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Universal Cancer Vaccine Is Probably Impossible

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Cancer-Vaccine-image www.newcures (2)

The quest for vaccines to prevent cancers just hit a theoretical limit: If there ever are vaccines, there will have to be many, and not just one.

In theory, the best possible treatment for cancer would be one that required no radiation or surgery, instead using the body’s immune system to turn back a tumor’s uncontrollable growth. Recent developments in using immunotherapy to treat cancer has researchers thinking about a cancer vaccine as a potential breakthrough in prevention. But new research suggests that we shouldn’t hold out much hope for a single, universal vaccine for cancer.

While the first scientist to look at the immune system’s potential role in treating cancer conducted his research in the 1890s, it’s only in the past decade that immunotherapy has really taken off. Most famously, President Jimmy Carter was declared cancer-free in 2016 after immunotherapy was used to help treat a brain tumor. The basic principle is the same as any other disease the immune system deals with. The body’s defense mechanisms recognize the tumor as an invader and attack it, neutralizing the threat. The challenge lies in getting the immune system to see the tumor as a harmful, unwanted presence. It’s possible to do that by training the body’s immune system to recognize certain molecules in the tumor’s makeup.

A cancer vaccine would be the next big step for immunotherapy. While there are vaccines for cancers that are caused by an underlying infection — the HPV vaccine is probably the best-known example — vaccines meant to target non-infectious tumors are trickier. Some are in clinical trials to deal with specific types of cancer, but none are yet approved in the United States.

Based on researchers’ current knowledge, a cancer vaccine would require focusing on specific genetic alterations in tumors, which create molecules that the immune system can then target and attack if a tumor ever does pop up. The problem is that those alterations are different in every person, so each vaccine would have to be specifically designed and created for every individual patient. That would be expensive, likely prohibitively so.

The bad news, according to scientists at the cancer genetics research company Foundation Medicine and authors of the study, is that there doesn’t appear to be any way around that problem that would allow for the creation of a universal vaccine. They looked at the genomes of more than 60,000 different tumors to find any molecules that were the consistent result of these genetic alterations and that the immune systems could then go after. Even in the best-case scenario, the most common targets the researchers found would only be useful for about 0.3 percent of the population.

So a universal vaccine doesn’t appear to be possible, at least based on what we know right now. The researchers did point out that they only looked at the specifically cancer-causing parts of the tumor genomes, and it’s possible a currently unknown genetic alteration could be common enough to make a universal vaccine more feasible.

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Henry Sapiecha

MEASLES VIRUS MASSIVE DOSE KILLS OFF CANCERS SAYS MAYO CLINIC IN THIS VIDEO

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Published on May 14, 2014

A medical first — a woman with an incurable form of cancer has had all signs of living cancer cells eradicated from her body for at least 6 months. What’s more, it was accomplished in a single treatment. And the magic potion — was the measles virus.

Published on May 14, 2014

A medical first — a woman with an incurable form of cancer has had all signs of living cancer cells eradicated from her body for at least 6 months. What’s more, it was accomplished in a single treatment. And the magic potion — was the measles virus.

Henry Sapiecha

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SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE LINKED TO SKIN CANCER

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

STD linked to skin cancer


Well, well, well – it looks like the mainstream has accidentally stumbled upon the truth that skin cancer might be caused by something other than the sun. Researchers have found that some strains of HPV, a common sexually acquired virus, can dramatically increase your skin cancer risk.
Read the full story.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha


SEX VIRUS – OVARIAN CANCER & THROAT CANCER & THROAT CANCER

Thursday, July 22nd, 2010

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The Cancer-Causing Sex Virus

Matthew Herper, 07.21.10, 04:15 PM EDT

HPV–known for causing cervical cancer–is

emerging as the leading cause of throat cancer in

men. Should they get the vaccine too?

Martin Duffy, a Boston consultant and economist, thought he just had a sore throat. When it persisted for months, he went to the doctor and learned there was a tumor on his tonsils.

Duffy, now 70, had none of the traditional risk factors for throat cancer. He doesn’t smoke, doesn’t drink and has run 40 Boston marathons. Instead, his cancer was caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted and a common cause of throat and mouth cancer.

HPV tumors have a better prognosis than those caused by too many years of booze and cigarettes. But Duffy “is in the unlucky 20%” whose cancer comes back–despite rounds of chemotherapy and radiation that melted 20 more pounds off a lean 150-pound frame. Now the cancer has spread throughout his throat, making eating and talking difficult. “I made my living as a public speaker,” he says. “Now I sound like Daffy Duck.” Duffy believes he has only a few months left. “How do you tell the people you love you love them?” he asks.

Nine Things You Need To Know About HPV

//

Most strains of the HPV virus are harmless, but persistent infections with two HPV strains cause 70% of the 12,000 cases of cervical cancers diagnosed annually in the U.S. Other forms of the sexually transmitted virus can cause penile and anal cancer, and genital warts. The HPV throat cancer connection has emerged in just the last few years and is so new that the government doesn’t track its incidence. Researchers believe it is transmitted via oral sex. But top researchers estimate that there are 11,300 HPV throat cancers each year in the U.S.–and the numbers are growing fast as people have been having more sexual partners since the 1960s. By 2015 there could be 20,000 cases. For more surprising discoveries about HPV, read here.

These big numbers have some top researchers arguing that drug makers should test whether HPV vaccines now used to prevent cervical cancer in women can also prevent throat infections in boys. Two vaccines, Gardasil from Merck ( MRK news people ) and Cervarix from GlaxoSmithKline ( GSK news people ), are approved for preventing cervical cancer. Gardasil is approved for use in boys only to prevent genital warts.

// Vaccinating boys could stop this meteoric increase in throat cancer. “Clearly, boys need to be vaccinated,” says Marshall Posner, the incoming medical director of head and neck cancer at Mt. Sinai Medical Center in New York. “I want my kids to be vaccinated. I don’t see a downside to these vaccines.”

There’s only one problem: The vaccine manufacturers aren’t terribly hot on the idea. GlaxoSmithKline says it has no plans to study throat cancer. It adds that it is “committed to providing a vaccine specifically designed to protect against cervical cancer in girls and young women.”

Merck, the maker of Gardasil, seemed more interested a couple of years ago. In 2008 it funded Maura Gillison, the Ohio State University researcher who established the HPV-throat-cancer link in 2000, to do a pilot study to show that test could reliably detect HPV infection in the throat. The pilot study was successful. By early 2009 Gillison says that a larger study of the vaccine in throat cancer looked close to being green lit.

But after Merck agreed to buy rival Schering-Plough ( SGP news people ) for $41 billion in March 2009, interest in a big study seemed to evaporate, Gillison says. In a statement, Merck says that “due to competing research and business priorities, we decided not to move ahead with an efficacy study at this time.”

The drug makers’ reticence probably stems from a fear that a throat-cancer vaccine would be hard to get approved. Papilloma viruses usually cause cancer slowly, causing pre-cancerous lesions that take many years to blossom into full-fledged malignant tumors. Papilloma viruses cause the horn-like growths in rabbits that probably gave rise to myths of “jackalopes” in the American West. In the cervix, early abnormal growths can be picked up with a diagnostic test, the Pap smear. Clinical trials of Gardasil and Cervarix took advantage of this, measuring the number of pre-cancerous growths prevented by the vaccines.

But there are no easy-to-detect pre-cancers in the throat. Adolescent boys would have to be followed for decades to to see if the vaccine prevented throat cancer, an unlikely scenario. Short of this, studies could only look at the prevention of HPV throat infections, not cancer or cancer precursors directly. Approving a vaccine for wide use based on this type of short-term data would require a leap of faith that the Food and Drug Administration might not be willing to take.

Top researchers say the federal government needs to step in and fund the long study if drug companies cannot be persuaded to do it themselves. “I’m sorry Merck decided not to do it,” says Posner. “But in the end, this is a federal responsibility. It’s a public health issue.”

For his part, Martin Duffy thinks that drug companies’ complacent attitude toward throat cancer would be different if more of their employees were in his situation. “It will change real fast,” he says, “if one of their executives comes down with this disease.”

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

FREE SWINE FLU SHOTS FOR EVERYONE IN AUSTRALIA

Sunday, October 18th, 2009

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Vaccine

Protect yourself, protect your community

0431_swine_65x65A new FREE vaccine to protect Australians from pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus is ready. Panvax® H1N1 vaccine was registered by the Therapeutic Goods Administration on 18 September 2009.
There is clear evidence of serious or fatal health complications for some people who catch this flu. It is a new strain of flu that spreads easily from person to person, and experience in other countries shows that this is not just a winter flu – it could come back during spring and summer.

Vaccination is the safest response for the community, particularly as large numbers of people continue to be infected, and some are suffering serious health complications. By getting vaccinated you can protect yourself and help stop this flu spreading.

How a vaccine works

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Panvax® H1N1 Vaccine contains extracts of protein from the new flu strain. Once you get vaccinated, proteins prompt your body to produce antibodies to protect you from the virus.
Protection after vaccination varies from person to person, but people generally start producing the antibodies that provide protection two weeks after the vaccination. Protection is expected to last for at least one year.

This vaccine does not contain live virus and cannot give you influenza.

People who should get immediate vaccination

All people can get vaccinated but some people are more at risk of severe outcomes if they catch this flu. Vaccination is strongly recommended for:

  • Pregnant women
  • Parents and guardians of infants up to six months old
  • People with underlying chronic conditions, including:
    • heart disease;
    • asthma and other lung diseases;
    • cancer;
    • diabetes;
    • kidney disease;
    • neurological disease;
    • other chronic conditions (talk to your GP)
  • People who are severely obese
  • Indigenous Australians
  • Frontline health workers
  • Community care workers

Where do I get vaccinated? How do I get this vaccine?

Vaccinations will be available from 30 September. Vaccination will be available from a range of locations, including GP offices, vaccination clinics, hospitals and health centres. To check vaccination location in your State or Territory, go to:

Health department websites and phone numbers

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WA: call 1800 186 815 or visit http://www.health.wa.gov.au/swine_flu/home/
SA: call 1800 022 222 or visit www.flu.sa.gov.au
VIC: call: 1300 882 008 or visit www.humanswineflu.health.vic.gov.au
TAS: 1800 358 362 (1800 FLU DOC) or visit www.pandemic.tas.gov.au
ACT: call 02 6205 2300 or visit www.health.act.gov.au/flupandemic
NSW: visit www.emergency.health.nsw.gov.au/swineflu/vaccination/index.asp, or call 180 2007 for your local Public Health Unit contact
QLD: 13HEALTH (13 43 25 84) or vist www.health.qld.gov.au/swineflu/html/vacc.asp
NT: call 08 8922 8044 or visit www.swinefluvax.nt.gov.au

Sourced and published by Henry Sapiecha 18th October 2009

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HENDRA VIRUS – BATMAN BEATS SUPERMAN

Thursday, September 3rd, 2009

Hendra virus update

Batman beats Superman

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Batman is related to a bat.

Bats carry the deadly

Henda Virus.

Vet dies from the deadly

disease.

26 August 2009

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Biosecurity Queensland has euthanased a horse at a Cawarral horse nursery property that tested positive for Hendra virus infection.

Euthanasia is the national policy for horses confirmed as being infected with the virus.

Horses can have the virus in their system and recover, but there is an ongoing risk of the virus remaining dormant and reappearing in the future and this presents a potential threat to human and horse health.

Officers from the Australian Animal Health Laboratories (AAHL) have conducted a post mortem on the horse and taken blood and tissue samples that will help to better understand the disease.

The horse’s remains have been buried on the property in line with the appropriate biosecurity requirements.

The Cawarral property will remain under quarantine until Biosecurity Queensland is completely confident there is no chance of any further infection.

It is vital that precautions be taken on the assumption that Hendra virus may be involved in order to avoid health and mortality issues to humans and to other horses.


A Rockhampton vet has died after contracting the virus when treating an infected horse about a month ago.
Notify suspected Hendra virus cases by contacting:

• QPIF on 13 25 23 (during business hours)
• the Emergency Animal Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888 (24-hour hotline).

Contact the Queensland Health Hotline on 13 Health (432584) if you have concerns about possible exposure of people to Hendra virus.

fact sheet for the community.

community engagement calendar.

Find out more information on Hendra testing.

Published by Henry Sapiecha 4th Sept 2009

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