Categories

Archive for the ‘WARNINGS’ Category

Heart attack, stroke: popular painkillers to carry health warnings after 2016

Saturday, November 21st, 2015

spoonfull of pills image www.newcures.infopulsating heart animation image www.newcures.infoAttention sign image www.worldwidediamonds.info

The warnings will state ‘excessive use can be harmful and increase the risk of heart attack, stroke or liver damage’.

Some of Australia’s most popular painkilling medications will carry warnings from next year that they could put people at risk of heart attack and stroke.

The medications, which contain the active ingredients ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen, are freely available at the chemist and supermarket under brand names such as Nurofen, Advil and Voltaren.

Health authorities stopped short of the more radical actions of other countries such as the UK, where diclofenac has been made prescription-only.

Earlier this year, US health authorities warned even a few weeks of using the drugs could increase a person’s risk of a fatal heart attack.

Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) has been reviewing the safety of the drugs against the back of increasing reports of dangerous cardiovascular complications.

In 2010, Fairfax Media reported that the drugs had been linked to stroke and some experts believed they should be banned or sold only on prescription.

The TGA said its review found the medications were “safe when they were used according to the recommended doses for short durations, as instructed on the label”.

“However, inappropriate use or overuse of these medicines could pose a significant risk of cardiovascular events and, in the case of diclofenac, [liver toxicity],” it said.

The drugs are a type of medicine known as a “non-steroidal anti-inflammatory” medications. Another of this class of drugs, the arthritis drug Vioxx, triggered a $4.85 billion lawsuit amid evidence it doubled the risk of heart attack for patients, causing as many as 140,000 in the US alone.

All forms of ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen will now carry a warning that using them at high doses can increase your risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

The warning will state: “Do not use for more than a few days at a time unless a doctor has told you to. Do not exceed the recommended dose. Excessive use can be harmful and increase the risk of heart attack, stroke or liver damage.”

Most medications will be expected to carry the label by July 2016, although some have been given an extension until January 2017.

The Australian Self Medication Industry supports the changes to the warning labels, however, Alphapharm, which makes non-brand name generic versions of medicines, said while warnings on packets were sufficient for medications sold in pharmacies because of the quality of information provided by pharmacists, product inserts were needed when the drugs were sold at supermarkets to make sure consumers were properly informed.

ooo

Henry Sapiecha

How To Cure Cancer with Vitamin B-17 (VIDEO DOCUMENTARY)

Sunday, November 15th, 2015

Published on May 18, 2015

G.Edward Griffin is the author of the book A World Without Cancer. also the creator of this short 55 min documentary giving a synopsis of the case put forth in the book, that cancer is a vitamin deficiency disease, such as scurvy.

I urge all my brothers and sisters to share this with friends or family, everyone! this really is powerful knowledge.

OOO

Henry Sapiecha

SUPERBUG KPC-Oxa 48 WOULD NOT BE TAMED WITH ANY KNOWN ANTIBIOTIC & BRIAN POOL DIED

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

SUPERBUG THAT DEFIES ALL TREATMENTS WITH EVERY ANTIBIOTIC KNOWN

Brian Pool caught a superbug while overseas.

He died fighting a superbug that no antibiotic in the world could touch.

Wellington teacher Brian Pool is believed to be New Zealand’s first victim of an aggressive superbug, caught while he was overseas, that is resistant to every type of antibiotic.

Mr Pool, 68, spent most of the last six months of his life in quarantine, unable to leave his room even to sit in the courtyard.

“It was sad because we couldn’t give him a hug, we couldn’t really kiss him,” twin sister Maureen Dunn said.

“He just wanted to get out in the sun, and we couldn’t take him out.

“Being his twin sister, I would be the one who always rescued him . . . it was terrible, but there was nothing we could do.”

Her brother died on July 6, from complications caused by a stroke and unrelated to the bug.

But doctors say his immune system was weakened by fighting the nightmare bacteria.

The adventurous teacher, known for his quirky sense of humour, was living in Vietnam and teaching English when he suffered a brain haemorrhage on January 6.

He had surgery in Vietnam, where part of his skull was removed to relieve pressure on his brain, and was flown to New Zealand.

In Wellington Hospital, he was immediately isolated, a standard precaution for overseas patients.

Tests revealed he was carrying a strain of bacterium known as KPC-Oxa 48 – a “pan-resistant” organism that repels every kind of antibiotic.

“Nothing would touch it. Absolutely nothing,” Wellington Hospital clinical microbiologist Mark Jones said yesterday.

“It’s the first one that we’ve ever seen that is resistant to every single antibiotic known.

“This man was in the post-antibiotic era, and this is why so many agencies over the world are raising alarm bells.”

Earlier this year, British chief medical officer Sally Davies described resistance to antibiotics as a “catastrophic global threat” that should be ranked alongside terrorism.

New Zealand hospitals are already seeing increasing cases of multi-resistant “superbugs”, which can be treated by only a limited number of expensive antibiotics.

Dunn said the family was frightened, and even Mr Pool’s doctors did not seem to know what the superbug might do.

“They were shit scared, to put it bluntly, in case these bugs were transferred to another patient or taken out into the community.”

The message to others was clear, she said: “Don’t have an operation in a hospital overseas.”

Wellington Hospital infectious disease physician Michelle Balm said Mr Pool’s superbug could have been contracted when he was in hospital in Vietnam, or a few years earlier when he had hernia surgery in India.

Fairfax NZ News

WHAT IS KPC-Oxa 48 ?? See below

AAA

To the Editor: Class D OXA β-lactamases are characterized as penicillinases that can hydrolyze oxacillin and cloxacillin and are poorly inhibited by clavulanic acid and EDTA. OXA-48 is one of the few members of this family to possess notable carbapenem-hydrolyzing activity (1). First described in 2004 in Turkey, OXA-48 has recently started to spread in Europe and the Middle East (2). We report the recent emergence of the plasmid-encoded blaOXA-48 gene in multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae recovered from patients in Dakar, Senegal, in hospitals and in the community.

From November 2008 through October 2009, 11 Enterobacteriaceae isolates (8 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 1 Escherichia coli, 1 Enterobacter cloacae, and 1 Enterobacter sakazakii) with reduced susceptibility to imipenem were identified at the Institut Pasteur (Dakar, Senegal). Antibacterial drug susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion method and interpreted according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines (www.eucast.orgExternal Web Site Icon). Nine isolates were resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and also to other antibacterial drug classes.

The isolates were recovered from 6 patients with urinary tract infections, 4 patients with surgical infections, and 1 patient with omphalitis. Nine infections were hospital acquired (Le Dantec and Principal Hospitals). Because the patients died before antibacterial drug susceptibility testing could be completed, all 5 patients with surgical infections or omphalitis received only empirical therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanate. One patient with a nosocomial urinary tract infection caused by a co-trimoxazole–susceptible strain was successfully treated with this antibacterial agent. The antibacterial drug regimens of the remaining 4 patients were not known, and they were lost to follow-up. We determined the MICs of imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem by using the Etest method (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden), which showed that 9 isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem but either intermediately susceptible or resistant to ertapenem (Table). The 2 imipenem-nonsusceptible isolates were susceptible or intermediately susceptible to meropenem, and both were resistant to ertapenem.

We used previously described PCRs (1,37) to screen for carbapenem-hydrolyzing β-lactamase genes (blaVIM, blaIMP, blaKPC, and blaOXA-48), as well as plasmid-encoded blaCTX-M, blaAmpC, blaOXA-1, and blaTEM β-lactamase genes; the aac(6′)-Ib aminoglycoside resistance gene; the quinolone resistance genes qnrA,B,S; the tetracycline resistance genes tetA,B,D; and class 1 integron. The blaOXA-48, blaCTX-M, blaAmpC, and aac(6′)-Ib genes and the variable region of class 1 integron were then characterized by direct DNA sequencing of the PCR products. blaOXA-48 was present in all 11 isolates. blaVIM, blaIMP, and blaKPC were not detected. The qnr genes were present in 7 isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin. The aac(6′)-Ib-cr variant was present in 7 isolates resistant to gentamicin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin.

The 9 isolates resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins all harbored the blaCTX-M-15 gene. The E. coli isolate also harbored the plasmid-encoded blaAmpC gene ACT-1; blaCTX-M-15, blaOXA-1, blaTEM, and aac(6′)lb-cr were associated in 6 isolates. Long-range PCRs showed that these latter 4 genes were located in the same “multidrug resistance region,” as described in Senegal (6). Positive conjugation experiments with sodium azide–resistant E. coli J53 showed through PCR results, plasmid DNA extraction, and antibiogram patterns of the obtained transconjugants that blaOXA-48 was located on a 70-kb self-conjugative plasmid.

The genetic environment of blaOXA-48 was then investigated by PCR with primers specific for insertion sequence IS1999 and for the 5′ part of blaOXA-48 (1). blaOXA-48 was found to be part of a Tn1999 composite transposon composed of 2 copies of the insertion sequence IS1999, as reported (2). Further sequencing of the IS1999 located upstream of blaOXA-48 showed that it was consistently truncated by the insertion sequence IS1R, as initially described in Turkey and more recently in Lebanon and Egypt (2,8).

XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was then used to study the genetic relatedness of the 8 K. pneumoniae isolates. Three isolates had similar restriction profiles and had been recovered from 3 patients concurrently hospitalized at Le Dantec Hospital, suggesting nosocomial transmission. A class 1 integron harboring the dfrA1 trimethoprim-resistance gene was detected in the 3 clonal isolates.

Together, these findings show the recent emergence of blaOXA-48 in Senegal in community and hospital settings. They may also suggest the spread of the same major carrying plasmid between the Middle East and Africa. Although 9 of the 11 isolates were found to be susceptible to imipenem on the basis of their MICs, their MICs were nonetheless higher than those of blaOXA-48–negative isolates. This raises 2 issues. First, these strains might go undetected during routine antibacterial drug susceptibility testing, a problem that could be overcome by using ertapenem, a compound more susceptible to carbapenemases. Second, the clinical efficacy of imipenem on such strains is uncertain. The frequency of acquired carbapenemases, which emerged early after imipenem introduction in Senegal (2008), is probably strongly underestimated, partly owing to the limited availability of reliable clinical laboratories (9). Because multidrug resistance is prevalent among Enterobacteriaceae isolated in Dakar hospitals (B. Garin, unpub. data) and in rural communities (6), the emergence of blaOXA-48 is a clear cause for concern.

Olivier MoquetComments to Author , Coralie Bouchiat, Alfred Kinana, Abdoulaye Seck, Omar Arouna, Raymond Bercion, Sebastien Breurec, and Benoit Garin
Author affiliations: Author affiliations: Institut Pasteur, Dakar, Senegal (O. Moquet, C. Bouchiat, A. Kinana, A. Seck, S. Breurec, B. Garin); Hopital Principal, Dakar (O. Arouna, R. Bercion)

References

  1. Poirel L, Heritier C, Tolun V, Nordmann P. Emergence of oxacillinase-mediated resistance to imipenem in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2004;48:1522. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  2. Carrër A, Poirel L, Yilmaz M, Akan OA, Feriha C, Cuzon G, Emerging spread of OXA-48-encoding plasmid from Turkey and beyond. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2010;54:136973. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  3. Queenan AM, Bush K. Carbapenemases: the versatile beta-lactamases. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2007;20:44058. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  4. Poirel L, Naas T, Nicolas D, Collet L, Bellais S, Cavallo JD, Characterization of VIM-2, a carbapenem-hydrolyzing metallo-beta-lactamase and its plasmid- and integron-borne gene from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate in France. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2000;44:8917. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  5. Pérez-Pérez FJ, Hanson ND. Detection of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase genes in clinical isolates by using multiplex PCR. J Clin Microbiol. 2002;40:215362. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  6. Ruppé E, Woerther PL, Diop A, Sene AM, Da Costa A, Arlet G, Carriage of CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli isolates among children living in a remote village in Senegal. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009;53:31357. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  7. Guessennd N, Bremont S, Gbonon V, Kacou-Ndouba A, Ekaza E, Lambert T, Qnr-type quinolone resistance in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing enterobacteria in Abidjan, Ivory Coast [in French]. Pathol Biol (Paris). 2008;56:43946. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  8. Carrër A, Poirel L, Eraksoy H, Cagatay AA, Badur S, Nordmann P. Spread of OXA-48-positive carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in Istanbul, Turkey. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008;52:29504. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon
  9. Petti CA, Polage CR, Quinn TC, Ronald AR, Sande MA. Laboratory medicine in Africa: a barrier to effective health care. Clin Infect Dis. 2006;42:37782. DOIExternal Web Site IconPubMedExternal Web Site Icon

SUGAR IN THE MORNING,SUGAR IN THE EVENING,SUGAR AT SUPPERTIME WILL KILL YOU SOME SAY

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

SUGAR IS SAID BY SOME TO BE MORE DEADLY THAN SMOKES OR ALCOHOL???

We’ve seen what excessive amounts of alcohol can do to the body, remember Nicolas Cage’s performance in Leaving Las Vegas? Cirrhosis of the liver, behavioural changes, and finally complete metabolic shutdown. We know that alcohol in excess is toxic but a group of scientists are claiming that ‘added sugar’ is more detrimental to our health.

Scientists Robert Lustig, Laura Schmidt and Claire Brindis from the University of California, San Francisco are calling for governments worldwide to regulate foods and drinks with ‘added sugar’ as strictly as alcohol and tobacco. They are also calling for the sugary foods to be banned in and around schools, placing age limits on purchases as not only is it taxing to the liver, causing fatty liver disease, and ultimately leading to insulin resistance, but claim it to be the underlying causes of obesity and diabetes.

Dr. Lustig and his colleagues are prompting debate as they argue, citing numerous studies and statistics that indicating that sugar has a bigger impact on public health than alcohol and tobacco, as fructose can trigger processes that lead to a chronic disease pandemic including liver toxicity. They concede that a little is not a problem, but a lot kills — slowly.

Related article: Healthier sugar alternatives

No stranger to making provocative statements, in 2009 Dr. Lustig’s lecture “Sugar: The Bitter Truth,” was posted on YouTube and has been viewed by almost two million people, not bad for a 90-minute discussion on the evils of sugar.

Many health experts are disagreeing with the controversial article published in the journal Nature, such as Dr Alan Barclay, head of research at the Australian Diabetes Foundation. He told Lifehacker that “many of the statements simply do not apply to Australia and on certain issues there is little evidence to support their views. Sugar is not the issue” he said, “it is far more complicated than that.”

Professor Peter Clifton, head of nutritional interventions at Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute says, “sugar is just another form of over-consumed calories — easily available and very palatable but no more metabolically deadly than starch or fat calories and certainly not equivalent to alcohol”. “Alcohol toxicity is not just metabolic — it causes violence and road deaths and sugar in any of its forms cannot compete with this statistic,” he said.

However Lustig does highlight that the level of consumption of sugar is many times higher than what nature intended. As our ancestors found sugar in fruit, unprocessed and only available seasonally, and honey is well guarded by bees.

“Over the past 50 years, consumption of sugar has tripled worldwide. Nature made sugar hard to get; man made it easy,” the authors stated. The World Health Organisation states that worldwide the obese outnumber the undernourished. Will there be commercials made asking for donations to help prevent obese people dying of related disease?

Related article: Salt or sugar: which is worse?

Dr. Lustig and his colleagues may not be seeing their recommendations introduced by governments anytime soon, but as the paper points out, diet related diseases are costing around 75 percent of the total health-care dollars in the U.S., and that possibly regulation of the amount of sugar food and drink industries can add to their products should be introduced.

The article states, “Ultimately, food producers and distributors must reduce the amount of sugar added to foods. But sugar is cheap, sugar tastes good and sugar sells, so companies have little incentive to change.”

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha

EMERGENCY TREATMENT NECESSARY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WHO OVERINDULGE IN ENERGY DRINKS

Monday, January 16th, 2012

ENERGY DRINKS CAN BE DANGEROUS TO YOUNG PEOPLE

Growing numbers of young people have been hospitalised with caffeine poisoning after consuming energy drinks, suffering symptoms such as hallucinations and seizures, a new study has found.

Researchers have called for the caffeine-laced drinks to be regulated by health authorities with additional labelling and warnings about the potential danger of overdosing.

Energy drinks such as Red Bull, V and Mother are popular with young people and often contain ”energising” extracts such as guarana or ginseng alongside caffeine and sugar.

Researchers Naren Gunja and Jared Brown analysed data from the  Poisons Information Centre, which fields 110,000 poison-related calls a year. They looked at 297 calls related to energy drinks over a six-year period and found the number of people seeking help for caffeine poisoning leapt from 12 in 2004 to 65 in 2010.

Nearly half of the victims – 46 per cent – had mixed their energy drinks with other substances, such as alcohol, drugs or caffeine tablets, while 43 per cent had symptoms that were serious enough to need treatment at a hospital emergency department.

Victims were often young, with a median age of 17, and more than half were men.

Most people experienced stomach trouble or anxiety but a minority, about 7 per cent, suffered severe poisoning symptoms such as hallucinations, seizures or heart problems.

”The phenomenon of mixing energy drinks with alcohol, stimulants and other co-ingestants is clearly occurring and is a serious concern,” the authors wrote.

The report, published today in the Medical Journal of Australia, said a typical can of energy drink could contain up to 300mg of caffeine.

”Consumers are likely to be unaware of the variation in chemical composition and caffeine dosage in energy drinks, and with little or no warnings on products the potential for overdose remains ever-present,” the report says.

Another concern was the 68 young children, including babies as young as seven months, who accidentally consumed the energy drinks over the period studied and suffered symptoms such as hyperactivity.

Sourced & published by Henry Sapiecha