORY

Applying the salve to the tumour or cancer & covering it with a sterile bandage.Leave for 3-4 days & reapply new bandage & more salve if required. Do not get it wet during this period.Small growths can usually be removed at this stage by pulling off the scab formed & in so doing the salve has done its work & killed the growth.In pulling off the scab it also takes out the deadly growth like popping a cork with instant pain relief.

It leaves a clean empty hole that heals up over a short period using the normal care treatments available. It does not appear to attack the healthy tissue just the infected growth or sick tissue.

NOTE->While the salve is doing its work there will be some level of infection type pain to the person

*I the owner of this site do sing praises of this black salve because having tried it on 2 small growths on my leg, both are gone with no trace of them ever having been there.

IF YOU WANT MORE INFO ON THIS JUST INQUIRE>> HERE

www.sunblestproducts.com

www.druglinks.info

Henry Sapiecha

Video presentation by Jimmy Lin explains how this simple new blood test that can catch cancer early

Friday, January 19th, 2018

A simple new blood test that can catch cancer early | Jimmy Lin

Jimmy Lin is developing technologies to catch cancer months to years before current methods. He shares a breakthrough technique that looks for small signals of cancer’s presence via a simple blood test, detecting the recurrence of some forms of the disease 100 days earlier than traditional methods. It could be a light at the end of the tunnel in a fight where early detection makes all the difference. Check out more TED talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading movers & shakers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global problems, the arts and much more.

Henry Sapiecha

HUGE LIST OF HERBS USED FOR DISEASE TREATMENTS CURES & BENEFITS-SHARE

Tuesday, November 14th, 2017

This information has been supplied by herbs-info.com

List Of Herbs

On this page you will find our alphabetical list of 150+ 189 herbs! Every herb in our list has its own dedicated page on this site – with pictures and very detailed info! Follow the links to learn more about each herb. The goal of the individual herbs’ pages is to gather information about the plant in one place, so that anyone researching it can have quick access to information.

Please bookmark this page so that you can use it as a “quick lookup” when you want to learn all about a herb. You can also share our image on Facebook and Pinterest. Each herb page follows a similar format – starting with names for the herb in different languages, then giving background and history, common and traditional uses of the herb, scientific research, esoteric uses and safety notes.

Our method of organization intentionally follows the style of the old herbals, which listed the plants in alphabetical order and often compiled the writings of other herbalists from past times. There is much material to work through and so this list is continuing to expand. Ok, here is the list!

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The Herbs:There are many more to yet come.

Agrimony | Ajwain | Alfalfa | Alkanet | Allspice | Aloe Vera | Althaea Officinalis (Marsh Mallow) | Amla | Angelica | Angostura | Anise | Arabian Jasmine | Arnica | Arrach | Artemisia | Asafoetida | Ashwagandha | Bacopa Monnieri | Bashful Mimosa | Basil | Bay Laurel | Bean | Bears Breech | Belladonna | Benzoin | Bergamot | Betony | Bilberry | Bitter Melon | Black Pepper | Blackberry Bush | Blumea Camphor | Boneset | Borage | Brooklime | Bryony | Bugle | Burdock | Butterbur | Cacao | Cajeput | Calendula | Canella | Capers | Cardamom | Carob Tree | Cascara Sagrada | Cascarilla | Catechu | Catnip | Cat’s Whiskers | Catsfoot | Cayenne | Cedron | Celery | Centory | Chamomile | Cheken | Chervil | Chinese Honeysuckle | Chives | Cilantro | Cinnamon | Clavo Huasca | Clove | Coltsfoot | Comfrey | Contrayerba | Copal | Cordyceps | Cumin | Daffodil | Damiana | Dandelion | Deadly Nightshade | Dill | Dittany Of Crete | Dodder | Dragon’s Blood | Echinacea | Elder | Epazote | Female Peony | Fennel | Fenugreek | Feverfew | Five Leaved Chaste Tree | Flax | Frankincense | Galangal | Garlic | Gentian | Ginger | Gingko Biloba | Ginseng | Goat’s Rue | Goji | Golden Seal | Gotu Kola | Green Tea | Guarana | Guava | Hearts Ease | Heavenly Elixir | Hedge Nettle | Henna | Hibiscus | Hollyhocks | Holy Basil | Holy Basil | Honeysuckle | Hops | Horny Goat Weed | Horseradish | Horsetail | Hyacinth | Indian Laurel | Jew’s Mallow | Juniper | Kava | Ladies Mantle | Lady’s Thistle | Lavender | Lead Tree | Lemon Balm | Lemongrass | Lesser Calamint | Licorice | Lily of the Valley | Male Satyrion | Marjoram | Milk Thistle | Moringa | Mountain Apple | Mugwort | Mullein | Neem | Nelumbo Nucifera | Nutmeg | Nymphaea Caerulea | Onion | Oregano | Orris Root | Paprika | Parsley | Passion Flower | Patchouli | Pepper Elder | Pimiento Pepper | Plantain | Primrose | Queen’s Flower | Red Clover | Reishi | Rhubarb | Ringworm Bush | Rooibos | Rosemary | Rue | Saffron | Sage | Savory | Saw Palmetto | Seaweed | Senna | Slippery Elm | Snake Needle Grass | Snakeweed | Soapnuts | Solomon’s Seal | Spearmint | Spiny Sapindus | St. John’s Wort | St Thomas Bean | Star Anise | Starfruit | Stinging Nettle | Sumac | Sweetsop | Tamarind | Tarragon | Tea | Thyme | Turmeric | Uva-Ursi | Valerian | Vanilla | Vervain | Water Hyssop | Wild Oregano | Wild Tea | Witch Hazel | Yarrow | Yerba Mate |

www.foodpassions.net

Henry Sapiecha

Expected to die decades ago, Kate Vines is still living with cancer over 26 years later

Saturday, July 8th, 2017

An oncologist at the Royal North Shore Hospital told Kate Vines she should ensure her affairs were in order as her life was coming to an end. She was suffering from medullary thyroid cancer.

Auckland-born Vines was 33 years old, living in Sydney with her husband and their five-year-old son. She had been diagnosed 18 months earlier and had her thyroid removed, but the surgeon found the cancer had already metastasised into her lymph nodes and spread into her chest. Six weeks later, she had a thoracotomy – her breast bone was cut in half – and the doctors again sliced away as many of the tumours as they could find, but they knew there were others, unreachable and undiscovered, that would kill her.

Vines’ GP, the first person she had consulted, had never seen a patient with medullary thyroid cancer. In fact, he had never heard of the condition. He did not believe she could be cured.

“Basically, I was left with pretty much no treatment options whatsoever,” says Vines.

Twenty-six years after she was first diagnosed, Vines is sitting at an outdoor table at Georges Mediterranean Bar and Grill on a warm afternoon in Darling Harbour, smiling and chatting and acting considerably more alive than I generally feel before lunch.

But she still has cancer.

“I’ve never been in remission,” she says. “I’ve always had evidence of cancer. Once it’s metastasised, the molecular structure of the cancer changes, and that makes it much more difficult to treat. I have a lot of ‘secondaries’ in my bones. I have miliary disease in my lungs, which is a whole lot of tiny little tumours. I do have a couple in my liver. I’ve got one lesion in my brain, and a number of other soft-tissue tumours. It’s called ‘indolent’, it’s quite slow growing, and the doctors say that at some point it will take off again. Every now and then it raises its little hand and I have a little spurt and I have to look at treatment options. But it’s almost like my body’s learned to live with it.”

Today, Vines is the head of patient care at Rare Cancers Australia, a charity she founded after more than two decades of surviving her sickness. She describes herself back then as “a young, fairly fit, I thought fairly healthy mum, who had a great life and everything at my feet”. Her son, Paul, was her “absolute pride and joy”, and almost a miracle as Vines had suffered from endometriosis and been told she probably could not have children. Her then-husband, Ray, was her best friend. They worked together in a panel-beaters’ supply business, and travelled the world.

Vines’ diagnosis changed everything but, she says, Ray constantly reinforced to her that she had to be there for Paul’s 21st birthday – and that long-term goal perhaps helped to keep her alive. However, she was becoming sicker and sicker. She tried alternative therapies at the Gerson Clinic in Mexico – with lots of carrot juice, a vegan diet and coffee enemas – but says she would never recommend that to anyone. “I turned bright orange from all the carotene and I lost about 15 kilos in weight and I was so sick that I couldn’t get out of bed,” she says.

Next, she went to the Gawler Cancer Foundation in Victoria, which promotes a “holistic” approach to wellbeing, stressing diet, meditation and positive life changes. She says Gawler was really helpful but, “during this time, my marriage broke up. With all the pressure I was under with my health, I felt that I would do better if I was on my own with Paul. So Ray moved out.”

She lived with her son for a year, but when he was about eight years old she felt she was not coping with being a single mother while also having multiple surgeries to remove cancerous lymph nodes from her neck. So she asked Ray if he would take Paul, which he did.

“That was the most difficult decision I’ve had to make,” she says. “It was absolutely devastating. But I felt it was better for him to have a part-time mother than no mother at all. I knew that if I had time just for me, I could do the meditations and all the things that I thought were necessary for me to get well.”

Eventually, she left the city for a 25-acre farm in Kangaroo Valley, where she felt healthier than she had for years. She moved to Melbourne, where she was under the care of a Victorian oncologist who suggested cytotoxic chemotherapy for the secondary cancers in her bones.

She had been experiencing severe chest pains, but they disappeared with the first round of chemo – which was, she says, “quite an amazing thing; they didn’t expect it”. However, after three further rounds she’d lost all her hair and lots of weight, and was sick again. She said no more.

In Melbourne, she met her husband, Richard, who had worked for several non-profit organisations, and her oncologist suggested she and Richard should set up an organisation to advocate for rare-cancer patients. Although 42,000 Australians are diagnosed with a rare cancer every year, their conditions are difficult to research. Many rare cancers are very aggressive, so there are rarely large patient populations to study and it can be impossible to set up full-scale clinical trials for potentially helpful drugs.

Since drugs cannot be approved by the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme without the necessary trials, there are few treatments for rare cancers available under the PBS. Therefore, rare-cancer patients might need to spend $10,000 a month on a new immunotherapy, for example, and be forced to sell their homes to stay alive.

Luckier patients might benefit from compassionate-access programs from pharmaceutical companies, but drugs manufacturers are not allowed to advertise these programs.

“It’s just a really unfair thing that if you happen to be unlucky enough to be diagnosed with a rare cancer, you’re almost penalised,” says Vines. “There are treatments out there that aren’t listed.”

She and Richard moved to Bowral and set up Rare Cancers Australia in June 2012. They have set up a crowd-funding platform on their website, a patient-treatment fund with an individual page for each patient, and they have raised almost $2 million and helped more than 50 patients since October 2014. Vines deals with patients every day, matching them with clinicians who know about particular rare cancers.

The charity helps them find cancer centres and clinical trials, and offers one-on-one support. Vines remembers how frightened and alone she felt when she was told to put her affairs in order, and says other rare-cancer patients are given the same advice every day.

So what does all this mean for our lunch? Well, since her diagnosis, Vines has been a vegan then a vegetarian, then she allowed herself to eat fish, now she eats “everything”.

At Georges, I order the satisfying mezze plate – which is literally everything – and Vines chooses the barramundi special – she judges it “beautiful, wonderful”. After some hesitation, she opts for vegetables over chips on the side, but she stresses that she does eat chips and she enjoys the occasional glass of wine.

After all, when you think about it, life’s too short.

Henry Sapiecha

The Tree of Life plant Moringa Oleifera Kills 97% of Pancreatic Cancer Cells in Vitro

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

We just discovered an amazing report about Moringa, courtesy of our friends over at The Eden Prescription. In 2013 scientists reported in a paper published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A peer-reviewed, open access journal) that A hot-water extract of the leaves of Moringa Oleifera killed up to 97% of human pancreatic cancer cells (Panc-1) after 72 hours in lab tests. Moringa leaf extract inhibited the growth of all pancreatic cell lines tested. [1]

Pancreatic cancer is very serious, one of the worst. Fewer than 6% patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas live five years after diagnosis. The typical treatment is currently chemotherapy.

Called the “miracle tree” on account of its many virtues, Moringa is very well known in India, parts of Africa, the Philippines and several other countries, yet it is relatively unknown in countries such as the USA. However it seems from the current buzz around it that it may well soon experience a rise to new popularity. It has a long history of use in traditional medicine due to its properties as an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, antidepressant, anti-diabetes, pain and fever reducer and even asthma treatment. We’ve dedicated a full page on our site to a detailed herbal report on the amazing Moringa and those interested in herbalism would do well to investigate this plant.

It also contains numerous powerful anti-cancer compounds such as kaempferol, rhamnetin and isoquercetin. Now, researchers are discovering that Moringa has anti-cancer potential with positive results so far against ovarian cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma in lab tests. A list of these studies can be seen on Pubmed here.

Please note that it’s a long way before Moringa can be claimed as a cancer cure, but this kind of study is important because it indicates the potential for a starting point for a medicine of the future. It’s especially interesting because Moringa is already in common use – not only in herbalism but in a wide variety of other applications.

Moringa is now extensively cultivated throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and Central America, but the largest Moringa crop in the world is produced by India – where it grows natively. It’s fascinating to note that may be one reason why the death rate from pancreatic cancer in India is a stunning 84% lower than in the United States!

**Moringa plants,material & seeds are available HERE.

Note – This article is not medical advice nor a substitute for consultation with a medical professional.

Note 2 – “In Vitro” literally means “In Glassware” and is the Latin expression to denote that the tests were done on cell cultures in a lab, as opposed to “In Vivo” which means tested on living creatures. Such studies indicate preliminary success but much more research will be needed to “prove” efficacy in humans. Though the huge disparity in pancreatic cancer rates in India is highly encouraging.

Check out our full “herbal page” on Moringa – tons of detailed information for those wishing to study this plant in depth: http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Please check out The Eden Prescription for more reports on the cutting edge science being done investigating the medicinal properties of herbs!

References:

[1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23957955

Moringa oleifera and the hot water infusions derived from its flowers, roots, leaves, seeds, and bark were also determined to possess antispasmodic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. In particular, the seed infusion appears to suppress the contraction induced by acetylcholine in this study (ED50 of 65.6 mg/mL) and the edema stimulated by carrageenan at 1000 mg/kg. Diuretic activity was noted at a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. Some of these cited biological properties were also noted in the roots. [24]

Moringa – Active Compounds

One thing that Moringa truly and clearly has under its belt is its being a rich and good source – not to mention affordable and readily accessible – of vital minerals and vitamins, protein, β-carotene, amino acids, and various phenolics. Zeatin, quercetin, β-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid, and kaempferol can also be isolated from Moringa. [25] Upon a comprehensive analysis of Moringa glucosinolates and phenolics (including flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, and cinnamates), Bennett et al. (2003) found that:

The seeds contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate at high concentrations.

The roots have high concentrations of 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and benzyl glucosinolate.

The leaves contain 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate and three monoacetyl isomers of this glucosinolate; quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-(6′ ‘-malonyl-glucoside); kaempferol-3-O-glucoside and kaempferol-3-O-(6’ ‘-malonyl-glucoside) in lower amounts; and 3-caffeoylquinic acid and 5-caffeoylquinic acid.

The bark contains 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)-benzylglucosinolate. [24]

Names of Moringa, past and present

English: Moringa, Horseradish Tree, Tree Of Life, Moringa Tree of Paradise, Moringa the Never Die Tree, Drumstick Tree, Ben Oil Tree, Ben Tree
Latin (scientific nomenclature): Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Hyperanthera moringa (archaic)
Tamil: Murungai / Murungai Maram
Mandarin: la mu
Cantonese: lat mok (lit. ‘spicy wood’)
Filipino: malunggay / kamungay
Hindi / Indian: munaga / shajna
Spanish: palo de aceite / libertad
French: ben olifiere
Ayurvedic: Shigru / Shobhanjana
Hindi: Sahjan
Punjabi: Surajan
Konkani: Mhasanga Saang
Telugu: Munagachettu

Morniga – General Information

Moringa is a genus of 13 species of tropical and subtropical plants. The most widely known of these, and the subject of this article, is Moringa oleifera – a tree native to northwestern India. Moringa oleifera, commonly referred to as just “Moringa”, grows fast in a variety of climates and is cultivated in many regions because it can grow in poor or even some barren soils. Much of the plant is edible. The leaves are nutritious and are used as food for people and feed for livestock. [1]

The moringa tree is often referred to by its advocates as the ‘tree of life’ due to its seemingly miraculous nutritional benefits and sheer versatility. This unassuming, curiously shaped tree is grown as a landscape tree and food source in many parts of the world – although its use as a type of vegetable and nutritive food first developed in countries such as Africa, the Himalayas, China, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Philippines. This hardy plant grows in a wide variety of soils ranging from sandy, loamy, and even clayish soils and is resistant to drought and is fast-growing. Due to its hardiness, moringa can be found growing in different climates, and with its adaptability (with the exception that it does not tolerate frost very well), the trees are easily grown and cultivated with very little to no maintenance required. [2]

The moringa tree, when left to its own devices, usually grows as much as ten metres, although when cultivated for its leaves, seed pods (aka ‘drumsticks’), seeds, or flowers it is usually trimmed and maintained at an easily reachable length of one to three metres tall to allow for easier harvesting of its constituent parts.

Proponents of Moringa oleifera sing its praises. It has been described as “one of the most useful plants that exists” – owing to its unusual combination of high nutritional value, medicinal properties, fast growing and ability to thrive in arid environments. The leaves are rich in vitamins, proteins and minerals such as calcium, potassium and iron.

One of the reasons the Moringa tree can thrive in arid regions is that it has a long taproot – which also makes it valuable against soil erosion. [3] The main products made from the plant are edible seed oil, tea leaves and animal feed. The seed kernels are also used by the French perfume manufacturing industry. [4] The Moringa tree is now widely cultivated in Africa, Sri Lanka, India, Central and South America, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other food may be scarce. [5]

Moringa oleifera is listed in the AHPA’s “Herbs of Commerce”, p98. [6]

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References & Further Reading

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[3] http://www.miracletrees.org

[4] http://web.archive.org/web/20090906184503/http://www.shaebia.org/artman/publish/article_5934.shtml

[5] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera

[6] “Herbs of Commerce” (AHPA) (2000 edition) – Michael McGuffin, John T. Kartesz, Albert Y Leung, Arthur O. Tucker p.98

[7] http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Moringa.html

[8] http://books.google.com/books?id=ZUw-AAAAcAAJ

[9] http://www.treesforlife.org/our-work/our-initiatives/moringa

[10] http://web.archive.org/web/20120821200349/http://moringafact.com/health-benefit-of-moringa-leaves-and-moringa-seeds/

[11] http://edlagman.com/moringa/moringa-health-benefits.htm

[12] http://leafpower.wordpress.com/moringa-benefits/

[13] http://www.mb.com.ph/articles/201276/moringa-malunggay-philippines#.ULEkU-Tqk8o

[14] http://www.sooperarticles.com/food-drinks-articles/health-benefits-recipe-ben-oil-tree-malunggay-798017.html

[15] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-oil.php

[16] http://www.moringasource.com/moringa-benefits.php

[17] http://www.ngrguardiannews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=95883:the-nutritional-and-healing-benefits-of-moringa&catid=105: saturday-magazine&Itemid=566

[18] http://books.google.com/books?id=tR6gAAAAMAAJ (p.123)

[19] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19666102

[20] Anwar F., Latif S., Ashraf M., & Gilani A. H. (2007). Moringa oleifera: a food plant with multiple medicinal uses. Phytotherapy Research, 21(1): 17–25. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17089328/

[21] Mbikay M. (2012). Therapeutic potential of Moringa oleifera leaves in chronic hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia: A review. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 3:24. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00024. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3290775/

[22] Ndong M., Uehara M., Katsumata S., & Suzuki K. (2007). Effects of oral administration of Moringa oleifera Lam on glucose tolerance in Goto-Kakizaki and Wistar rats. Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 40(3): 229–233. doi: 10.3164/jcbn.40.229. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398501/

[23] Jaiswal D., Kumar Rai P., Kumar A., Mehta S., & Watal G. (2009).Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. leaves aqueous extract therapy on hyperglycemic rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 123(3): 392–396. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.03.036. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19501271/

[24] Cáceres A., Saravia A., Rizzo S., Zabala L., De Leon E., & Nave F. (1992).Pharmacologic properties of Moringa oleifera. 2: Screening for antispasmodic, antiinflammatory and diuretic activity. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 36(3): 233–237. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1434682/

[25] Bennett R. N. et al. (2003).Profiling glucosinolates and phenolics in vegetative and reproductive tissues of the multi-purpose trees Moringa oleifera L. (horseradish tree) and Moringa stenopetala L. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(12): 3546–3553. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12769522/

*** MORINGA PLANTS-SEEDS & MATERIAL AVAILABLE HERE

CONTENT FOR THIS ARTICLE WAS OBTAINED FROM THE GREAT SITE BELOW

http://www.herbs-info.com/moringa.html

Henry Sapiecha

Precision Medicine: What Is Cancer, Really? Scientists overview here.

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

The men and women who are trying to bring down cancer are starting to join forces rather than work alone. Together, they are winning a few of the battles against the world’s fiercest disease. For this unprecedented special report, we visited elite cancer research centers around the country to find out where we are in the war.

I. Precision Medicine: What Is Cancer, Really?

When you visit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, you expect to feel devastated. It starts in the waiting room. Oh, here we go with the little red wagons, you think, observing the cattle herd of them rounded up by the entrance to the Patient Care Center. Oh, here we go with the crayon drawings of needles. The itch begins at the back of your throat, and you start blinking very fast and mentally researching how much money you could donate without starving. Near a row of arcade games, a preteen curls his face into his mother’s shoulder while she strokes his head. Oh, here we go.

But the more time you spend at St. Jude, the more that feeling is replaced with wonder. In a cruel world you’ve found a free hospital for children, started by a Hollywood entertainer as a shrine to the patron saint of lost causes. There is no other place like this. Corporations that have nothing to do with cancer—nothing to do with medicine, even—have donated vast sums of money just to be a part of it. There’s a Chili’s Care Center. The cafeteria is named for Kay Jewelers.

Scott Newman’s office is in the Brooks Brothers Computational Biology Center, where a team of researchers is applying computer science and mathematics to the question of why cancer happens to children. Like many computer people, Newman is very smart and a little quiet and doesn’t always exactly meet your eyes when he speaks to you. He works on St. Jude’s Genomes for Kids project, which invites newly diagnosed patients to have both their healthy and tumor cells genetically sequenced so researchers can poke around.

“Have you seen a circle plot before?” Newman asks, pulling out a diagram of the genes in a child’s cancer. “If I got a tattoo, it would be one of these.” Around the outside of the circle plot is something that looks like a colorful bar code. Inside, a series of city skylines. Through the center are colored arcs like those nail-and-string art projects students make in high school geometry class. The diagram represents everything that has gone wrong within a child’s cells to cause cancer. It’s beautiful.

A Genetic Disaster: This circular visualization shows real gene mutations found in 3,000 pediatric cancers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Genes with sequence mutations are labeled in blue; those with structural variations are in red; and those

“These are the genes in this particular tumor that have been hit,” Newman says in a Yorkshire accent that emphasizes the t at the end of the word hit in a quietly violent way. “And that’s just one type of thing that’s going on. Chromosomes get gained or lost in cancer. This one has gained that one, that one, that one, that one,” he taps the page over and over. “And then there are structural rearrangements where little bits of genome get switched around.” He points to the arcs sweeping across the page. “There are no clearly defined rules.”

It’s not like you don’t have cancer and then one day you just do. Cancer—or, really, cancers, because cancer is not a single disease—happens when glitches in genes cause cells to grow out of control until they overtake the body, like a kudzu plant. Genes develop glitches all the time: There are roughly twenty thousand genes in the human body, any of which can get misspelled or chopped up. Bits can be inserted or deleted. Whole copies of genes can appear and disappear, or combine to form mutants. The circle plot Newman has shown me is not even the worst the body can do. He whips out another one, a snarl of lines and blocks and colors. This one would not make a good tattoo.

“As a tumor becomes cancerous and grows, it can accumulate many thousands of genetic mutations. When we do whole genome sequencing, we see all of them,” Newman says. To whittle down the complexity, he applies algorithms that pop out gene mutations most likely to be cancer-related, based on a database of all the mutations researchers have already found. Then, a genome analyst manually determines whether each specific change the algorithm found seems likely to cause problems. Finally, the department brings its list of potentially important changes to a committee of St. Jude’s top scientists to discuss and assign a triage score. The mutations that seem most likely to be important get investigated first.

It took thirteen years and cost $2.7 billion to sequence the first genome, which was completed in 2003. Today, it costs $1,000 and takes less than a week. Over the last two decades, as researchers like Newman have uncovered more and more of the individual genetic malfunctions that cause cancer, teams of researchers have begun to tinker with those mutations, trying to reverse the chaos they cause. (The first big success in precision medicine was Gleevec, a drug that treats leukemias that are positive for a common structural rearrangement called the Philadelphia chromosome. Its launch in 2001 was revolutionary.) Today, there are eleven genes that can be targeted with hyperspecific cancer therapies, and at least thirty more being studied. At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, 30 to 40 percent of incoming patients now qualify for precision medicine studies.

Charles Mullighan,a tall, serious Australian who also works at St. Jude, is perhaps the ideal person to illustrate how difficult it will be to cure cancer using precision medicine. After patients’ cancer cells are sequenced, and the wonky mutations identified, Mullighan’s lab replicates those mutations in mice, then calls St. Jude’s chemical library to track down molecules—some of them approved medicines from all over the world, others compounds that can illuminate the biology of tumors—to see if any might help.

New York: Britta Weigelt and Jorge Reis-Filho use police forensics techniques to repair old tumor samples at Memorial Sloan Kettering so the samples can be genetically profiled.

If Mullighan is lucky, one of the compounds he finds will benefit the mice, and he’ll have the opportunity to test it in humans. Then he’ll hope there are no unexpected side effects, and that the cancer won’t develop resistance, which it often does when you futz with genetics. There are about twenty subtypes of the leukemia Mullighan studies, and that leukemia is one of a hundred different subtypes of cancer. This is the kind of precision required in precision cancer treatment—even if Mullighan succeeds in identifying a treatment that works as well as Gleevec, with the help of an entire, well-funded hospital, it still will work for only a tiny proportion of patients.

Cancer is not an ordinary disease. Cancer is the disease—a phenomenon that contains the whole of genetics and biology and human life in a single cell. It will take an army of researchers to defeat it.

Luckily, we’ve got one.

Interlude

“I used to do this job out in L.A.,” says the attendant at the Hertz counter at Houston’s George Bush Intercontinental Airport. “There, everyone is going on vacation. They’re going to the beaach or Disneyland or Hollywood or wherever.

“Because of MD Anderson, I see more cancer patients here. They’re so skinny. When they come through this counter, they’re leaning on someone’s arm. They can’t drive themselves. You think, there is no way this person will survive. And then they’re back in three weeks, and in six months, and a year. I’m sure I miss some, who don’t come through anymore because they’ve died. But the rest? They come back.”

II. Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: You Have the Power Within You!

On a bookshelf in Jim Allison’s office at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston (and on the floor surrounding it) are so many awards that some still sit in the boxes they came in. The Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award looks like the Winged Victory statue in the Louvre. The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, whose benefactors include Sergey Brin, Anne Wojcicki, and Mark Zuckerberg, came with $3 million.

“I gotta tidy that up sometime,” Allison says.

Allison has just returned to the office from back surgery that fused his L3, L4, and L5 vertebrae, which has slightly diminished his Texas rambunctiousness. Even on painkillers, though, he can explain the work that many of his contemporaries believe will earn him the Nobel Prize: He figured out how to turn the immune system against tumors.

“One day, the miracles won’t be miracles at all. They’ll just be what happens.”

Allison is a basic scientist. He has a Ph.D., rather than an M.D., and works primarily with cells and molecules rather than patients. When T-cells, the most powerful “killer cells” in the immune system, became better understood in the late 1960s, Allison became fascinated with them. He wanted to know how it was possible that a cell roaming around your body knew to kill infected cells but not healthy ones. In the mid-1990s, both Allison’s lab and the lab of Jeffrey Bluestone at the University of Chicago noticed that a molecule called CTLA-4 acted as a brake on T-cells, preventing them from wildly attacking the body’s own cells, as they do in autoimmune diseases.

Allison’s mother died of lymphoma when he was a child and he has since lost two uncles and a brother to the disease. “Every time I found something new about how the immune system works, I would think, I wonder how this works on cancer?” he says. When the scientific world discovered that CTLA-4 was a brake, Allison alone wondered if it might be important in cancer treatment. He launched an experiment to see if blocking CTLA-4 would allow the immune system to attack cancer tumors in mice. Not only did the mice’s tumors disappear, the mice were thereafter immune to cancer of the same type.

Ipilimumab (“ipi” for short) was the name a small drug company called Medarex gave the compound it created to shut off CTLA-4 in humans. Early trials of the drug, designed just to show whether ipi was safe, succeeded so wildly that Bristol Myers Squibb bought Medarex for $2.4 billion. Ipilimumab (now marketed as Yervoy) became the first “checkpoint inhibitor”: It blocks one of the brakes, or checkpoints, the immune system has in place to prevent it from attacking healthy cells. Without the brakes the immune system can suddenly, incredibly, recognize cancer as the enemy.

“You see the picture of that woman over there?” Allison points over at his desk. Past his lumbar-support chair, the desk is covered in papers and awards and knickknacks and frames, including one containing a black card with the words “Never never never give up” printed on it. Finally, the photo reveals itself, on a little piece of blue card stock.

That’s the first patient I met,” Allison says. “She was about twenty-four years old. She had metastatic melanoma. It was in her brain, her lungs, her liver. She had failed everything. She had just graduated from college, just gotten married. They gave her a month.”

The woman, Sharon Belvin, enrolled in a phase-two trial of ipilimumab at Memorial Sloan Kettering, where Allison worked at the time. Today, Belvin is thirty-five, cancer- free, and the mother of two children. When Allison won the Lasker prize, in 2015, the committee flew Belvin to New York City with her husband and her parents to see him receive it. “She picked me up and started squeezing me,” Allison says. “I walked back to my lab and thought, Wow, I cure mice of tumors and all they do is bite me.” He adds, dryly, “Of course, we gave them the tumors in the first place.”

After ipi, Allison could have taken a break and waited for his Nobel, driving his Porsche Boxster with the license plate CTLA-4 around Houston and playing the occasional harmonica gig. (Allison, who grew up in rural Texas, has played since he was a teenager and once performed “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” onstage with Willie Nelson.) Instead, his focus has become one of two serious problems with immunotherapy: It only works for some people.

So far, the beneficiaries of immune checkpoint therapy appear to be those with cancer that develops after repeated genetic mutations—metastatic melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer, and bladder cancer, for example. These are cancers that often result from bad habits like smoking and sun exposure. But even within these types of cancer, immune checkpoint therapies improve long-term survival in only about 20 to 25 percent of patients. In the rest the treatment fails, and researchers have no idea why.

Lately, Allison considers immune checkpoint therapy a “platform”—a menu of treatments that can be amended and combined to increase the percentage of people for whom it works. A newer drug called Keytruda that acts on a different immune checkpoint, PD-1, knocked former president Jimmy Carter’s metastatic melanoma into remission in 2015. Recent trials that blocked both PD-1 and CTLA-4 in combination improved long-term survival in 60 percent of melanoma patients. Now, doctors are combining checkpoint therapies with precision cancer drugs, or with radiation, or with chemotherapy. Allison refers to this as “one from column A, and one from column B.”

The thing about checkpoint inhibitor therapy that is so exciting—despite the circumscribed group of patients for whom it works, and despite sometimes mortal side effects from the immune system going buck-wild once the brakes come off—is the length of time it can potentially give people. Before therapies that exploited the immune system, response rates were measured in a few extra months of life. Checkpoint inhibitor therapy helps extremely sick people live for years. So what if it doesn’t work for everyone? Every cancer patient you can add to the success pile is essentially cured.

Jennifer Wargo and team remove lymph nodes from a melanoma patient.

Potent Plant powder power prevents malaria victims from dying

Monday, May 8th, 2017

So what is this plant?

Weathers has made several high-producing versions of the plant using tissue cultures  (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

When 18 malaria patients in the Congo failed to respond to conventional treatments and instead continued to head toward terminal status, doctors knew they had to act fast – and try something different. So instead of turning to more synthetic drugs, they turned instead to nature and found a solution that delivered remarkable results.

The patients were first treated with the regimen described by the World Health Organization (WHO): artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This drug combines an extract from a plant known as Artemisia annua, with other drugs that launch a multi-pronged attack on the malaria parasite. But just as is the case with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the malaria parasite is evolving to resist the drugs designed to kill it. In fact, according to the WHO, three of the five malarial parasites that infect humans have shown drug resistance.

As the patients continued to decline, with one five-year-old even entering into a coma, the doctors administered a drug called artesunate intravenously, which is the preferred course of action when treating severe malaria. The treatment didn’t work.

Finally, doctors turned to the Artemisia annua plant itself. Also called sweet wormwood or sweet Annie, the plant is the source of the chemical artemisinin, which is used in ACT therapy. The plant has been used since ancient times in Chinese medicine to treat fevers, although this bit of knowledge was lost until 1970 when the Chinese Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergency Treatments (340 AD) was rediscovered. In 1971 it was found that extracts from the plant could fight malaria in primates.

Pamela Weathers, professor of biology and biotechnology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute began researching Artemisia annua over 25 years ago. Along with postdoctoral fellow Melissa Towler, Weathers created a pill made from nothing more than the dried and powdered leaves of the plant. When the pills were given to the 18 dying patients over the course of five days, all of them completely recovered, with no trace of the malaria parasite remaining in their blood.

“These 18 patients were dying,” Weathers said. “So to see 100 percent recover, even the child who had lapsed into a coma, was just amazing. It’s a small study, but the results are powerful.”

Weathers had previously shown that the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant (DLA) could deliver 40 times more Artemisia annua to the blood than extracts of the plant alone. In a later experiment, she showed that not only could the leaves beat drug-resistant bacteria in mice, but that after passing the malaria parasite through 49 generations of mice, the parasite still showed no resistance to the plant.

While the exact mechanism through which DLA operates is unclear, Weathers says it’s likely due to the intricate chemical dance that occurs between the phytochemicals in the leaves.

Weathers with the Artemisia plant (Credit: Worcester Polytechnic Institute)

Because the drug is inexpensive and relatively simply to produce, Weathers also says that it could be a source of industry for people living in the areas where malaria is a problem, such as Ghana, Kenya and Malawi where it was recently announced that the first malaria vaccines will be deployed. “This simple technology can be owned, operated, and distributed by Africans for Africans,” said Weathers, who has already established a supply chain on the continent for the leaves using local producers.

Weathers also said that further research into DLA could lead to effective ways to combat other maladies.

“We have done a lot of work to understand the biochemistry of these compounds, which include a number of flavonoids and terpenes, so we can better understand the role they play in the pharmacological activity of the dried leaves,” Weathers said. “The more we learn, the more excited we become about the potential for DLA to be the medication of choice for combatting malaria worldwide. Artemisia annua is known to be efficacious against a range of other diseases, including other tropical maladies and certain cancers, so in our lab we are already at work investigating the effectiveness of DLA with other diseases.”

The results of the case in the Congo have been described in the journal Phytomedicine. You can hear more from Weathers in the video below.

Source: Worcester Polytechnic Institute

www.pythonjungle.com

Henry Sapiecha